Talk:He-gassen

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I Call BS[edit]

He-Gassen? Really? I'm gonna need some more reputable sources before I believe this one besides a Daily Mail article and a supposed scroll at Waseda that is not directly referenced. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.194.176.70 (talk) 17:10, 16 January 2014 (UTC)

I Call BS ALSO[edit]

This is nonsense. It's a hoax. Georgekwatson (talk) 02:13, 17 January 2014 (UTC) I have proposed deleting this. Georgekwatson (talk) 20:32, 20 January 2014 (UTC)

Except you forget Waseda University is one of top universities in Japan and they host this scroll.--AldNonUcallin?☎ 04:56, 22 February 2014 (UTC)

Serious reliability issues[edit]

Currently, the only source for any information in this article (aside from the image of the scroll itself) is a Daily Mail article written by an unnamed reporter and using unknown sources of information. This is far from a reliable source, especially when it's the only source given. The only information that appears to be verifiable from another source is the name applied to it, which appears to be (in altered form) from the Waseda University Library website.

For that matter, its notability isn't established either; does this really require its own article, rather than simple inclusion in another article related to Japanese art and culture?

G-Flex (talk) 06:05, 21 April 2015 (UTC)

It seems the logical thing to do is check what the book by Henshall has to say. Also, it would be useful to find out if the Japanese page has any more info. Drabkikker (talk) 08:14, 12 July 2015 (UTC)
Found an online copy of the book; this is what it says on p. 70: In any event, the rule of the shoguns, which had lasted for almost 700 years, was at an end. The foreign devils were back, and did not look like leaving. When these devils had first appeared, a popular cartoon, based on the Japanese tradition of ‘farting contests' (he-gassen), had shown westerners being blasted away by Japanese farts.<57> But such a scenario was, so to speak, just so much hot air. The foreign devils were not blown away. On the contrary, it was the foreigners who, metaphorically speaking, had finally blown open the doors of the closed country. Western fart power had prevailed.
Note 57 refers to Steele, M. W., 2003, Alternative Narratives in Modern Japanese History, Routledge, London, p. 14, which is on Google Books but does not include page 14.
He-gassen also features in the 1994 novel Shinju by Laura Joh Rowland, and in Howard E. Link, Waves and Plagues: The art of Masami Teraoka (1988).
All in all, one gets the impression that the scroll is genuine. Drabkikker (talk) 10:00, 13 July 2015 (UTC)
  • Looking at google books, it is clear there is a tradition of such subjects stretching back several centuries, unfortunately only covered in snippet views. Johnbod (talk) 16:52, 21 July 2015 (UTC)