Talk:Introduction to Metaphysics (Heidegger)

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Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. Editors desiring to contest the closing decision should consider a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: Move. I will also convert Introduction to Metaphysics to a disambiguation page per the discussion; as always if one article is identified as the primary topic it can be moved to the base name. Cúchullain t/c 12:50, 9 May 2014 (UTC)



An Introduction to Metaphysics (Heidegger)Introduction to Metaphysics (Heidegger) – This is the correct English title of the book; see this link --Relisted. Armbrust The Homunculus 21:36, 1 May 2014 (UTC) 81.83.137.205 (talk) 20:33, 24 April 2014 (UTC)

(edit conflict)While technically Bergson's eponymous work is an essay, I'm not completely convinced as to whether having "book" and "essay" as disambiguators doesn't introduce the perhaps not categorically impossible that is within the realm of Kantian categories that they might not be fully efficacious in their intended function, especially when considering the not entirely dissimilar fields of endeavour of those two authors, won't you say? walk victor falk talk 17:14, 2 May 2014 (UTC)
"Introduction to metaphysics", per WP:TWODABS, should point to either of them whichever can be considered the wp:primarytopic; wp:hatnotes are sufficient for disambig. Heiddeger gets a clear advantage in numbers, though it's not a terribly large difference. I know that technically we should award a dab-less title to one of them, but in this case I think it is highly recommendable to keep both "(Heidegger)" and "(Bergson)". walk victor falk talk 18:14, 2 May 2014 (UTC)
Strike that, "Introduction to metaphysics" should be a dab page, per goethean. walk victor falk talk 18:25, 2 May 2014 (UTC)
  • Comment I have a copy of Heidegger's An Introduction to Metaphysics right in front of me as I type this. What on Earth does it mean to say that Introduction to Metaphysics is the correct title? FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 20:33, 2 May 2014 (UTC)

The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page or in a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

Where does the "indelibly fascist" quote come from!?

Τα μετά τα φυσικά[edit]

How is metaphysics understood by the lecture . For it is noted that "The title of the course is thus deliberately ambiguous "(21). How is the fundamental question derived to its singular priority.... Διοτιμα (talk) 03:35, 7 December 2017 (UTC)

Julian Young[edit]

Looks like an interesting writer of some merit, but it's not a name one encounters much in bibliographies concerning Heidegger. I don't doubt the quote from him is accurate and reasonable, but he's really not the "go-to" guy one would want. Moreover the "Nazi character" of the book isn't widely seen (so far as I know) as its primary or most significant aspect.

Badiacrushed (talk) 22:11, 23 December 2017 (UTC)

It is relevant cited material. Do you have a source contradicting it and stating that Introduction to Metaphysics is not widely regarded as fascist in character? If so, we can mention both views to balance things out. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 22:19, 23 December 2017 (UTC)

"Fascist in character"[edit]

Certainly this work is famed for its "inner truth and greatness" quote. The article's lead says the book is "widely regarded as fascist in character" or something like that.

Perhaps this assertion is true, but there's no citation. Young's quote pertains to his personal view, rather than a perceived consensus. Certainly the assertion has been made regarding Heidegger's work as a whole, and it's been quite "widely" entertained. But not to say "accepted" or "widely regarded" as such. It's a controversy.

Irrelevant example: Aspects of the Bible are humorous in character." This is arguably a true statement. Whole books, in fact have been published on this. "The Bible is humorous in character." This would probably be "widely regarded" as a misleading and basically false statement. But I have no sources. Some, no doubt, regard the Bible as a joke.

SO really, considered from a reader's (myself) point of view, this article is a failure. I've spent more than a year reading various works by and about Heidegger. IM might go on my reading list. I came here hoping for information that would be helpful in a decision.

Yes, of course we all know about H's Nazi dealings and his generally reactionary world view.

But no, simply dismissing IM as "basically fascist" doesn't offer, in itself, worthy insight for readers. Badiacrushed (talk) 18:29, 26 December 2017 (UTC)

You write, "Perhaps this assertion is true, but there's no citation." You are incorrect. The material is cited, to Young. Because the citation is present in the main body of the article, it does not have to be repeated in the lead. Please review MOS:LEADCITE and WP:WHENNOTCITE. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 21:03, 26 December 2017 (UTC)

Young's quote pertains to his personal view, rather than a perceived consensus.

Young's personal view is at page 110. As he notes,“the critics of Heidegger's philosophical works of the early thirties, both friendly and hostile, I shall suggest , are all wrong”. As he further notes, “none of these, I shall argue, amount to totalitarianism [and] do not constitute fascism”.

