Talk:Horse-drawn vehicle

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[Untitled][edit]

There seems to be a fair amount of overlap between this page and the 'carriage' page. Would a merge be in order? 86.129.227.193 13:59, 16 May 2007 (UTC)

Right-hand/left-hand drive[edit]

Which side does the driver of a horse-drawn vehicle sit? Is it the same as a motor vehicle? Is it the same for trade and faster vehicles?

In the UK nowadays, horse drivers seem to sit on the right, as in motor vehicles. However, I'm sure I've seen old pictures of wagons where the driver sat on the left – presumably this would make mounting the vehicle safer in traffic, and perhaps allow the driver to see the edge of the road better (these were vehicles without driving seats). Perhaps sitting on the off-side is for high-speed overtaking? --Richard New Forest (talk) 23:11, 29 February 2008 (UTC)

I honestly don't really know; I haven't paid much attention on those times when there has ben two people sitting up front in a wagon, most driving I am around has just a single driver who sits in the middle. Maybe it's per USA and UK useage and they swich sides with traffic? I'm sue there is a rule on it somewhere, wish I was more up on these things. Montanabw(talk) 07:21, 1 March 2008 (UTC)
Just had a look at some photos of a governess cart we used to have. This had knee cut-outs to help the driver to twist forward to drive (governess carts have inward-facing bench seats, and are driven sitting at the back so the governess can keep an eye on her charges and they can't reach the door at the rear). There is a cut-out on each side, showing that it was designed to be driven from either side. It must have been built between about 1890 and 1930. I think I've seen governess carts with only one cut-out, but I can't remember which side it was on... Richard New Forest (talk) 11:46, 30 January 2011 (UTC)

Merger proposal[edit]

I propose that Cidomo be merged into Horse-drawn vehicle. I think that the content in the Cidomo article can easily be explained in the context of Horse-drawn vehicle, as Cidomo is a type of horse-drawn vehicle. The Horse-drawn vehicle article is of a reasonable size in which the merging of Cidomo will not cause any problems as far as article size or undue weight is concerned - d3j4vu (talk) 06:52, 30 January 2011 (UTC)

If the Cidomo article was going to remain as a stub, then I'd agree. However, looking at the Indonesian wiki, there is a good bit more material to come. The vehicle is also quite unusual in several respects (not least the shaft arrangement). I think it would be best left as a stub for the moment. Richard New Forest (talk) 11:46, 30 January 2011 (UTC)
Bad idea; a cidomo is a culturally significant form of a horse-drawn vehicle and warrants it's own article. Cheers, Jack Merridew 22:15, 18 February 2011 (UTC)

Design norms and recommendations[edit]

The article lacks any reference to design norms and /or recommendations for design of carts and roads, used in present day or obsolete.

Maybe it should be looking on old military manuals. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 206.132.109.103 (talk) 15:50, 6 October 2016 (UTC)