Talk:Heliocentrism

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Former good article Heliocentrism was one of the Natural sciences good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
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September 3, 2004 Featured article candidate Not promoted
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Current status: Delisted good article
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Apology for editing error[edit]

I recently reverted a replacement of this link in a citation in the article with this one. When I first checked the article pointed to by the second link I did not take sufficient care to ensure that I had properly understood the small part of the article's introduction that I quickly glanced over. I consequently obtained the mistaken notion that the linked article was a rebuttal of the one cited, rather than a reprint of it. My apologies for the error, particlarly to the editor from IP address 143.52.60.254, who was responsible for the perfectly correct updating of the link. Thanks to another editor, Noren, who has now corrected my mistake.
David Wilson (talk · cont) 08:33, 18 February 2015 (UTC)

Utility of Heliocentrism[edit]

There is scant mention of the navigational and timekeeping advantages of the heliocentric system. The article might benefit from a short section on this subject. 31.69.1.10 (talk) 10:50, 5 March 2015 (UTC)

There are some advantages in a geocentric system. If a space-craft is passing Saturn, a Saturno-centric system will be useful, too. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 92.211.75.21 (talk) 10:11, 2 May 2015 (UTC)

Greek[edit]

every article here on eng wiki starts with greece. i am afraid you got it wrong this time. the earliest notion that the sun is a center of this system is found in babylonian astronomy. oh wait, is babylon greek too?89.205.2.27 (talk) 15:28, 20 July 2015 (UTC)

Perhaps 89.205.2.27 can produce proof that the Babylonians used a heliocentric system before that of Aristarchus. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.177.160.31 (talk) 14:19, 20 October 2015 (UTC)
Pythagoras was putting forward a non-geocentric model of the visible universe. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.177.160.31 (talk) 10:11, 22 October 2015 (UTC)
Pythagoras seems to travelled, but perhaps not to Babylon.
See Pythagorean astronomical system. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.177.160.31 (talk) 10:28, 22 October 2015 (UTC)

86.177.160.31, I can produce proof that the Babylonians used a heliocentric system before that of Aristarchus. I think that statements of the following sources would add some useful missing information. Firstly, Babylonian heliocentric ideas predate Aristarchus (authored by the cosmologist who graduated Harvard) and secondly, geocentrism lasted until the 17th century. Although the title "We've Never Been Alone: A History of Extraterrestrial Intervention" is a little irrelevant the quote is from the passage "Who Invented Mathematics and the Sciences".
Ward, Paul Von (2011). We've Never Been Alone: A History of Extraterrestrial Intervention. Hampton Roads Publishing. p. 174. ISBN 161283177X, 9781612831770 Check |isbn= value: invalid character (help). A little later, Aristarchus, credited with first proposing the heliocentric theory of the universe, was only restating ideas long lost in Mesopotamia. 
Arp, Robert; Caplan Arthur (2013). 1001 Ideas That Changed the Way We Think. McGraw Hill Professional. p. 206. ISBN 1476705720, 9781476705729 Check |isbn= value: invalid character (help). Thanks to Cladius Ptolemy in the second cneutry CE, geocentrism became the dominant worldview until well into the 17th century. 
— Preceding unsigned comment added by 167.160.36.45 (talkcontribs) 08:19, December 11, 2015‎ (UTC)

There is no way Paul von Ward's books could be regarded as reliable sources on ancient astronomical or cosmological beliefs. According to his CV, he has no academic qualifications in ancient history, Mesopotamian languages, or any other relevant discipline, and it cites no peer-reviewed scholarly publications in any such discipline. The only Harvard degree von Ward claims to have earned is a Masters in Public Administration. The only evidence he cites to support his assertion that the Babylonians developed a heliocentric astronomy are Zechariah Sitchin's misreadings of ancient Sumerian texts. As far as I can tell, there are no genuine experts in ancient Sumerian who agree with Sitchin's readings, and, according to Otto Neugebauer, widely regarded during his lifetime as the world's leading expert on Babylonian mathematics and astronomy, the latter was most definitely not heliocentric.
David Wilson (talk · cont) 08:57, 14 December 2015 (UTC)

Columba's supposed vision of the orbit of the Earth[edit]

I have reverted the addition of the following text to the article:

"In Adomnan of Iona's biography of St Columba, Columba claims at one point that God granted him miraculous visions, including the ability to see 'the entire orbit of the whole Earth and the sea and the sky around it'.[23]"

because the expression "the entire orbit of the whole Earth" is a very poor translation of Adomnan's original Latin words "totum totius terrae orbem", which have nothing whatever to do with heliocentrism. A literal translation of "terrae orbis" would be "circle of land", but like the similar Latin expressions "orbis terrarum" and "gyrus terrae", it was a common expression used from classical times to refer either to the oikumene—i.e. the inhabited lands known to the ancients—or to the entire Earth. It cannot be reasonably interpreted as meaning the same thing as what "orbit of the Earth" would mean to a well-educated modern English speaker. In a translation of 1874, the words "totum totius terrae orbem" are rendered as "the whole compass of the world", and the meaning of this English version is undoubtedly very much closer to Adomnan's original. David Wilson (talk · cont) 08:18, 11 January 2016 (UTC)

Other translations of Adomnan's "totum totius terrae orbem" are:
Wentworh Huyshe (1900): "the entire circuit of the whole world."
Alan and Marjorie Anderson (1961); "the whole circle of the whole earth."
David Wilson (talk · cont) 05:39, 12 January 2016 (UTC)

astronomyfactbook.com[edit]

This website indicates in its terms of use that "Our websites includes a combination of content that we create, that our partners create, and that our users create." Such websites of non-attributed user created content are not suitable WP:RS. --Noren (talk) 20:34, 7 March 2016 (UTC)