Talk:Internal combustion engine

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Graph Colours[edit]

Hi,

could the colours on the graph at the bottom of the page be changed? it's rather hard to distinguish the lines.

Fuel systems?[edit]

Seems to me this article is missing any discussion of carburettors, turbochargers, superchargers, fuel injection and so forth. There's no fuel going into our ICs! WolfKeeper

question about compression ratios[edit]

I have a question:

When you press on the accelerator pedal of a petrol engine, you open the throttle and allow more fuel/air mixture to enter each cylinder. Therefor the harder the acclerator is pushed, the more volume enters the cylinder; and thus the compression is increased, yes?

The average compression ratio of a petrol engine is about 10, but is that at full throttle. Is the compression much less when the engine is idling?


On the other hand a diesel engine is only controlled by how much fuel is injected , so the compression ratio is always about 20.


However it gets much more confusing when a turbo is added =(

The compression ratio remains the same no matter what the throttle setting is but the compression pressure varies with throttle settings . Usually on petrol engines with 10 to 1 compression ratio the open full throttle cranking start speed (1000RPM) is about 150 to 220 PSI but at part throttle it could be as low as 40 PSI. malbeare 20/5/2007

Swashplate Engine?[edit]

No mention of the swashplate configuration is listed in the current article (31 July 2007). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swashplate_engine Swashplate Engine

Sentence fragment in introduction[edit]

Hello, I am not a regular contributor to wikipedia, so forgive any buffoonish errors I make in the following.

In revision 413119031, user Twexcom removed the clause "the ICE delivers an excellent power-to-weight ratio with few disadvantages" from the sentence "Powered by an energy-dense fuel (which is very frequently petrol, a liquid derived from fossil fuels), the ICE delivers an excellent power-to-weight ratio with few disadvantages."

It seems clear that this was an attempt to remove the potentially controversial claim that internal combustion engines have "few disadvantages," but what remains is the fragment "Powered by an energy dense fuel."

I considered simply adding "...the ICE delivers an excellent power-to-weight ratio," but given that this error has persisted for nearly two years, and that even this reduced version of the sentence contains the value-laden word "excellent," I decided to post to the talk page and let the wiki natives decide how to proceed.

Thanks for all y'all do.

Internal Combustion Steam Engine[edit]

I posted a public disclosure to the named invention of mine in sci.military.naval. Here is another public disclosure.

Douglas Eagleson 217 East Deer Park DR Gaithersburg,MD 20877 301-977-0832

Invention: Internal Combustion Steam engine.


A mixture of water and alcohol at a level will cause exothermic oxidation while in a super critical water oxidation reaction chamber. Both water and alcohol oxidize inside a water volume such as a tube or chamber volume system. A flame literally stabilizes inside a cavity bubble in a water mass. A 50% alcohol and 50% water mixture is exothermic and will cause steam. Combustion is internal therefor. Flames in liquid stabilize in the supercritical temperature and pressure levels of water.

This invention eliminates oxidizers as input gases. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.231.227.217 (talk) 20:12, 10 May 2015 (UTC)

Internal Combustion Steam Engine[edit]

I posted a public disclosure to the named invention of mine in sci.military.naval. Here is another public disclosure.

Douglas Eagleson 217 East Deer Park DR Gaithersburg,MD 20877 301-977-0832

Invention: Internal Combustion Steam engine.


A mixture of water and alcohol at a level will cause exothermic oxidation while in a super critical water oxidation reaction chamber. Both water and alcohol oxidize inside a water volume such as a tube or chamber volume system. A flame literally stabilizes inside a cavity bubble in a water mass. A 50% alcohol and 50% water mixture is exothermic and will cause steam. Combustion is internal therefor. Flames in liquid stabilize in the supercritical temperature and pressure levels of water.

This invention eliminates oxidizers as input gases. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 96.231.227.217 (talk) 20:14, 10 May 2015 (UTC)

Gas turbines[edit]

The text says, 'Notably, the combustion takes place at constant pressure, rather than with the Otto cycle, constant volume." But the piston engine does not operate with constant volume (moving piston changes the size of the combustion space) and the gas turbine does not operate at constant pressure (the compressor raises the pressure and the burning fuel further increases the pressure). Perhaps an expert can reword this so that it does not appear to be contradictory. CPES (talk) 17:53, 8 June 2015 (UTC)

In the Otto cycle, combustion is assumed to be so rapid (compared to physical piston movement) that it takes place as a sudden rise in pressure at constant volume.
In the Brayton cycle gas turbine, the pressure at each location is considered constant. In effect the cycle takes place spread out over the axial dimension, rather than spread out over time as in the piston cycles. Andy Dingley (talk) 23:27, 8 June 2015 (UTC)