Talk:Hindu Kush

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Request for a link to the cannabis meaning[edit]

I happened upon this page looking for more information on the Hindu Kush cannabis. Nothing here. Rather, I found sources elsewhere, such as http://www.wikileaf.com/strain/hindu-kush/. Could someone please do us a favor and add a "See also" link for the cannabis one? Thank you! 68.118.175.12 (talk) 23:30, 7 March 2015 (UTC)

You mean like a disclaimer? Do we have such an article anyways? AcidSnow (talk) 00:37, 8 March 2015 (UTC)
Like what we see at top of articles. This one has one, i.e.,
"Hindukush" redirects here. For the village in Iran, see Hindukush, Iran.
If there is no such an article for the cannabis one, it should be created. 216.115.1.67 (talk) 20:31, 10 March 2015 (UTC)


Edit in Section Origin of the Name[edit]

My edit was undone again. I wonder why does the editor not argue out on the points raised rather than surreptitiously undoing edits? Even on this talk page, enough on Ibn Battuta has been said, which supports my contention. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Puruvara (talkcontribs) 08:22, 13 May 2015 (UTC)

This entire para: However, such a derivation is strongly challenged by historical documents, such as the one found in the writings of 14th century explorer Ibn Battutah, who explains that the words "Hindu Kush" refer to the harsh meteorological conditions and frost that was responsible for the death of many local travellers in that region. At the time, the word Hindu was a secular term which was used to describe all inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent – or Hindustan – irrespective of their religious affiliation. It was only towards the end of the 18th century that European merchants and colonists referred collectively to the followers of some Indian religions as Hindus.

..is a generic conclusion / set of observations, not supported by any documentary evidence and moreover, is just wrong

Hindu Kush" refer to the harsh meteorological conditions and frost - this is grossly incorrect. An analogy would be 'Cape of Good hope' refers to harsh sea conditions and sea monsters

What Ibn Batuta actually speaks is what Encylcopedia Americana has said. Further, the only voluntary movement through Hindukush in India was of the Turkic invaders and any outward movement of Indians was mostly forced. In anycase, if only travellers were getting killed, that would have included the Turks and in fact more of them. The mountains would have been called something else then.

At the time, the word Hindu was a secular term which was used to describe all inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent – or Hindustan – irrespective of their religious affiliation. It was only towards the end of the 18th century that European merchants and colonists referred collectively to the followers of some Indian religions as Hindus.

The above is simply not related to the topic and carries even more infirmities.

Secularism, as a concept, was introduced in India through the British rule. To imagine that medieval invaders or even Indians themselves would use the word in a 'secular' sense is simply not logical. But more importantly, as the line itself says, while all the Indians may not have called themselves Hindus, the external world, Arabia, Persia and Central Asia identified all Indians as Hindus. So, the mountain, crossing of which resulted in killing of slaves captured from the Hind, was naturally called Slayer of the Hindus.

Lastly, the sentence regarding European Merchants etc defining Hindus is again incorrect as at least by the early Mughal times, Hindus had adopted the foreign terminology to identify themselves. E.g. Guru Nanak and Kabir's dohas, Rana Pratap's letter, Shivaji's edicts and even before that decrees of the later Vijayanagar kings.

In any case, this is a topic on Hindukush, not the origin of the term Hindu. And if it were, it is all the more important to remove suppositions.

— Preceding unsigned comment added by Puruvara (talkcontribs) 18:10, 12 May 2015 (UTC)

I find hard to believe that nobody mentions that the most obvious etymology for 'Hindu Kush' is its ancient (and modern) Greek name "Ινδικός Καύκασος", which simply means "Indian Caucasus". — Preceding unsigned comment added by 195.64.172.4 (talk) 06:43, 21 February 2017 (UTC)

@195.64.172.4: Welcome to wikipedia. Please see no original research and reliable sources content guidelines. All sorts of fringe theories can be proposed, such as anachronistically writing the phrase in Inuktikut or Incan script, but it would be undue for this article. Ms Sarah Welch (talk) 13:36, 21 February 2017 (UTC)

Hindū Kūh and Kūh-e Hind[edit]

I have not been able to find a source to support the (slightly ungrammatical) claim in the Origin of name section:
"Hindū Kūh (ھندوکوه) and Kūh-e Hind (کوهِ ھند) usually applied to the entire range separating the basins of the Kabul and Helmand Rivers from that of the Amu Darya, or, more specifically, to that part of the range lying northwest of Kabul."
Can someone show sources that use those names in the way indicated in the sentence? Apuldram (talk) 15:49, 9 February 2016 (UTC)

@Apuldram: I removed it, the tag has been pending for a long while. Ms Sarah Welch (talk) 23:36, 10 December 2016 (UTC)
I also added many more scholarly sources to the section. James Wynbrandt, for example, is a professor of Middle East Studies and Politics. Ms Sarah Welch (talk) 23:50, 10 December 2016 (UTC)