Talk:Hindi Belt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject India / Geography (Rated Stub-class, Low-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject India, which aims to improve Wikipedia's coverage of India-related topics. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Low  This article has been rated as Low-importance on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the Indian geography workgroup (marked as Low-importance).


Most Pakistanis living in the UK speak Urdu, and their families are often from Lahore and Karachi. Yet no part of Pakistan (save for a small strip over Sindh) is covered by the red area of the map in this article - and certainly not Lahore or Karachi. Why? BigSteve (talk) 12:37, 9 February 2013 (UTC)

The red area is where Hindi languages are spoken natively. The native language of Lahore is Punjabi, and that of Karachi is Sindhi. After partition (and even before), a lot of Urdu-speaking Muslims moved to Pakistan, where they can be found in all major cities. Coloring in those cities because they now have Urdu speakers would be like coloring in London because it has Urdu speakers. — kwami (talk) 22:03, 9 February 2013 (UTC)
Brilliant, thanks for the explanation! BigSteve (talk) 12:31, 10 February 2013 (UTC)
But what if Hindi or Urdu is spoken by someone born in London? Isn't it spoken "natively"? Or if not, when was the cutoff year, so a language arriving earlier is "native", later: not "native"? Remember, English is also an imported language that evolved from a dialect of German, brought by immigrants after the Romans left Britain. (talk) 15:41, 23 March 2015 (UTC)

Why is Nepali excluded?[edit]

There is the saying, "A language is a dialect with an army and navy". Is this why Nepali is not categorized as a member of the Hindi family while other Pahari languages are? LADave (talk) 19:02, 17 January 2014 (UTC)

Hindi is a cultural concept, not a linguistic one. Nepali was never considered Hindi. I would guess that's because Nepal was not part of India, but I don't really know. BTW, Dogri is no longer considered Hindi, because it's become its own official language. — kwami (talk) 21:50, 17 January 2014 (UTC)


Is Hindi in the inclusive sense of this article a Macrolanguage? LADave (talk) 19:05, 17 January 2014 (UTC)

Conceptually, I suppose so, though it isn't actually one in the sense that there's no ISO code for it. "Macrolanguage" isn't a linguistic concept, it's an attempt to address naming and coding problems when sociolinguistic and cladistic definitions of language clash. Dogri-Kangri is coded as a macrolanguage, and that used to be part of Hindi; Rajasthani is as well, and it still is considered Hindi (or at least parts of Rajasthani: Marwari is a separate macrolanguage). — kwami (talk) 21:56, 17 January 2014 (UTC)

Map Issues[edit]

2001.hindi.majority.png may be controversial as it shows J&K. Such maps are banned in India.

We should use

States in India by their official language.

— Preceding unsigned comment added by PradeepBoston (talkcontribs) 14:19, 27 August 2015 (UTC)