Talk:Inna Lillahi wa inna ilayhi raji'un

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Hadith in the lead[edit]

The relationship between the Hadith (the last paragraph of this version) and the verse (the subject of this article) is not clear. Does this verse appear in the original Arabaic Hadith? Or, does the verse immediately follow it? So far as I am understanding, the verse is from Quran, while this story is not. So what is their relationship? Why the story needs to be there? --Dwaipayan (talk) 06:01, 27 August 2013 (UTC)

It is actually a misunderstanding on your part. It is a hadith, and not a story. A hadith is not a story, rather a saying of Prophet Muhammad (SW). The relationship is that the hadith contains the verse, but not as a verse but as a prayer (dua) because the verse Inna...raji'un is used as a prayer. In Muslim tradition, it has several benefits and the hadith is pointing one such benefit. That's why it is there.--AsceticRosé 14:19, 6 September 2013 (UTC)
But the very first sentence of the lead says "Inna lillahi wa inna ilayhi raji'un is a verse of the Quran ". So is it verse from both Quran and Hadith (I think the two are separate things, right?)? If so, that needs to be written. And the paragraph on the Hadith starts off with "Abu Musa al-Ashari reported that Muhammad said, "When a son of a servant of Allah dies" It is totally sudden. No one knows who is Abu Musa, and this is lacking the context. You have to say that so and so (who is he) Abu Musa reported in a Hadith... and so on.--Dwaipayan (talk) 18:13, 6 September 2013 (UTC)
The problem is arising as you are not familiar with the writing-style of Islamic articles, but it is all okay. A verse can be only from Quran. A Hadith is called Hadith. When it is written that someone reported something from Prophet Muhammad, it is understood by everyone that this person is a companion of the Prophet, and the reported thing is a hadith. So it is avoided as a redundancy. You can still write this for clarification, but not necessary. As such, this is not sudden (as it is the normal style of writing any hadith) nor is it out of context.-AsceticRosé 04:34, 7 September 2013 (UTC)
Ok, somewhat understood. A great majority of readers who are not familiar with Islamic articles would face similar problem. So, I went ahead and made some changes in that paragraph. Please have a look. Regards.--Dwaipayan (talk) 00:47, 8 September 2013 (UTC)
Yes, your edit is nice. I've made minor copy-edit to make it more easy. Thanks. -AsceticRosé 15:49, 8 September 2013 (UTC)