Talk:Hamilcar Barca

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Military history (Rated Start-Class)
MILHIST This article is within the scope of the Military history WikiProject. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the project and see a list of open tasks. To use this banner, please see the full instructions.
Start This article has been rated as Start-Class on the quality assessment scale.
WikiProject Biography / Military (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Biography, a collaborative effort to create, develop and organize Wikipedia's articles about people. All interested editors are invited to join the project and contribute to the discussion. For instructions on how to use this banner, please refer to the documentation.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the military biography work group (marked as Low-importance).
 
WikiProject Africa (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Africa, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Africa on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 


Untitled[edit]

This article seems oddly NPOV -- pro-gallant Romans and anti-untrustworthy Carthaginians. Can we have a little more evenhandedness after 2,200 years? --Michael K SmithTalk 18:55, 6 May 2012 (UTC)

Family name overkill[edit]

From the Hannibal article: "In light of Hamilcar Barca's cognomen, historians refer to Hamilcar's family as the Barcids; however, scholars debate whether the cognomen Barca (meaning "thunderbolt") was applied to Hamilcar alone or was hereditary within his family."

Since there is an article on the Barcid family might as well let that take care of it. The brothers' article names don't include it and usage keeps the brothers' names free of it. So until irrefutable evidence to the contrary, cognomen it is. Manytexts (talk) 04:12, 20 October 2012 (UTC)

"thus could be of Greek or Libyan origin"[edit]

Is this statement original research? Are there any sources out there that support it? It seems like original research to me. I think it's best if we remove it (unless relevant sources are provided, of course), and I plan to do so, unless there are any objections. Best, --Spivorg (talk) 21:13, 8 March 2014 (UTC)

Alright. I will now remove the statement. Best, --Spivorg (talk) 10:25, 17 March 2014 (UTC)

Death of Hamilcar - Derivation of Barcino (ancient Barcelona) city name from cognomen "Barcas"[edit]

The revision that questions the well-known and long assumed derivation of "Barcino" (written in Greek-transliterated Iberian as "Barkeno") cites a source which, in fact, says nothing like what the contributor of the revision is contending it says - does not even imply it. Considering the time lines, that place-name being attested on coins from the "last decades of the 3rd-century B.C." belies neither that the town could have been named/renamed in honor of Hamilcar or the Barcids, nor that Hamilcar himself could be considered to have "founded" it by enhancing its significance as a settlement or port. Seems rather to bolster the traditional opinion. Neither the cited source nor the contributor offers up an independent lexeme in ancient Iberian with a root like "bark*" or "barke*" that would support the contributor's apparent bias that the name is other than from Phoenician. Is it just the thrill of iconoclasm with this guy? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.13.136.34 (talk) 21:50, 24 March 2015 (UTC)

No need to cop an attitude. The legend that the Carthaginians founded Barcelona and that it was named after Hamilcar Barca has no archaeological or linguistic support. Etymological consensus has long been that the town was named Barkeno by the early Iberian inhabitants of the area, not by the Carthaginians.[1][2] Josep Padró i Parcerisa says: "It was probably on the Montjuic site that the drachmae with the inscription Barkeno in Iberian characters were minted in the third century B.C."[3] There is no archaeological evidence that the Carthaginians had a settlement on the site of present-day Barcelona. Carlstak (talk) 03:03, 25 March 2015 (UTC)
Also, the Dietler-López-Ruiz book, Colonial Encounters in Ancient Iberia: Phoenician, Greek, and Indigenous Relations, says on page 75: "...while Montjuic, though still largely unknown, seemed to have been an important port and probably the city of Barkeno..." Montjuïc is a hill in Barcelona overlooking the harbour, southwest of the city center. Carlstak (talk) 02:45, 26 March 2015 (UTC)