Talk:History of Hinduism

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
          This article is of interest to the following WikiProjects:
WikiProject Hinduism (Rated C-class, Top-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Hinduism, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Hinduism on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Top  This article has been rated as Top-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject India (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject India, which aims to improve Wikipedia's coverage of India-related topics. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 
WikiProject Religion  
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Religion, a project to improve Wikipedia's articles on Religion-related subjects. Please participate by editing the article, and help us assess and improve articles to good and 1.0 standards, or visit the wikiproject page for more details.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 

Context[edit]

I've removed this piece of "info":

"The spread of Hinduism to the west is taken out of its context of origin. For this reason little attention has been paid to its Indian roots. The spread of Hinduism to the West can be contributed with the West's interest in mysticism and modernity. Many Western critics of Christianity have began to explore religions such as Hinduism." (source: Altglas, Véronique. "The Global Diffusion And Westernization Of Neo-Hindu Movements: Siddha Yoga And Sivananda Centres." Religions Of South Asia 1.2 (2007): 217-237. ATLA Religion Database with ATLASerials. Web. 10 Feb. 2015.)
  • Is "the spread of Hinduism" taken out of its context? I guess you mean that the Yogic practices which are promoted by Sivananda Centres and Siddha Yoga are taken out of their context. And that's only two movements, which promote a specific aspect of Hinduism c.q. Indian culture. You can't generalize that to "Hinduism".
  • "for this reason" - that's not an explanation. Why was it taken out of its context? How? By who? The explanation is that those teachingswere adapted to a western context of "religious individualism, inner-worldly orientations, relativism and subjectivism about beliefs, and pragmatism." (Altglas p.217) (With other words: 'leave me alone in my beautiful backyard with my peacefull Buddha-statues, and don't bother me with the pain of the world.' Aaargh!!!! that's not spirituality, that's hedonism. Become a Hotei or a Hakuin, smash the Buddha-statues, tear down the fench, and get into the world to help those who are in pain! (sorry, personal comment. @Bladesmulti: what's it like to see children sleep at the street? Does yoga help to comfort those kids?)
  • "The spread of Hinduism to the West can be contributed with the West's interest in mysticism and modernity" - and how is that to be contributed to "the West's interest in mysticism and modernity"? It's like saying "The selling of oranges is to be contributed to the interest in buying oranges". And "the West's interest in modernism" is a non-sensical statement; is there some place ouside "the West" where modernism is propagated, and "the West" took it over?
  • "Many Western critics of Christianity have began to explore religions such as Hinduism" - "many" is vague; what are "western critics of Christianity"?; what is "begun to explore"?
  • "religions such as Hinduism" - what other religions, besides Hinduism? And what is "the religion Hinduism"? "Hinduism" is extremely broad! This "info" is meaningless, unless you provide a context: everbody knows there's a huge interest in the west in yoga and meditation.

Joshua Jonathan -Let's talk! 06:09, 11 February 2015 (UTC)

Moving info[edit]

The Hinduism article contains quite detailed info on the history of Hinduism. I'm going tot ry to move some of it to this article. To do so, I've "synchronised" the periodisation of both articles. Best regards, Joshua Jonathan -Let's talk! 08:42, 13 February 2015 (UTC)

harvnb[edit]

@Kautilya3: why harvnb? diff Joshua Jonathan -Let's talk! 21:15, 23 September 2015 (UTC)

To have one-level footnotes as far as possible. We can turn pop-ups for one level, not beyond that. - Kautilya3 (talk) 21:51, 23 September 2015 (UTC)
I copied the sources from Hinduism and cleared the conflicts. The following citations are still missing:
  • Gombrich 1996 - first edition of Gombrich 2006? what about page numbers?
  • nath 2001 - Yes check.svg Done
  • Zimmer 1989 - Reprint of Zimmer 1951? page numbers match?
  • King 1999 - There is a King 1999-B, but is it the same?
  • Scheepers 2000
  • Roosen 2006
  • Sharf 1995-A - same as Sharf 1995?
I still can't get sfn blue-links to work. I suspect the 2-level footnotes are blocking them. - Kautilya3 (talk) 22:05, 23 September 2015 (UTC)
Most of the blue-links to the full citations are working. Flood 1996 and Michaels 2004 (the two crucial ones!) don't work. I have no idea why. - Kautilya3 (talk) 23:54, 23 September 2015 (UTC)
YES!!!! The table! That's the problem. It used to be a template, but thanks to a banned user that templated was removed. Joshua Jonathan -Let's talk! 04:37, 24 September 2015 (UTC)

