Talk:History of the Internet

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Former good article History of the Internet was one of the Engineering and technology good articles, but it has been removed from the list. There are suggestions below for improving the article to meet the good article criteria. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
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Semi-protected edit request on 17 March 2015[edit]

78.157.25.29 (talk) 13:32, 17 March 2015 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: as you have not requested a change.
If you want to suggest a change, please request this in the form "Please replace XXX with YYY" or "Please add ZZZ between PPP and QQQ".
Please also cite reliable sources to back up your request, without which no information should be added to, or changed in, any article. - Arjayay (talk) 13:58, 17 March 2015 (UTC)

Recent edit in lead section[edit]

I believe the recent additon to the first sentence of the fourth paragraph of the lead section is unclear and poorly worded, it also seems to conflate the Internet with the World Wide Web. I have begun by removing the unnecessary "thus" and "hence", but I am not completely sure exactly what the author means in the first sentence so I am not sure what alternate wording to suggest, or if the sentence indeed belongs in the lead at all. --HarryHenryGebel (talk) 05:27, 21 March 2015 (UTC)

Who was first?[edit]

I just reverted two edits by User:Twobells. The version before Twobells' changes read:

Packet switching networks such as ARPANET, Mark I at NPL in the UK, CYCLADES, Merit Network, Tymnet, and Telenet, were developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s using a variety of communications protocols. The ARPANET in particular led to the development of protocols for internetworking, in which multiple separate networks could be joined into a network of networks.

The version after Twobells' changes read:

Packet switching networks such as ARPANET, Mark I at NPL in the UK, CYCLADES, Merit Network, Tymnet, and Telenet, were developed in the late 1960s and early 1970s using a variety of communications protocols. Donald Davies was the first to put theory into practice by designing a packet-switched network at the National Physics Laboratory in the UK, the first of its kind in the world and the cornerstone for UK research for almost two decades. [1] Following, ARPANET further led to the development of protocols for internetworking, in which multiple separate networks could be joined into a network of networks.
  1. ^ Data Communications at the National Physical Laboratory (1965-1975) IEEE Annals of the History of Computing, Volume 9 Issue 3-4, Pages 221-247, Martin Campbell-Kelly.|http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/login.jsp?tp=&arnumber=4640566&url=http%3A%2F%2Fieeexplore.ieee.org%2Fxpls%2Fabs_all.jsp%3Farnumber%3D4640566%7Caccessdate=18 May 2015|

We are now back to the original version without twobells' changes. According to the ARPANET article the first APRANET messages were exchanged in October 1969. The abstract to the article that twobells' cited (I don't have access to the full article) includes this sentence: "The report focuses on the construction of the NPL Data Communications Network, which first became operational in 1970." Given this, I think it is best to avoid claims about who was "first". --Jeff Ogden (W163) (talk) 04:08, 19 May 2015 (UTC)

No-one is trying to create a 'who was first' argument, all I was doing was correcting the chronology, the network at NPL created by Davies was both the first packet-switched network and the first such network described so. The NPL DCN wasn't the first network just a larger version of the original which was created in 1966. One notable source is Yates' insighftul work 'Turing's Legacy: A History of Computing at the National Physical Laboratory 1945-1995' [1] page 117
  1. ^ Turings Legacy Computing Laboratory (1945-1995) "Turing's Legacy: A History of Computing at the National Physical Laboratory 1945-1995", Pages 126-146, David M. Yates|url=https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=ToMfAQAAIAAJ |accessdate=19 May 2015|
--Twobellst@lk 12:15, 19 May 2015 (UTC)
It is hard to avoid a "who is first" argument with the wording "Donald Davies was the first to put theory into practice by designing a packet-switched network at the National Physics Laboratory in the UK ...". It seems as if there are two NPL networks being mentioned at different points in the article and one of them became operational in 1970 (see the sub-section on NPL a little further on in the article). If that is the case, we need to make that clear since right now the article seems to contradict itself. Perhaps this more detailed information doesn't belong in the lead, but could be put into the sub-section on NPL instead. It would also be good to include a specific date or at least the year when "Davies put theory into practice". --Jeff Ogden (W163) (talk) 13:31, 19 May 2015 (UTC)

History including INWG 39, vote to base Internet on INWG 96, etc[edit]

The article should include the work of the International Packet Network Working Group (INWG). It should include the 1975 consensus to use the INWG 96 protocol by Cerf, Scantlebury, Zimmermann, and McKenzie, that resulted from "Pouzin and Cerf issued INWG 85 calling for a vote by mail on an End-To-End Protocol to be forwarded to standards bodies.". Then cover the subsequent move by Kahn and DARPA to base the Internet on the older INWG 39, which had been part of the basis for INWG 96. See IEEE Annals of the History of Computing (Vol 33, No 1, pp 66-71,) INWG and the Conception of the Internet: An Eyewitness Account, and The Internet's First Turning Point - High Tech Forum ★NealMcB★ (talk) 16:48, 24 July 2015 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just added archive links to 2 external links on History of the Internet. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true to let others know.