Young's view is here irrelevant. The claim was that there is a widely shared view that the character (and not content ) of the book can be regarded as fascistic. This does not question the views veracity but mentions its existence .

The acknowledgement of the existence of such views is qualitatively different form simply dismissing IM as "basically fascist". This in turn would be a worthy insight for readers ; it informs, contextualizes and shapes their reading : for once, it reflects at what Heidegger himself called Grundstimmung of the work.

Placed in context the quote is an implication of Heidegger’s 1930s corpus . It is a reflection of the view held by Wolin, Herrbamas (who is mentioned in the translator’s introduction to Im) and Sheehan to name a few. Διοτιμα (talk) 07:06, 29 December 2017 (UTC)

I am sorry, but in all honesty your comment is incoherent. I understand the meaning of the individual words, but your assertions are so vague and there are so many illogical jumps from one claim to another that the meaning of the whole is not apparent. If you are trying to make an argument, I cannot see what it is. Could you please explain more clearly what you are trying to say? For the benefit of anyone reading this, Young's comment is actually sourced to page 8 of the book, not page 110. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 09:34, 29 December 2017 (UTC)

Yah not sure about above chatter, but I definitely made a mistake about Young's comment. Point is nonetheless, he's a comparatively obscure analyst. Not necessarily a bad one, but obscure.

The 2001 book "A Companion to Heidegger's Introduction to Metaphysics," published by Yale University, has 13 chapters and 13 authors (not Young), only four of which seem to concern politics. I don't believe the fairly long introduction characterize IM as "fascist." Of course this proves nothing -- yet it may point away from idea that there's is a consensus about the book's "fascist character." I don't know, but am skeptical. Badiacrushed (talk) 20:43, 30 December 2017 (UTC)

Your comments are pointless. You have no evidence Young is "comparatively obscure" and it would be of no relevance if he was. His book, published by a reputable academic publisher, qualifies as a reliable source per Wikipedia's policies. See WP:RS. That is the only relevant issue. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 21:46, 30 December 2017 (UTC)

Well, indeed, perhaps you're right. In that this is a "talk page," it's reasonable for me to merely point out the fact of Young's relative obscurity among Heidegger analysts. I say this on the basis of looking at a half-dozen bibliographies in which Young's works aren't prominent. It's unimportant that you're unaware of this, or deem it irrelevant.

Of course, I'm sure Young's work is of valid interest, and have not questioned Young as a "reliable source" as normally defined at Wikipedia. If you feel that's the "only relevant issue," then you may be ill-equipped to address the larger question -- or perhaps you're right. I simply don't know.

Problem is, the lede says, or implies, that IM (along with B&T) sums up H's views, and that these are of a "fascist" character. I'm unconvinced that as a matter of consensus among analysts, that this is a reasonable summation, despite the use of a "reliable source." Badiacrushed (talk) 00:49, 31 December 2017 (UTC)

No. You have misunderstood what the lead actually states. It states that a specific book by Heidegger is "widely regarded as fascist in character" - not even that it is actually fascist, but just that it is widely seen that way. There is no implication that Heidegger's philosophical views in general are fascist, or that there is any consensus to that effect. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 01:29, 31 December 2017 (UTC)

True, but unfortunately the only character to which the lede refers is "fascist." One could enumerate an infinite number of things that the lede DOESN'T say. Obviously no point in that.

The lede really only says two things: that H. believed IM and B&T summarize his views on ontology (the only topic H dealt with), and that IM is "widely regarded" as fascist in character. That's all.

"Widely regarded" suggests to the ordinary reader, consensus, unless I'm mistaken.

A word search for the term "fascist" of the Stanford EP entry on Heidegger turns up nothing. Same for IE of P. Interestingly, the Stanford article DOES cite J. Young (though many other analysts are more heavily cited).

I'd have thought that if H's ontology were seen by consensus as "fascist in character," then this view, or at least the term, would turn up in those sources.

But I am quite uncertain about this. Badiacrushed (talk) 02:02, 31 December 2017 (UTC)


A preference to stay closely as possible to the original source helps to prevent any "hermeneutical chicanery”. Compared to the original source, one can easily see that the "inner truth and greatness" phrase is nothing but tendentious cherry picking and decontextualisation of the text.

