Talk:History of organic farming

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neutrality disputed[edit]

I have re-written only the first paragraph. The entire article is systematically biased in favor of "organic" methods and needs correction/ revision. --Zeamays 03:06, 25 July 2006 (UTC)

zeamays comment moved by trueblood: Note: This article is written by advocates of "organic" agriculture and is systematically biased against conventional methods of farming. To eliminate the bias, this article needs to be re-written. It is also written in the peculiar terminology of "organic" devotees, and so it also needs re-writing to agree with modern scientific terminology. Also, the connection of many of the early advocates of "organic" agriculture to vitalistic philosophy is not adequate discussed or its many critics mentioned.

notes like this belong in the discussion page not the article. --trueblood 21:06, 25 July 2006 (UTC) It is also largely the history of the organic movement, which began as a cult philosophy deriving from vitalism, and later expanded to become a cause of certain elite groups, particularly celebrity chefs i reverted this because it is not neutral, please don't argue, show this wording to someone else at wikipedia and ask them what they think. with cult philosophy deriving from vitalism you probably mean biodynamics. it is one way of putting it but not quite as it should be in an encyclopedia. and really there is more to organics than just cultists and celebrity chefs. --trueblood 21:12, 25 July 2006 (UTC)

Mr. Trueblood: I have placed a "NPOV" ticket on the article, since you have insisted on removing my warnings about bias. Please do not remove the "NPOV" ticket. My views are no more argumentative than the text of this highly biased article, which is written as though all of the claims of the movement are correct. --Zeamays 14:58, 26 July 2006 (UTC)

um , how about responding to what i said? --trueblood 15:47, 26 July 2006 (UTC) i am going to remove the tag if you don't have any actual reasons, why it should stay. by that i mean point out biased passages. remember this article is about the history of organic farming.

doesn't present much on the evolution of its acceptance[edit]

This article currently seems to be basically a timeline of organic-farming advocacy, which is information but not all the relevant information. In particular, there has been a marked shift in organic farming's perception in the scientific community: in the 1950s it was mostly considered to be "back-to-nature" pseudoscience and associated with folks like Rudolf Steiner; see, for example, Martin Gardner's criticism of organic farming in his influential Fads and Fallacies in the Name of Science (1952). By the 1980s and especially 1990s it had been gaining more mainstream acceptance, and its proponents were becoming increasingly mainstream (e.g. university professors), with a lot of gray-area transition in between. Currently none of this is covered. --Delirium 02:09, 18 August 2007 (UTC)

The answer to that is easy. Organic is not biodynamic. Organic is science based and always was science based. Biodynamic wasn't. That's why the "Father of Organic" is Howard and not Steiner. Howard was a scientist. The fact that a scientist can investigate non-scientific methods to incorporate into his own scientific development of agriculture does not in any way mean that method he developed is not scientific. Howard developed the original organic agriculture, and coined the term "organic" as it applies to agricultural methods. NOT Steiner. Redddbaron (talk) 18:52, 30 April 2013 (UTC)

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