N Archived sources still need to be checked

Cheers. —cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 07:54, 26 August 2015 (UTC)

digital[edit]

please change ((digital)) to ((Digital data|digital))

Yes check.svg Done - thanks for the suggestion - Arjayay (talk) 16:02, 5 September 2015 (UTC)

Removal of Illustration - Inaccurate Information[edit]

I removed an illustration which purported to show a history of web browsers in the article. The illustration stated that the World Wide Web was invented by Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau in 1991. This is untrue. Tim Berners-Lee was the sole inventor of the Web in March 1989. Robert Cailliau was an enthusiastic supporter. Please see link to Tim Berners-Lee's own web page at the World Wide Web Consortium -

https://www.w3.org/People/Berners-Lee/

"Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web in 1989. He founded and Directs the World Wide Consortium (W3C) the forum for technical development of the Web. He founded the Web Foundation whose mission is that the WWW serves Humanity, and co-founded the Open Data Institute in London. His research group at MIT's Computer Science and AI Lab ("CSAIL") plans to re-decentralize the Web. Tim spends a lot of time fighting for rights such as privacy, freedom and openness of the Web."

And CERN articles -

http://home.web.cern.ch/topics/birth-web

"Tim Berners-Lee, a British scientist at CERN, invented the World Wide Web (WWW) in 1989. The web was originally conceived and developed to meet the demand for automatic information-sharing between scientists in universities and institutes around the world.

The first website at CERN - and in the world - was dedicated to the World Wide Web project itself and was hosted on Berners-Lee's NeXT computer. The website described the basic features of the web; how to access other people's documents and how to set up your own server. The NeXT machine - the original web server - is still at CERN. As part of the project to restore the first website, in 2013 CERN reinstated the world's first website to its original address."

http://home.web.cern.ch/about/updates/2014/03/world-wide-web-born-cern-25-years-ago

(CERN article from 2014 celebrating 25 years since the invention of the Web)

"In March 1989 Tim Berners-Lee, a scientist working at CERN, submitted a proposal to develop a radical new way of linking and sharing information over the internet. The document was entitled Information Management: A Proposal (link is external). And so the web was born." — Preceding unsigned comment added by Etheldavis (talkcontribs) 19:23, 13 September 2015 (UTC) (Etheldavis (talk) 19:27, 13 September 2015 (UTC))

Bill Nye for National Science Foundation[edit]

Internet by Bill Nye for National Science Foundation

Suggested file to add to this article. — Cirt (talk) 17:02, 6 October 2015 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just added archive links to 2 external links on History of the Internet. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

When you have finished reviewing my changes, please set the checked parameter below to true to let others know.

N Archived sources still need to be checked

Cheers. —cyberbot IITalk to my owner:Online 23:29, 15 October 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 11 November 2015[edit]

The internet was made in 1990s And remains popular to the younger generations to society, especially porn hub

139.130.58.154 (talk) 02:06, 11 November 2015 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: Assuming good faith, this is unimportant/trival. -- ferret (talk) 15:32, 11 November 2015 (UTC)

Netday '95-2004[edit]

I was thinking that NetDay should be mentioned in the article, since it helped contribute towards the Internet's growth. Netday was an event established in 1995 by then President Bill Clinton and Vice President Al Gore to connect schools, libraries, and clinics worldwide to the Internet by the year 2000. President Clinton once said, "I'm proud to have been the President who brought the White House into the digital age. When I became President, there were just 50 websites on the World Wide Web. Now there are 17 million and almost 50 million households online in the United States alone" (Presidential Libraries; July 8, 2000). --Marioluigi98 (talk) 15:12, 22 November 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 14 December 2015[edit]

I don't know who wrote this, but I think this section is highly suspect in this section "World Wide Web and introduction of browsers"

>> The explosion in popularity of the Web was triggered in September 1993 by NCSA Mosaic, <<

There was no "explosion in popularity" of the Internet until two factors happened. Browers, yes, but ISPs were also in short supply for household consumers. Ironically an earlier text "NSFNET was decommissioned in 1995, removing the last restrictions on the use of the Internet to carry commercial traffic" hit on the actual cause of the Internet boom. And to my mind no other factor made this take full effect than in the summer of 1995 AOL made the World Wide Web accessible via their internal browser. AOL had millions of users at this point and it was this availability of the net that drove new ISPs into being. The fact that AOL is only mentioned once on this page is tragic.

Here is a suggestion on how it should read:

A boost in web users was triggered in September 1993 by NCSA Mosaic, a graphical browser which eventually ran on several popular office and home computers.[65] This was the first web browser aiming to bring multimedia content to non-technical users, and therefore included images and text on the same page, unlike previous browser designs;[66] its founder, Marc Andreessen, also established the company that in 1994, released Netscape Navigator, which resulted in one of the early browser wars, when it ended up in a competition for dominance (which it lost) with Microsoft Windows' Internet Explorer. Finally in 1995 with the commercial use restrictions lifted, popular online service America Online (AOL) offered their users a connection to the Internet via their own internal browser.

73.48.160.137 (talk) 22:58, 14 December 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 23 December 2015[edit]

More mention of BBS systems is required (60,000 BBS's with 17 million users by 1994). BBS operators became the first ISPs. Jack Rickard was seminal, etc. Humanismws (talk) 18:09, 23 December 2015 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done for now: @Humanismws: Okay, where would we find this information to add it? Please provide a source. Discuss-Dubious (t/c) 22:52, 30 December 2015 (UTC)