Talk:Helianthus annuus

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Heliotropism[edit]

The Heliotropism section mentions "The heliotropic motion of the bud is performed by the pulvinus, a flexible segment just below the bud, due to reversible changes in turgor pressure, which occurs without growth". How is turgor pressured changed actively by the plant? Is the citation for the line the same as the citation for the previous sentence? If not, what is the source?

Thank you in advance to whoever holds the knowledge and responds. 冷雾 (talk) 00:38, 28 July 2013 (UTC)

wow[edit]

i think that this is a very well done article. It has all the sections clearly labeled and it is easy to read. One small thing would maybe be to have less sections, although I do think that for showing so many different aspects of the sunflower you do a good job of keeping it focused. Overall well done, probably one of the best I have read. I would say try to simplify it a little bit, and are all the pictures relevant to the article? Adrian Arias —Preceding unsigned comment added by Aarias (talkcontribs)

why do sunflowers "want" to follow the sun?[edit]

what do they get out of it? is this known? guessed by relevant public work? I myself would even take a clue, here. (thats I really wanna get info on this) Bye and thanks. Pablo2garcia 00:25, 2 February 2007 (UTC)

Heliotropic flowers are more prevalent among plants in alpine areas. The absorbed light makes the flowers warmer, which attracts more pollinating insects. http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/full/10.1046/j.1365-3040.1998.00336.x?cookieSet=1 May be the sunflower's heliotropism is a rudimentary feature from an alpine past? Ceinturion 12:46, 11 February 2007 (UTC)

Pizarro?[edit]

It says that he cultivated them around 1000 B.C.... but this is impossible because Pizarro didn't even go to the Americas until the 16th century A.D.

Although the text did not say Pizarro cultivated sunflowers, the sentence has been rephrased. Ceinturion 12:14, 11 February 2007 (UTC)

Other types and species of sunflower[edit]

There are many species in the genus Helianthus all of them "sunflowers", they possibly deserve a mention as do the decorative, dwarf and giant varieties that can aparently grow upto 7.76m (25ft 5.5in) tall. Some mention could also be made of sunflower growing competitions or how to grow them. 84.51.146.100 06:19, 19 April 2007 (UTC)

A sunflower is not a weed[edit]

I made a comment about this on my Talk page, and I will copy an excerpt here as my source:

Here's a line from the beginning of the Weed article (emphasis mine):

Weeds may be unwanted because they are unsightly, or they limit the growth of other plants by blocking light or using up nutrients from the soil.

I would also agree with the "unsightly" definition to an extent, but you cannot generalize it to "any plants that are unwanted, or haven't been planted by the grower." What if, for example, an acorn is somehow brought onto the property (maybe by an animal)? Is the oak tree that grows from it considered a weed? --Procrastinatrix 18:42, 2 August 2007 (UTC)

Yes, in this very general sense, if the oak sprouts in the middle of a person's prize dahlia patch, they may yank it out as a weed. That's what a weed is, an undesired plant, not in its proper location according to some criterion. KP Botany 19:42, 11 August 2007 (UTC)


REALLY PEOPLE!!! Look up the definition of WEED in the dictionary! Learn instead of making up meanings of words! — Preceding unsigned comment added by 67.247.188.156 (talk) 21:16, 1 June 2012 (UTC)

Probably too many images[edit]

Wikipedia articles aren't really supposed to be general image gallery pages; ideally, each image should have a specific role in illustrating some fact about sunflowers. AnonMoos 07:22, 12 September 2007 (UTC)

Sunflower[edit]

I don't understand this sentence...

"Sunflowers can be processed into a peanut butter alternative, Sunbutter, especially in China, Russia, the United States, the Middle East and Europe."

It seems redundant. It lists pretty much the whole world. maybe it should be rephrased? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Lordmichael21 (talkcontribs) 20:14, 2 October 2007 (UTC)

The sentence doesn't make sense because it is grammatically incorrect. (Rikku 16:04, 26 October 2007 (UTC))

Andygusgs should.............[edit]

You guys should try to make more pictures of sunflower seeds such as the process of frying it. Tell me when it is posted. Andygusgs (talk) 23:52, 12 April 2008 (UTC)

Better you do it yourself Ceinturion (talk) 08:22, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

WikiProject Food and drink Tagging[edit]

This article talk page was automatically added with {{WikiProject Food and drink}} banner as it falls under Category:Food or one of its subcategories. If you find this addition an error, Kindly undo the changes and update the inappropriate categories if needed. The bot was instructed to tagg these articles upon consenus from WikiProject Food and drink. You can find the related request for tagging here . Maximum and careful attention was done to avoid any wrongly tagging any categories , but mistakes may happen... If you have concerns , please inform on the project talk page -- TinucherianBot (talk) 01:33, 4 July 2008 (UTC)

Innacurate domestication origin information[edit]

In fact, the origin of domestication has been fairly conclusively shown to have happened in the southeastern US. Basically, all domesticated sunflowers (whether from mexico or wherever) are more closely related to wild populations from the US than to wild populations in mexico. This has been shown using allozymes, nuclear, and chloroplast markers. There are only two archeological sites in mexico, plus some ehtnographic data to suggest otherwise, and these could have originated from an early (pre-columbian) introduction from the north.