1.For starters it is a "in medias res" quotation: quoting only the middle part of the sentence to present the idea that it is the introductory portion. It omits (or better yet is an outright censorship and distortion of) the introductory part that notes " In particular,what is peddled about nowadays as the philosophy of National Socialism, but which has not the least to do with" and presents only the peacock term the "inner truth and greatness". This creates the illusion that it is an outright claim about NSDAP and not a philosophical polemical against the notion of values as such.

2.The tail end of the quote ("is fishing in these troubled waters of "values" and "totalities") is, in an utterly unacceptable outright act of censorship and distortion also not included. This in turn not only "buries the lede" but also deliberately decontextualises the quote to seem as an outright praise of Nazism rather than a polemical discussion of the notion of values and totalities that encompasses a critique of nazism as an example.

3.It ignores the problematic nature of the infixed scholia( "namely, the encounter between global technology and modern humanity") that is a sure discredit that the quote is a praise of nazism rather than an allusion to Heidegger's analysis of modern technology.

4. The phrase as it stands cannot be used to draw the conclusion that has been widely regarded as fascist in character; for it does so at the great and deep expense of obfuscation and misinformation.

5. Fascism (just as all isms) itself is a rather broadly multifaceted and an overdetermined phrase to bare any semantic relevance on itself ( a perfect example being Orwell's essay what is fascism?).One has to point specific parts of the text that reflect specific parts of a clearly defined notion of fascism and not a vague "inner truth" catchphrase. This would be done properly in the reception part and not in the introduction. But still,one has to justify why only the middle half of "inner truth and greatness" quote is picked over the other 44 words that argue contrary to the conclusion derived from it . — Preceding unsigned comment added by Διοτιμα (talkcontribs) 23:58, 28 February 2018 (UTC)

Heidegger's reference to the "inner truth and greatness" of National Socialism is mentioned because it is a notorious aspect of the book. As such, it is appropriate to mention it in a summary such as the lead. Per WP:LEAD, the lead must "summarize the most important points, including any prominent controversies". Of course the material about Nazism can be further expanded upon in the main body of the article, to better explain it and provide more context. I have no objection to that and would encourage it. Your complaint that I am guilty of "censorship and distortion" is both insulting and laughable. I have, of course, not "censored" any material from you providing more context to explain the quotation because you never even tried to add any. Your complaint about the material is badly argued. No, quoting only part of the sentence does not "present the idea that it is the introductory portion". No, the concept of "peacock" (a reference to WP:PEACOCK?) is not relevant here. No, quoting only part of the sentence does not create "the illusion that it is an outright claim about NSDAP and not a philosophical polemical against the notion of values as such". Your comment, "Fascism (just as all isms) itself is a rather broadly multifaceted and an overdetermined phrase to bare any semantic relevance on itself" is gibberish. Beside that, Heidegger's comment is of course among other things praise of National Socialism - if you refer to the "inner truth and greatness" of something, that's praise. Deal with it. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 00:31, 1 March 2018 (UTC)



Yes; if you refer to the "inner truth and greatness" of something, that's praise - But only and only if the surrounding context argues to this effect. Can you show that? Is the surrounding context in line with your praise claim?

To make it easy, can you provide further context to the phrase that would not only provide the fascist connections that you claim to exist but also offer specific praises of nazism that are given than sticking to the decontextualised "inner truth and greatness" phrase? The point to be made is that it is misleading to use the phrase as it is presented since it hides not only the context but derives a problematic conclusion that is not supported by the full contents of the sentence.What in specific seems praiseworthy about nazism in the quote that speaks of a "peddled philosophy of National Socialism, that has not the least to do with the inner truth and greatness of this movement ?!!

The quote distinguishes between the "peddled philosophy of National Socialism and an alluded other philosophy of National Socialism(that is not talked about in the quote). Which "nazism" are you referring to when you claim that "Heidegger's comment is of course among other things praise of National Socialism". For it is obvious the peddled one is not being praised for " fishing in these troubled waters of "values" and "totalities" " - let alone not being able in " the least to do with the inner truth and greatness of this movement" .Your claim would have to carefully, not only distinguish the two philosophies but also be qualified to reflect that the praise is not leveled at nazism as it is but to the alluded one. But this is in no way a praise of nazism. What is praised is nazism as conceptualised in Heidegger's head which is already not the nazism of crude race biologism ( which is what was intended).

