Talk:High Hopes (Pink Floyd song)

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grammar[edit]

the second sentence needs some work. it appears as if two people wrote it.

Agreed and done! BTW, don't forget to log in and sign your comments, so we know where the good ideas are coming from. Wikipedia is somewhat more fun when you register your own account.
--Ben Culture (talk) 04:37, 23 April 2013 (UTC)

Fat Old Sun[edit]

Have edited the bit linking this song to Fat Old Sun. The latter is a very generic 'summery' piece and is not really autobiographical about Gilmour in anyway. At no point in FOS does Gilmour mention any specific place or person (other than himself)

The lyrics of "Fat Old Sun" sound just as "autobiographical" as this song, to me! But I see no reason to shove that into the article.
--Ben Culture (talk) 05:06, 23 April 2013 (UTC)

The bell in this sounds to me as if it runs the entire length of the song, not just the beginning and end. It seems to just become somewhat overshadowed by the louder other instruments. G. 15:13, 11 July 2006 (UTC)

I don't know about the studio version, but the version on the Pulse DVD it most certianly doesn't. It picks up again in the middle though at one point. -Graptor 66.161.205.26 13:16, 25 August 2006 (UTC)

Bring the Boys Back Home[edit]

The same drumbeat as in Bring the Boys Back Home is used in part of the song. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 83.253.167.142 (talk) 16:11, 10 November 2009 (UTC)

It's not exactly the same, just similar, otherwise that would REALLY be mentionable.
By the way, on "Bring the Boys Back Home", did you ever notice that the march beat in 4/4 continues after the song's one verse begins, though the verse is in 12/8? It's polyrhythmic. I think I'll go put that in that song's article, assuming it has its own.
--Ben Culture (talk) 04:40, 23 April 2013 (UTC)

Reminiscent of other songs[edit]

I think there should be a mention about how the part from 2:56 - 3:47 is reminiscent of several other Pink Floyd songs. Just offhand I can hear "Welcome to the Machine" and the drums are from something on The Wall.

Normally I would scoff at such a comment, but you are right about this one. That section is very much like "Welcome to the Machine", with the rising E minor scale. It's not an exact quote, more of an imitation. "High Hopes" goes E, F#, G, B, A, with the chords E minor and F, whereas "Welcome to the Machine" goes E, F#, G, A, B, with the chords E minor and C.
Because the majority of "High Hopes" is in a vastly different key (C minor, I think), this section stands out more.
As for the drums, I assume you're referring to "Bring the Boys Back Home"?
At any rate, yes, I think this is worth a mention, if it can be done tastefully.
--63.25.244.89 (talk) 17:13, 14 February 2008 (UTC)

Added song infobox[edit]

i Added a single infobox, as requested TommyStardust

Fair use rationale for Image:Highhopes.jpg[edit]

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Image:Highhopes.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images lacking such an explanation can be deleted one week after being tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot (talk) 19:33, 2 January 2008 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Highhopes01.jpg[edit]

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Image:Highhopes01.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images lacking such an explanation can be deleted one week after being tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot (talk) 19:33, 2 January 2008 (UTC)

Gilmour Interview[edit]

The Gilmour interview with Redbeard is (I think, not having listened to all of it) at http://www.inthestudio.net/, but as an audio track. Can one cite audio tracks, or is listening OR? Occuli (talk) 20:41, 3 June 2010 (UTC)

unsourced moved here:[edit]

Pink Floyd manager, Steve O'Rourke, who lobbied to be included on one of the group's albums, appears at the end with Gilmour's stepson, Charlie, who hangs up a telephone on O'Rourke.[original research?]

The beginning of "High Hopes" is reminiscent of another of his songs, "Fat Old Sun", from the Pink Floyd album Atom Heart Mother. Bells chime at the beginning of both pieces, for example.[original research?]

The bird sounds and fly buzzing can also be traced back to "Grantchester Meadows", a song from the 1969 Pink Floyd album, Ummagumma, written by Roger Waters.[original research?]

I'm a pretty big critic of Gilmour's post-Waters Floyd forgeries, but these last two items strike me as coincidences, or a desire to improve upon past work. Especially the fly part; I really doubt Gilmour remembers the details of "Grantchester Fucking Meadows" -- he wasn't even on the recording (although he did sing harmony on one rare live performance, in which his voice was much louder than Roger Waters's lead)! --Ben Culture (talk) 05:40, 23 April 2013 (UTC)

The song features a short guitar tacet, musically similar to a section of "Welcome to the Machine", from approximately 2:57 - 3:48.[original research?]

No, this one is not Original Research. To a musically-aware person, either a musician or just someone with a good ear, this is a natural observation. It wouldn't be unusual for someone to listen to the song for the first time and notice, "Hey, the key just changed dramatically to E minor", and notice the nylon-string guitar sliding up the E minor scale, note by note, E - F# - G. However, it doesn't necessarily need to be in our article. There are enough differences ("High Hopes" goes E - F# - G - B, whereas "Machine" goes E - F# - G - A; the chords to "High Hopes" goes from E minor to F major, whereas "Machine" goes from E minor to C major seventh; et cetera) that the similarities seem coincidental. If this was one of Gilmour's musical collaborations, I wouldn't be surprised if the outsider (Moore, Carin, etc.) had written it. --Ben Culture (talk) 05:40, 23 April 2013 (UTC)

This being the very last song that Pink Floyd has written to date (and its placement at the end of their last album of new material to date) lends itself to the interpretation that the song narrates the story of the band's career, from their beginnings to their grandiose success (with The Dark Side of the Moon and The Wall) to their breakup to their carrying on. The final line ("The endless river, forever and ever") ties into one of the band's first hits, "See Emily Play" ("Float on a river, forever and ever").[original research?]

This, on the other hand, is a pretty good example of original thought. Only the last line about last lines ("Forever and ever") comes off as a natural observation instead of original thought. --Ben Culture (talk) 05:40, 23 April 2013 (UTC)

Live performance ... pre-recorded "Forever and ever"[edit]

The last line of the song, "Forever and ever", is pretty clearly a pre-recording in the live version seen on the Pulse DVD. After the second-to-last lyric, "The endless river", after 5:10 on the DVD, we see Gilmour step away from his microphone stand and get seated behind his lap steel guitar while the last line plays. I think I could just put that last sentence verbatim into the article. So I'm going to. I just want it understand that this is not an implication that Gilmour was unable to sing the lyric live; he's not a poor singer by any means. It was just a question of logistics. If anything, to me it makes the performance MORE magical, to have synched-up recordings play during the song. Just like Roger Waters used pre-recorded "echoes" in songs like "Stop" and other Wall songs. I think it's extremely cool.

--Ben Culture (talk) 05:26, 23 April 2013 (UTC)