lots of evidence to back this up:

Burke, John, M., Shunxue Tang, Steven J. Knappb, and Loren H. Rieseberg. 2002. Genetic Analysis of Sunflower Domestication. Genetics, 161: 1257-1267

Abigail V. Harter, Keith A. Gardner1, Daniel Falush2, David L. Lentz3, Robert A. Bye4 & Loren H. Rieseberg. 2004. Origin of extant domesticated sunflowers in eastern North America. Nature, 430: 201-205

Rieseberg, Loren H. and Gerald J. Seiler. 1990. Molecular Evidence and the Origin and Development of the Domesticated Sunflower (Helianthus annum , Asteraceae). Economic Botany 44: 79-91.

Admittedly there is "controversy" in the field about this but the article should at least reflect both perspectives, since the evidence is definitely on the side of one domestication origin in the US.

24.84.193.187 (talk) 14:26, 31 July 2008 (UTC)maayan

Article title[edit]

This page needs to be moved to ''Helianthus annuus'' or Common sunflower. Sunflower covers a large group of plants and the only vernacular name limited to this species is "Common sunflower". Note this search for a quick overview. [1]. Hardyplants (talk) 07:04, 11 December 2008 (UTC)

I agree, this article should be re-titled. Janeky (talk) 23:36, 24 May 2009 (UTC)
Okay, it has now been five years since you proposed this change, and nothing has happened: no one has yet moved the page, and neither has anyone objected to the idea. I am going to assume that Hardyplants knows what he/she is talking about (I am not a botanist, though neither am I completely ignorant of plant taxonomy/ naming) and will be bold and try right now to carry out this move myself. This is a pretty frequently visited page, and I have never attempted a thing like this before. But if it needs to be done, then it should be done-- somebody watch my back, here goes bold nothin'! KDS4444Talk 06:35, 28 June 2014 (UTC)
Aaaaaaaaand done! Article moved successfully, now just trying to clean up the redirects! Yay! KDS4444Talk 07:10, 28 June 2014 (UTC)

germination![edit]

Sunflowers take from 10-20 days to start gerrmination to get them too start gerrmination you have to have them in a sunny spot. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.14.133.164 (talk) 20:40, 18 April 2009 (UTC)

"Cultivation and uses"[edit]

Sunflowers may also be used to extract toxic ingredients from soil, such as lead, arsenic and uranium. They were used to remove uranium, cesium-137, and strontium-90 from soil after the Chernobyl disaster (see phytoremediation).

This doesn't explain why Sunflowers may be used for this purpose? Is it just that they are an abundant organic substance that is found in surroundings at these circumstance and therefore free access (that organic substances have a hygroscopic or "sponging" effect to the high end element or such?). In addition the Cough medicine article says that the sunflower is an expectorant, is this do to a molecule or alkaloid that grows within it or a combination of the elements that form it; or is this a common facet to grass and hay and most other plant life (which I know animals eat for various gastro-intestinal remedies)? 4.242.174.188 (talk) 11:46, 6 October 2009 (UTC)

Good point. There is nothing about permission except for the misuse of the word "may." I have replaced "may also" with "can." — Jay L09 (talk) 15:57, 9 July 2010 (UTC)

The seeds and carnitine content.....[edit]

--222.64.215.115 (talk) 05:41, 6 April 2010 (UTC)

File:Sunflower sky backdrop.jpg to appear as POTD soon[edit]

Hello! This is a note to let the editors of this article know that File:Sunflower sky backdrop.jpg will be appearing as picture of the day on January 31, 2011. You can view and edit the POTD blurb at Template:POTD/2011-01-31. If this article needs any attention or maintenance, it would be preferable if that could be done before its appearance on the Main Page so Wikipedia doesn't look bad. :) Thanks! howcheng {chat} 06:27, 29 January 2011 (UTC)

Sunflower
Sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) are large flowering plants native to the Americas. They most commonly grow to heights between 1.5 and 3.5 m (5 and 11 ft), although the tallest known sunflower reached 12 m (39 ft) high. The large inflorescence is composed of a flower head (or "composite flower") of numerous florets (small flowers) crowded together. The florets within the sunflower's cluster are arranged in a spiral pattern and will mature into seeds. The seeds are used as snack food, expeller pressed into sunflower oil, made into sunflower butter (a peanut butter alternative), or milled into flour.Photo: Fir0002


Heliotropism[edit]

The notion that mature sunflower heads track the sun appears to be widespread. I suspect many people come to the WP page to find out if this is true. I think it is relevant to note that this notion is not true. To say that mature sunflowers exhibit no diurnal movement is not strong enough a refutation of this myth, and the use of the word diurnal is unnecessarily obscure, in my opinion.```` — Preceding unsigned comment added by Michaplot (talkcontribs) 09:52, 18 April 2011 (UTC)

Image queue[edit]

The following images were in a gallery removed from the page per WP:IG because they're a rather indiscriminate collection of images of the article subject. When the article is expanded, some may be moved back to the article inline with prose. Until then they're queued here. Rkitko (talk) 13:55, 8 July 2012 (UTC)

