Talk:History of Rhode Island

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Untitled[edit]

I think that we should either merge this page with Rhode Island, or remove the very long history section in that article. --Ehburrus 01:46, 2 October 2006 (UTC)

Boundaries[edit]

A longer explanation of how the boundaries of the state were established would be informative. In particular, it seems that at some point Bristol County, Rhode Island was transferred from Massachusetts. -- Beland 02:09, 27 November 2006 (UTC)

I'm working on this now. See also History of Massachusetts. -- Beland 17:43, 15 October 2007 (UTC)

Demographics of settlers[edit]

This story says that "Baptists founded Rhode Island". The article does not really clearly characterize the religious affiliation of the founders. If it's possible to do that for Williams and Hutchinson, or for other groups of immigrants at various times (and for later immigrants, their countries of origin), that would be informative. -- Beland 22:20, 29 December 2006 (UTC)

Contradictions[edit]

This article is contradicted by [1], which says that Warwick already existed by 1642, and in that year the four towns of Providence, Warwick, Portsmouth, and Newport were united under a single charter. It would probably be useful to refer to actual history books for a more detailed explanation which can be properly summarized here. -- Beland 17:50, 15 October 2007 (UTC)

The Native American Indian group lived in Rhode Island is the Narragansett.They lived on the west side of Narragansett Bay.They hunted, fished, grew corn,and veggies.(174.55.18.94 (talk) 22:12, 28 January 2010 (UTC))

Population[edit]

I suggest replacing the population statistics with one that has the state only. The others, collected, just seem strange to me and don't really "prove" or demonstrate anything IMO.

It could be replaced with the historical one from the Rhode Island article. Or maybe, fork Demographics from there and link to it from here. Student7 (talk) 18:41, 27 March 2011 (UTC)

copied table from RI article and replaced the unusual one. Student7 (talk) 02:17, 30 March 2011 (UTC)

King Philip[edit]

Is there any source for the claim that Metacomet was nick-named King Philip by British colonists? The word nick-name implies it wasn't a serious royal title with a Christian given name, whereas British accounts of exploration from the period speak of numerous kings and royals in North America. Why are we to believe this was not a respectful title used by the colonists? If a source can't be provided, I suggest a neutral term be used, something along the lines of "(his British appellation, his native name being Metacomet)". Hypatea (talk) 13:00, 4 August 2012 (UTC)

Metacomet was given the name "King Philip" by his colonist teachers, (says Hine & Faragher 2000 p 63) Metacomet adopted the name -- possibly it was more like making fun of him (like giving fancy Roman names to slaves). "Chief" of "Sachem" were more exact and more honorific. see Jill Lepore (1999). The Name of War: King Philip's War and the Origins of American Identity. p. 20.  Note that England had a King Philip not long before in 1554-58-- ie Philip II of Spain the Spanish Catholic king who was husband of Queen Mary I ("Bloody Mary")-- and he was greatly hated and vilified. Rjensen (talk) 13:24, 4 August 2012 (UTC)

The Constitution[edit]

I recall reading somewhere that RI, as the last holdout for ratification, claimed that it WAS the United States, since it was the only state faithful to the Articles of Confederation, which by its own terms could be amended only by unanimous ratification. If true, it's amusing, but I'm unsure if it would be a useful addition to the article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Dynzmoar (talkcontribs) 16:33, 23 February 2014 (UTC)

Bloodless Revolution[edit]

I saw in an article (about a current scandal involving the Speaker of the House) an intriguing mention of a "Bloodless Revolution" (proper name) that "remains one of the most significant power transfers in history". Maybe the author was being a bit hyperbolic, but this article's current content includes only a passing reference to this "Bloodless Revolution" that sounds like a fairly dramatic event that, by implication of its virtual absence, no Wikipedia editors have yet found important enough to fully include or even discuss here on the talk page. Anyone out there willing to write a paragraph or so about this event? (NPOV, of course, and preferably with cited references). ~ Jeff Q (talk) 06:18, 22 March 2014 (UTC)

It's mentioned over at the Theodore F. Green page, too. Can't say I had heard of it and there are zero sources cited on either page about it. I added two, but there's more from each that could be added to develop this. --— Rhododendrites talk |  15:01, 22 March 2014 (UTC)