Talk:Hot-dip galvanization

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Add a link to our website[edit]

How to control the thickness of the galvanize layers, when passing through the liquid zinc. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Wsimondd (talkcontribs) 18:46, August 23, 2007 (UTC).

See my comment on the main "galvanize" page. In addition to information on hot-dip galvanizing, the American Galvanizers Association's website also has information about other zinc coatings, such as electroplating, sheet metal, metallizing, etc. Also, on google searches of "hot-dip galvanizing," "galvanizing," and "galvanized steel," the AGA will appear within the top 5 sites. 71.218.208.72 21:18, 19 July 2007 (UTC)Melissa Lindsley, Marketing Manager, American Galvanizers Association

Painting Requirement for Hot Dipped Galvanized Pipe[edit]

Is painting required for the galvanized pipe —Preceding unsigned comment added by 202.163.80.251 (talk) 11:57, 18 October 2007 (UTC)

would hot dip galvanizing bend and distort steel?? i.e gates an such like?? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 212.32.73.40 (talk) 19:42, 20 October 2008 (UTC)

Corrosion is the tendency for metal to revert to its lower and more natural energy state, after production and shaping. In order for corrosion to occur, four elements must exist or be present at one time - anode, cathode, electrolyte and its return current path. Main causes of corrosion include: water, dirt, salt and other contaminants that can provide an electrical path which can vastly accelerate corrosion. 70% of the Earth’s surface is covered in water. Therefore a majority of countries around the world suffer the ill effects of corrosion caused by moisture. The situation is compounded in countries bounded by the Oceans of the world. Not only is the problem of corrosion hazardous, but it can also cause damage to natural resources - if the longest product life is not possible, the result could be early project failures, requiring unnecessary consumption of resources. Corrosion can take place anywhere and at anytime - affecting everything from water pipes to steel sidewalk sections, and it is thus vital to extend the life and durability of steel in an attempt to minimize the problem. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 103.247.48.138 (talk) 17:36, 19 February 2015 (UTC)