Talk:Hausa language

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Yoruba?[edit]

Dear all, I have a new friend who was born in Ode Omu then lived in Lagos.He is in England on his own waiting for his wife and children to come over in April.The question that I would like to ask is what is his home language as I would like to write him a few messages and learn a few frazes to make him feel welcome and show him that I care.Please let me know.Colin

Odeomu is in Osun State, which is largely Yoruba; Lagos, too is largely Yoruba. So your best guess is that he speaks the Yoruba language. When it comes to finding Yoruba phrases, you could try Google or you could look for a book on West African languages. Note, however, that Nigeria has over 500 languages, and that while Yoruba is your most likely bet, I am in no way certain of my answer. In the future, you're more likely to get quick answers at the Reference desk/Language. Picaroon 22:46, 10 March 2007 (UTC)
I am Pastor  J Ademola Odewale. I was born in Odeomu but now live in USA. You did not tell us where you are.You can as well ask your friend what language(s) he speaks. However, people from Odeomu are Yorubas and we speak the Yoruba language. About 30% of Nigerians speak Yoruba language.  —Preceding unsigned comment added by 204.11.150.42 (talk) 07:29, 25 February 2010 (UTC) 

Alphabet on BBC[edit]

Hi,

BBC Hausa is written in plain Latin alphabet with no special African characters.

Can someone please elaborate on that?

Thanks in advance. --Amir E. Aharoni 09:25, 21 June 2007 (UTC)

Niger Scouting[edit]

Can someone render "Be Prepared", the Scout Motto, into the Hausa language and the Zarma language? Thanks! Chris 05:27, 8 August 2007 (UTC)

Good day,
my name is Hassan Dangambo, Hausa man from kano state of nigeria. Tte word
"Be Prepared" in Hausa language is " A zama cikin shiri " 21:19, 30 August 2007 (UTC)

Diphthongs[edit]

The article says: "Diphthongs are: /ai/, /au/, /iu/ and /ui/." But it fails to explain which are the semivowels in /iu/ and /ui/. Since the first two examples are falling diphthongs, i am tempted to guess the others are too (that is, /iw/ and /uj/, altho i'm not sure whether in IPA you can use /j/ and /w/ after vowels or only before them). 200.96.95.178 (talk) 20:40, 2 June 2008 (UTC)

Transliteration[edit]

Could you discuss the effects of transliteration from English into Hausa more fully? For example, let's say a Nigerian woman wanted to name her child Gregory. What would be the Hausa equivalent of that? -Agur bar Jacé (talk) 02:05, 12 August 2008 (UTC)

Mistake[edit]

Hausa was classified as a Semitic laguage by a German, who had mistaken obvious borrowings from Arabic for Hausa words. This mistake began the tradition of including Hausa in the Hamito-Semitc group. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 94.30.71.244 (talk) 12:55, 28 May 2010 (UTC) This was in the mid-19th century. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 94.30.71.244 (talk) 13:20, 28 May 2010 (UTC)

Ghanaian Hausa[edit]

Can you please clarify whether this is mutually intelligible with the standard, or just those few minor phonological differences? —Wiki Wikardo 04:10, 8 June 2010 (UTC)

Grammar and vocabulary[edit]

There seems to be very little or no information on grammar and vocabulary. Since I came here looking for that information, I can't currently solve that problem, but isn't it a rather major omission? What should I do when I come across such a major omission which I can't remedy?

Nineteenthly (talk) 07:38, 30 June 2010 (UTC)

Spread not true![edit]

the following is not true, you cannot use Hausa in Dakar and Accra..

"The language is used as a lingua franca (similar to Swahili in East Africa) in a much larger swathe of West Africa (Accra, Abidjan, Dakar, Lomé, Cotonou, Bamako, Conakry, Ouagadougou, etc.)"

Yes, there are Hausa traders in those cities, so you can actually use it a fair amount, but that's like saying Yiddish was a lingua franca of pre-WWII Europe. — kwami (talk) 00:21, 2 January 2011 (UTC)

Palatals or palatalized velars?[edit]

Up to 7 April 2010, the phonology section stated that Hausa has palatalized, plain and labialized velar plosives, e.g. [kʲ k kʷ]. Then, User:Alpinu replaced most (though not all) the occurrences of symbols of palatalized velars by those of actual palatals, e.g. [kʲ] by [c], without no comment beyond "just include IPA symbols /c/ and /ɟ/"; and later (I can't find it now), someone replaced the term "palatalized velars" by palatals (with no comment). Contrary to what many people seem to believe, palatals – audio files – and palatalized velars are not the same thing! Palatals sound more similar to palatalized coronals (e.g. [tʲ]) than to palatalized velars – sound files of [tʲ], [dʲ] and [kʲ] are here.

I don't know if this was a change for the better, because I don't know what Hausa really sounds like. Does anyone have the cited sources? Does this feature differ between dialects (I wouldn't at all be surprised if this turned out to be the case)?

If nobody comments on this in the next month or so, I'll try to find recordings (BBC broadcasts in Hausa, right?) and simply change the article – or not – according to my own impression, but of course a more citable source would be preferable.

David Marjanović (talk) 23:21, 9 January 2016 (UTC)

Ƴ ƴ[edit]

According to both the transcription here and my impression of the linked sound file, ƴ isn't a palatalized glottal stop [ʔʲ], but a creaky-voiced palatal approximant [j̰]. I will therefore change the article in about a minute.

However, it's easily possible that this actually varies among dialects. If you have a reference or sound file that attests [ʔʲ], please say so!

David Marjanović (talk) 23:26, 9 January 2016 (UTC)

The palatalized glottal stop [ʔʲ] for ƴ in Niger orthography or ʼy in Nigeria orthography probably comes from reading of ʼ + y. Newman 2000, page 3, describes ʼy as “laryngealized semivowel”. So “creaky-voiced palatal approximant” is correct. --Moyogo/ (talk) 18:02, 10 January 2016 (UTC)
David Marjanović: Do you hear the same in http://aflang.humnet.ucla.edu/Hausa/Pronunciation/consonants.html#anchor112931 in the audio for ʼyāʼyā? That page describes it as a glottalized y or glottal stop combined with y. So maybe both are valid? After all creaky voice is a type of glottalization. --Moyogo/ (talk) 18:19, 10 January 2016 (UTC)