Talk:Healthcare in Cuba

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Starvation is good for you?[edit]

This section makes me wonder:

Malnutrition created epidemics, but it had positive effects too. Manuel Franco describes the Special Period as "the first, and probably the only, natural experiment, born of unfortunate circumstances, where large effects on diabetes, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality have been related to sustained population-wide weight loss as a result of increased physical activity and reduced caloric intake".[24]

Sounds a little like "Arbeit Macht Frei", doesn't it?
It's not our job in wikipedia to do WP:PROMOTION for anyone, including the government of Cuba. What concerns me is us lending wikipedia's voice to any mitigation of the national catastrophe of Cuba's "special period" by unreservedly saying "Malnutrition created epidemics, but it had positive effects too," then doing an in-line cite to an article in a Cuba-sympathetic periodical praising the effects of nationwide malnutrition on a country. I don't doubt the statement's true, but we ought to weight it properly by saying
  • "According to Johns Hopkins University's Manuel Franco, malnutrition created epidemics, but it had positive effects too. He describes the Special Period as "the first, and probably the only, natural experiment, born of unfortunate circumstances, where large effects on diabetes, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality have been related to sustained population-wide weight loss as a result of increased physical activity and reduced caloric intake".
This is a little wordier, but it makes clear Dr. Franco's saying this, not us.
What do you think? loupgarous (talk) 20:47, 7 October 2016 (UTC)
I changed the wording to
  • "According to Johns Hopkins University epidemiologist Manuel Franco, malnutrition created epidemics, but it had positive effects too. Dr. Franco describes the Special Period as "the first, and probably the only, natural experiment, born of unfortunate circumstances, where large effects on diabetes, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality have been related to sustained population-wide weight loss as a result of increased physical activity and reduced caloric intake"
A little wordier - not much - but the sentence is now WP:NPOV where before, it was in wikipedia's voice, and that's not good for such a potentially contentious statement. loupgarous (talk) 21:00, 7 October 2016 (UTC)

NEJM[edit]

New England Journal of Medicine has an article this week (free access):

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp1215226?query=featured_home

Perspective: A Different Model — Medical Care in Cuba

Edward W. Campion, M.D., and Stephen Morrissey, Ph.D.

N Engl J Med 2013; 368:297-299

January 24, 2013DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1215226

--Nbauman (talk) 04:26, 24 January 2013 (UTC)

Unrelated fact used as support[edit]

The first paragraph sentence "AIDS is only one-sixth as common on a per-capita basis as in the United States" is a non-sequeter since AIDS prevalence is tied to risky behavior, not improvements in medical care. The sentence is being used to provide evidence that Cuba's healthcare has improved since 1960 despite having no relation to this fact. Request removal of this sentence. --Memarshall (talk) 08:15, 8 November 2013 (UTC)

Lancet[edit]

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2814%2960090-8/fulltext

The Lancet, Volume 383, Issue 9914, Pages 294 - 295, 25 January 2014 doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60090-8

Cuba's economic reforms prompt debate about health care

Sharmila Devi

--Nbauman (talk) 02:30, 25 January 2014 (UTC)

"Present" section features factual inconsitancies.[edit]

The section labelled "Present" features a table of figures ranking Cuba on various health related criteria. This section is attributed to "factbook" which is a CIA produced document. I call into question the neutrality of an organisation that has spent half a century spreading anti-Cuban propaganda and trying to destroy the Cuban regime. The table itself links to other wikipedia articles on the subject, which provide more up to date figures (2011 instead of 2003-2006) from more relaiable sources (WHO, UNICEF). These figures contradict those from the CIA, where the CIA had Cuba at 125/167 for AIDs prevelance, UNICEF has 52/169.

Even the CIA estimates given in this article are wrong (or out dated), the CIA 2013 estimates have Cuba at 44/225 for lowest infant mortality, where the article has them at 168/226. The UN ranks them 32/188.

This section should be deleted or updated with accurate information. 82.69.49.169 (talk) 11:55, 6 January 2015 (UTC)