Your inner truth phrase is terribly misleading for it only presents few catchphrases while ignoring and thus censoring the rest of the quote that shows what heidegger is praising as Nazism is an eccentric conception of it that is at variance with general nazism and is rather a critique of it that led him to dig up trenches in 1944 in the upper Rhine. Praytell, Which nazism is Heidegger praising?Διοτιμα (talk) 03:31, 1 March 2018 (UTC)

Do you see anyone agreeing with your views? Do you think it is at all likely that anyone is going to agree with them? If not, you should ask yourself whether commenting here serves any purpose. Talk pages exist to discuss how to improve articles - they are not for general discussion or chit-chat, and if you imagine that I am interested in debating Heidegger with you, you are sorely mistaken. My interest in that is non-existent, and if I somehow wrongly gave you the impression that I am interested, I regret it. You are apparently confused about what my views are, or do not really care, but I will not correct you except to point out that I never claimed the existence of any "fascist connections" between anything and anything else. That is your language, not mine. It is not a good use of your time or mine to ask me to defend or explain views that I do not hold. You still seem to think that I am somehow "censoring" things. I am, once again, doing nothing of the kind, as anyone can see. "Censorship" could be happening only if I were removing material explaining the Heidegger quotation about Nazism in more detail. You never even tried to add such material. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 07:53, 1 March 2018 (UTC)


Do you see anyone agreeing with your views? Do you think it is at all likely that anyone is going to agree with them? Answer: Yes!!!?

Christian lewalter seconded by Heidegger himself (See the introduction to EM at xvi) 

Julian young (whom you use to as a source does) at page 110 of the quoted book. Hans Sluga's essay in " A Companion to Heidegger's Introduction to Metaphysics" at page 208. He interprets the sentence in question as a four pronged polemical aimed at differing groups. As noted in the prior argument, the quotation was "a philosophical polemical against the notion of values as such." Sluga notes that " Heidegger must have wanted to underscore his attack on the theory of values . . . [in 1935 and also in1953] when he [let the quote stand in the text] in order to renew his critique of the philosophy of value and the political appeal to it. For the theory of value was once again in vogue in Germany in 1953" The four pronged polemical claim of Sluga is in line with the distinction of the two philosophies noted above.

As he notes that the sentence made four polemical claims (and not parises)

1. National Socialism has an inner truth and greatness

2. That this must be distinguished from its outer and possibly flawed manifestation.

3. That the speaker himself possesses a unique insight into the inner truth of the movement (this is what is praised)

4. National socialism cannot be grounded in a theory of value and organic unity (page 208)

This is a pure philosophical polemic rather than praises. Were it a praise it would be of what Heidegger conceived to be nazism and not what was nazism in 1935. The polemics, Sluga notes were aimed at

1. Opponents of national socialism

2. Petty , bureaucratic party penpushers

3.Party ideologues

4.Value philosophers

if you imagine that I am interested in debating Heidegger with you, you are sorely mistaken. My interest is to discuss how to improve the article by showing that Your inner truth phrase is terribly misleading; for it only presents few catchphrases while ignoring the broader context in which it lays, thus, allowing you to draw a problematic conclusion that is contradicted by the larger context. This is not a general discussion or chit-chat, but pointing out that a specific phrase and the conclusion it draws in the article is at variance with the larger context from which it was plucked. your language, not mine, claims that "Heidegger's comment is of course among other things praise of National Socialism" . It  claims that as a matter of course a fascist character can be proved from the quote.  Again, in your language, not mine, can you provide further context to the phrase that would not only provide the fascist connections that you claim to exist but also offer specific praises of nazism that are given than sticking to the decontextualised "inner truth and greatness" phrase?This, presumably  is a good enough use of your time or mine; to ask you to defend or explain Which "nazism" are you referring to when you claim that "Heidegger's comment is of course among other things praise of National Socialism". 

Btw Censorship is not limited to removal, it includes tendentious omission and inclusion (which is what the phrase would be if it did not give satisfactory reasons as to why they are done) 10:18, 1 March 2018 (UTC)Διοτιμα (talk)

