Talk:Hermetic seal

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There should be more information about how airtight/hermetic seals are made possible in various applications? Dont spacesuits have her,metic seals? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 88.222.185.190 (talk) 19:01, 8 June 2010 (UTC)

References to Hermetic Seals in entertainment: Hermetic Helmet in Laser Lords. Aeronflux (talk) 17:41, 22 June 2010 (UTC)

Can someone discuss the hermeticity of plastics? It was mentioned that high-barrier plastics can be used to form a hermetic seal, but I think that needs citation and explanation. 155.13.48.8 (talk) 19:06, 10 August 2010 (UTC)

Problems w/ current intro and definition[edit]

The current introduction contains both grammatical problems and a circular definition. I am tempted to change it, but I don't know much about this topic and I came to this article to find out more about it. The current intro is:

A Hermetic seal, or the quality of being Airtight: is a seal or a condition which is considered reasonably or completely airtight.

The wording suggests that "hermetic seal" and "airtight" are equivalent, so what this really tells the reader is, "Hermetic seal = being airtight = being airtight." I'm tempted to say that most readers will have an intuitive sense of what it means to be airtight, but since airtight also redirects to this page, I think we also need to define this term. Incorporating some of the original language, I would suggest something along the lines of:

Having a hermetic seal means to have to the property of being reasonably or completely airtight.

Following this, there should be a brief discussion of what it means to be "reasonably or completely airtight," especially since people who do not already know what airtight means, and are therefore looking it up on Wikipedia, will be directed to this page. I would go ahead and change it now, but since I initially came here to find out what it means to be hermetically sealed, I don't feel comfortable changing the definition without at least opening it up to comment. I'm only assuming that the definition given is correct, and would like to clean it up a bit. However, I think I will fix the capitalization so it at least follows normal English capitalization rules.
--MYCETEAE - talk 08:39, 20 August 2010 (UTC)

I agree completely, and based on what you've written here, I think you're as competent as anybody else to add a short definition of the word airtight. I don't think that's the kind of edit that requires an expert in the field. Describing how an hermetic seal might be effected could require expert knowledge, but not a general definition of airtight. That's my opinion anyway.--Jim10701 (talk) 03:32, 21 August 2010 (UTC)

Flaky etymology[edit]

The Etymology and history section contains this absurd statement:

The word hermetic comes from the syncretism of the Greek god Hermes and the Egyptian Thoth [...]

The concept of hermeticism may indeed come from such a syncretism, but the word hermetic does not. Hermes alone gets that honor; Thoth's name appears nowhere in the word. I'm going to rewrite this sentence to separate the etymology of the word from the alleged (but unsubstantiated) origin of the concept.--Jim10701 (talk) 03:48, 21 August 2010 (UTC)

Also odd to think of an alembic still as being "airtight." That's a recipe for an explosion! Rather, alembic stills are open to the atmosphere, but in a very controlled way. Still--the opposite of "hermetic." --158.111.5.34 (talk) 21:38, 28 December 2010 (UTC)

Orphaned references in "Hermetic seal"[edit]

I check pages listed in Category:Pages with incorrect ref formatting to try to fix reference errors. One of the things I do is look for content for orphaned references in wikilinked articles. I have found content for some of Hermetic seal's orphans, the problem is that I found more than one version. I can't determine which (if any) is correct for this article, so I am asking for a sentient editor to look it over and copy the correct ref content into this article.

Reference named "joints":

I apologize if any of the above are effectively identical; I am just a simple computer program, so I can't determine whether minor differences are significant or not. AnomieBOT 04:20, 27 December 2012 (UTC)