────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────

History of Hinduism
James Mill (1773–1836), in his The History of British India (1817),[a] distinguished three phases in the history of India, namely Hindu, Muslim and British civilisations.[b][c] This periodisation has been influential, but has also been criticised, for the misconceptions it has given rise to.[d] Another influential periodisation is the division into "ancient, classical, mediaeval and modern periods".[e]
Smart[f] Michaels
(overall)[g]
Michaels
(detailed)[h]
Muesse[i] Flood[j]
Indus Valley Civilisation and Vedic period
(c. 3000–1000 BCE)
Prevedic religions
(until c. 1750 BCE)[k]
Prevedic religions
(until c. 1750 BCE)[l]
Indus Valley Civilization
(3300–1400 BCE)
Indus Valley Civilisation
(c. 2500 to 1500 BCE)
Vedic religion
(c. 1750–500 BCE)
Early Vedic Period
(c. 1750–1200 BCE)
Vedic Period
(1600–800 BCE)
Vedic period
(c. 1500–500 BCE)
Middle Vedic Period
(from 1200 BCE)
Pre-classical period
(c. 1000 BCE – 100 CE)
Late Vedic period
(from 850 BCE)
Classical Period
(800–200 BCE)
Ascetic reformism
(c. 500–200 BCE)
Ascetic reformism
(c. 500–200 BCE)
Epic and Puranic period
(c. 500 BCE to 500 CE)
Classical Hinduism
(c. 200 BCE – 1100 CE)[m]
Preclassical Hinduism
(c. 200 BCE – 300 CE)[n]
Epic and Puranic period
(200 BCE – 500 CE)
Classical period
(c. 100 – 1000 CE)
"Golden Age" (Gupta Empire)
(c. 320–650 CE)[o]
Late-Classical Hinduism
(c. 650–1100 CE)[p]
Medieval and Late Puranic Period
(500–1500 CE)
Medieval and Late Puranic Period
(500–1500 CE)
Hindu-Islamic civilisation
(c. 1000–1750 CE)
Islamic rule and "Sects of Hinduism"
(c. 1100–1850 CE)[q]
Islamic rule and "Sects of Hinduism"
(c. 1100–1850 CE)[r]
Modern Age
(1500–present)
Modern period
(c. 1500 CE to present)
Modern period
(c. 1750 CE – present)
Modern Hinduism
(from c. 1850)[s]
Modern Hinduism
(from c. 1850)[t]

This is what that table-template used to be. Joshua Jonathan -Let's talk! 04:42, 24 September 2015 (UTC)

Ironic. When we want a reference to become harvard, it doesn't become one. When we don't want it, it becomes one automatically! These computers! - Kautilya3 (talk) 11:35, 24 September 2015 (UTC)
Ok, according to Template:Harvard citation#Reference section, citation automatically becomes harvard, but other forms of cite don't. Will you learn that, Joshua Jonathan? :-) - Kautilya3 (talk) 11:48, 24 September 2015 (UTC)
No sir, I'll first have to study on that. I'm an old man; I function on routine. Joshua Jonathan -Let's talk! 12:03, 24 September 2015 (UTC)

Actual Period[edit]

Hello all! This article talks about everything except origins of Hinduism. As I was reading, I came to know about iron age, vedic culture and everything else but got confused about origins of Hinduism reading this. Can anyone please help me out here? I want to know origins of Hinduism (year and place) Rachnajainrj (talk) 17:57, 30 September 2015 (UTC)

"After the Vedic period, between 500-200 BCE and c. 300 CE", northern India. Joshua Jonathan -Let's talk! 20:09, 30 September 2015 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just added archive links to 2 external links on History of Hinduism. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true to let others know.

Question? Archived sources still need to be checked

Cheers.—cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 21:58, 13 February 2016 (UTC)


Sources for "called the oldest religion in the world"[edit]

Note that I'm only challenging the sources. 1st is a "Religion for Dummies" by two authors well known in the media as the "God Squad", who also wrote Bad Stuff in the News: A Guide to Handling the Headlines. Nice guys I'm sure but not religion historians.

2nd is a book by Anthony Stevens (Jungian analyst), even less qualified for this.

3rd - D.S. Sarma - who has written quite a bit about Hinduism but history of religion isn't his field either.[1]

4th - Merriam Webster, seems to be the dictionary in the sources, not an RS.

5th Klaus Klostermaier - excellent source.

6th. Gary Laderman - religious historian but of American religion.[2]

and finally Turner's book 'Encyclopedia of relationships across the lifespan[3], not a reliable source for this subject either, he's not a religious historian and the book isn't about religious history.

I'd suggest dumping all but Klostermaier and finding sources by religious historians.

I only came here because at Timeline of religion an editor is using these sources and apparently dating Himduism to 9831 BC. Doug Weller talk 13:53, 8 May 2016 (UTC)