Page move undone[edit]

I've restored the page following an undiscussed move. If the page needs renaming, seek consensus here first. Vsmith (talk) 23:27, 15 August 2012 (UTC)

"Structure" section[edit]

I am not sure the new section at the beginning has improved the article. It is an plethora of botany jargon (dicot, radicle, taproot, apical meristem, plumule, xylem, phloem, cortex, pith, calyx, corolla, and perianth). I would think it is not something the general reader of wikipedia would want to read, outside the scope of wikipedia. Ceinturion (talk) 18:26, 5 December 2012 (UTC)

Agree. A diagram would be very helpful.冷雾 (talk) 00:42, 28 July 2013 (UTC)

Culture[edit]

I think it would be better to remove the entire 'culture' section, which currently is just a bullet list of non-encyclopedic information (tourist information and company logos). Any objections? Ceinturion (talk) 09:48, 3 July 2013 (UTC)

Do it, baby! (if you haven't already... Sorry for the drive-by talk page commentary).KDS4444Talk 11:03, 28 June 2014 (UTC)

Article in Need of Revision[edit]

This article is full of incorrectly used jargon and some bizarre usages, some of which are not even botanical. Either someone is messing with us, or the article was edited by someone with a poor grasp of botany. The entire structure section should probably be removed or completely rewritten, and the rest of the article rewritten as well. This article used to be better. What happened? Any thoughts?Michaplot (talk) 17:17, 17 April 2014 (UTC)

An anonymous user created the structure section on 4 december 2012 (diff), and he shuffled a few sections. I wouldn't mind if those edits were reverted. But I don't know much about botanical jargon. Ceinturion (talk) 20:36, 17 April 2014 (UTC)
Michaplot, this is your opportunity to be WP:BOLD and switch the article back to a version you think was the best one! Anonymous users are somewhat famous for doing what Ceinturion describes: executing messy revisions and taking no accountability for them by using an IP address. The good news is that their work can quickly be undone if someone (you?) will take the time to look at the article's history log and figure out where the good stuff "left off". Once you have established that, reverting to that version is pretty straightforward, I think (though I do not think I have ever done a revert myself that goes back more than one edit in an article's history... but that means nothing). Will you sally forth, good sir? KDS4444Talk 11:02, 28 June 2014 (UTC)

More information on agricultural cultivation and world production areas would be welcome. The map is nice but a description would be desirable. It is for example not clear how the crop is normalised but I guess that maybe a crop of x kg/ha might be an average eg corresponding to a case where 25% of the cultivated soil is used for sunflower giving 4x kg/ha on average for those 25% i.e. x=25%*4x. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 150.227.15.253 (talk) 21:18, 4 July 2014 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. Editors desiring to contest the closing decision should consider a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: page moved. Armbrust The Homunculus 08:12, 5 July 2014 (UTC)


Common sunflowerHelianthus annuus – Botany article on a species, belongs under its own Latin-named article space. Consensus seems to be that this is where it belongs, without controversy. Would move it there myself over the current redirect but there is already an edit history so no can do. KDS4444Talk 10:56, 28 June 2014 (UTC)

  • Support The best solution is probably for "sunflower" to redirect to new page "List of plants known as sunflower" (as is the developing norm for such cases, e.g. Nettle redirects to List of plants known as nettle). The genus and all the species should then be at the scientific name. Peter coxhead (talk) 11:35, 28 June 2014 (UTC)
Turns out there already is an article on sunflowers, Helianthus, and I have now turned the "Sunflower" page into a redirect to that, which seems be the most consistent and appropriate move. This article on the common sunflower still needs to be relocated to Helianthus annuus, I think. KDS4444Talk 23:56, 28 June 2014 (UTC)

The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page or in a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

File:Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de La Blanca, Cardejón, España, 2012-09-01, DD 02.JPG to appear as POTD[edit]

Hello! This is a note to let the editors of this article know that File:Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de La Blanca, Cardejón, España, 2012-09-01, DD 02.JPG will be appearing as picture of the day on October 18, 2014. You can view and edit the POTD blurb at Template:POTD/2014-10-18. If this article needs any attention or maintenance, it would be preferable if that could be done before its appearance on the Main Page. Thanks! — Crisco 1492 (talk) 02:13, 27 September 2014 (UTC)

Sunflowers
A field of common sunflowers (Helianthus annuus) near Cardejón, Aragon, Spain. This species of sunflower, indigenous to the Americas, was brought to Europe in the 16th century and used widely (together with its oil) as a cooking ingredient, though it can also be used as bird food, as livestock forage, and in some industrial applications.Photograph: Diego Delso


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Adding an informative sentence[edit]

I plan on adding a sentence to the heliotropism section to include a detail I thought would help others understand how helioptropism works. This is my first time editing a wiki article so I am still not sure what the proper etiquette is for informing others that I am adding onto an article. If it is necessary, the sentence I am going to add is: They are able to regulate their circadian rhythm in response to the blue-light emitted by a light source. Leetif03 (talk) 22:54, 21 April 2018 (UTC) [1]