Talk:Human tooth sharpening

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title[edit]

I think it should be human tooth sharpening, since the noun is being used as an adjective, and adjectives generally use the singular form for modification. e.g. "lip gloss", not *lips gloss. -- Soap Talk/Contributions 03:42, 21 July 2009 (UTC)

 Done Lәo(βǃʘʘɱ) 21:45, 21 July 2009 (UTC)

Health issues[edit]

Shouldn't this practice expose the dentin beneath the enamel and be therefore really bad for your teeth? Are there any recorded health issues from people who did this? --Mudd1 (talk) 01:02, 19 March 2014 (UTC)

The practice itself is painful and depending on how much is filed away, the pain tends to persist even if the teeth are healthy. It also causes hypersensitivity to temperature and pressure and the changed bite pattern can hurt the jaw joint or cause other jaw discomfort. Of course, the teeth don't stay healthy. I've seen a picture of chiselled Viking teeth and even though the Viking in question was probably still young when he died of his injuries one could see the start of tooth decay in the grooves. I should probably note though that the Vikings tended to have severe tooth wear, especially on the front teeth and the first molars, so maybe the downsides of having fashionably filed teeth were of no concern to them, given what they had to contend with anyway.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26930771
More than half (58.9%) ... reported the tooth filing as painful and nearly two-thirds (64.3%) ... reported having persistent pain afterwards. ... A total of 42.9%, 12.5% and 7.1% of the participants had Smith and Knight TWI[1] scores of 2, 3 and 4 respectively.
So yes, you're right. Also, this article isn't comprehensive enough, as it doesn't mention Viking or Japanese practices and it should probably be renamed because I don't think there's enough material to split off things like Mayan practices such as sculpting the teeth and embedding Jade ornaments in the teeth into a separate article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.114.146.117 (talk) 21:09, 13 November 2017 (UTC)