Talk:IBM System/370

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Did S/370 use Advanced Solid Logic Technology for CPU circuits[edit]

? - Rod57 (talk) 11:29, 9 January 2016 (UTC)

When did the dual address space stuff show up?[edit]

The "1980s" section says:

In October 1981, the 3033 and 3081 processors added "extended real addressing", which allowed 26-bit addressing for physical storage (but still imposed a 24-bit limit for any individual address space). This capability appeared later on other systems, such as the 4381 and 3090.

Apparently, the dual address space stuff showed up in 1981 as well; did it show up at the same time as, and in the same machines as, the "extended real addressing" facility?

If so, perhaps it should be mentioned in that paragraph; if not, perhaps it should be mentioned in an item before the 370-XA item, rather than having the "The cross-memory services capability which facilitated movement of data between address spaces was actually available just prior to S/370-XA architecture on the 3031, 3032 and 3033 processors." comment in the section on 370-XA. Guy Harris (talk) 02:58, 8 April 2016 (UTC)

DAS came in with the 3031, 3032 and 3033, before the 3081. MVS/System Product Version 1 Release 3 was the first version of MVS to support DAS and extended real addressing. S/370-XA was never available on the 303x processors, only on 3081 and later. MVS/SP V1 could run on a S/370 mode 3081, 3083 or half of a 3084, but to use all four engines of a 3084 on a single system image you needed MVS/SP V2 (MVS/XA). Shmuel (Seymour J.) Metz Username:Chatul (talk) 20:04, 8 April 2016 (UTC)
So IBM says the 303x came out in 1977; was DAS available, in the hardware, then, or was it added later (e.g. in a microcode update)? If it was available in the hardware, was it not supported by the OS until later? (The article says that "extended real addressing" was added in 1981; was that a microcode (or hardware) update, or was it always there since 1977 but not supported by the OS until 1981?) Guy Harris (talk) 20:48, 8 April 2016 (UTC)

Table Notable[edit]

This is a suggestion that the 40 or so words beginning "Notable machines in the 370 range include..." be "tabled."

A friend once noted that the American meaning is to take off the table (of discussion) whereas the British meaning is to put on the table, to be discussed.

This is meant to cover both: If there are no convincingly opposing statements, it is hereby recommended that "Notable" be deleted; the notability information has been added to the specific model texts. Pi314m (talk) 08:26, 26 December 2016 (UTC)

The text being removed says:
Note also the confusing term "System/370-compatible", which appeared in IBM source documents to describe certain products. Outside IBM, this term would more often describe systems from Amdahl Corporation, Hitachi Ltd., and others, that could run the same S/370 software. This choice of terminology by IBM may have been a deliberate attempt to ignore the existence of those plug compatible manufacturers (PCMs), because they competed aggressively against IBM hardware dominance.
Some OR/Original Research: Dr. Google's awards are- the 165 is top mention overall, the 135 is top mention on the IBM site, and the 125 seems to be top mention on Wiki (all languages). Pi314m (talk) 01:27, 23 January 2017 (UTC)
CORRECTION.. the above text stays; the text being removed says:
Notable machines in the 370 range include the IBM 370/195, the IBM 370/168, the IBM 3033, the IBM 3090 mainframe/supercomputer with its optional vector facility (VF) extension, and the relatively inexpensive IBM 9370 tailored for small-to-medium size businesses. Pi314m (talk) 01:35, 23 January 2017 (UTC)