In response to the question, "Do you see anyone agreeing with your views?", the answer is indeed yes, Διοτιμα, as witness this revert of your disruptive editing by Drmies. You are continuing to try to force through controversial changes - such as the removal of all mention of Heidegger's reference to the "inner truth and greatness" of National Socialism - through edit warring, despite opposition from multiple editors. That won't stand, and neither will your tendentious misrepresentation of sources. You altered a sentence stating that Introduction to Metaphysics "been widely regarded as fascist in character" to "The work is regarded by some as fascist in character". "Some" is a euphemism and a form of weasel words. See WP:WEASEL. The source used is Julian Young's book Heidegger, philosophy, Nazism, which states on page 8 that Introduction to Metaphysics is a work which "even those on the whole sympathetic to Heidegger have generally taken to be indelibly fascist in character." Young is obviously suggesting that there is a general view that the Introduction to Metaphysics is a fascist work. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 00:26, 2 March 2018 (UTC)
As for your comment that the "inner truth phrase is terribly misleading; for it only presents few catchphrases while ignoring the broader context in which it lays, thus, allowing you to draw a problematic conclusion that is contradicted by the larger context" - I would repeat that 1) You are perfectly free to add material explaining that "broader context" and that I would welcome this, and 2) I am not trying to draw any "conclusion" about anything at all, and you are simply confused in suggesting otherwise. Despite your claim to the contrary, it appears as though you are trying to have an argument about the proper interpretation of Heidegger's work, and that is in no way appropriate to a talk page. Though I am not sure, it appears that you are assuming that the sentence "The work, in which Heidegger refers to the "inner truth and greatness" of National Socialism, has been widely regarded as fascist in character" is somehow arguing that the work is "fascist" because of its reference to the inner truth and greatness of National Socialism. If that is your assumption, it is quite wrong. The sentence in question is not an attempt to make an argument or to deduce anything. Without wanting to be too offensive, or inflame matters further, I suggest that you might want to consider how poorly you are communicating and how strange your comments look. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 02:39, 2 March 2018 (UTC)
  • I am having a really hard time following Διοτιμα's line of reasoning, but it doesn't really matter--they are trying to argue something complex about their reading of Heidegger, but we don't do readings of Heidegger here: we do what secondary sources allow us to do. What Διοτιμα can do is add material that is based on secondary sources (not on their interpretation of Heidegger), and they certainly cannot remove well-sourced material. Drmies (talk) 05:55, 2 March 2018 (UTC)


Claim: The sentence in question is not an attempt to make an argument or to deduce anything.

Answer: What is it then?

If the sentence is not somehow arguing that the work is "fascist" because of its reference to the inner truth and greatness of National Socialism, then there would be no problem taking the phrase out .

If that is your assumption, then it would have the same semantic value if amended to read thus : The work, in which Heidegger refers to "being and becoming", has been widely regarded as fascist in character" Or better yet, it can be emended to read "The work has been widely regarded as fascist in character" without losing any of its meaning and intention.

A problem arises only when the fascist character is predicted on the inner truth phrase .

There is no denial that some people do not consider, while some do consider the book to be fascist in character. All that has been pointed is that the phrase "inner truth" as is decontextualised an tendentiously placed cannot be used to ground that consideration. If it is not grounding it then there would be no problem plucking it out.

Claim: it appears as though you are trying to have an argument about the proper interpretation of Heidegger's work.

Answer: All that has been done ( just like with the reference to the preface to Being and time and other edits ) is point out the simple fact that the matter as quoted is at variance with the original text. You don't have to interpret anything ; but do a simple comparison with the text to make such foolish accusations about tendentious misrepresentation of sources. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Διοτιμα (talkcontribs) 05:59, 2 March 2018 (UTC)

The sentence "The work, in which Heidegger refers to the "inner truth and greatness" of National Socialism, has been widely regarded as fascist in character" is not an argument but a factual statement, based on two sources. The two sources cited are Introduction to Metaphysics itself and the book Heidegger, philosophy, Nazism by Julian Young. The fact that the sentence is not an argument is not a reason for removing it. That the sentence could be differently written is also not, in principle, a reason for removing it. The point of the sentence is to explain some of the notorious aspects of the book, and I believe it does that reasonably well. If you think the sentence about Nazism requires more context to properly explain it then you could add that context, as you have been invited to do several times now. Incidentally, although I disagree with your removal of the sentence here, I believe that some other parts of your edit were helpful and improved the article and are better than your earlier efforts. Thank you. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 06:53, 2 March 2018 (UTC)


The same criterion offered above still stands.

If the sentence is a fact, then it makes two factual claims:

1.The work refers to the "inner truth and greatness" of National Socialism.

2. The work has been widely regarded by some as fascist in character.

Fact 1(since its the inner truth phrase) can be proved by EM or Julian's: which ultimately depends on EM (for it claims in Em there is such a phrase) . Fact 2 ( which is nothing but the claim that there exist a group of people who consider EM thus) can only be proved by Julian's and not EM which does not even mention the word fascist. Julian, to prove fact 2 will have to name the people who deem EM thus. They in turn will have to allude to specific parts of EM that they deem fascist in character.

The two are unrelated facts. Fact one can be proved by just looking at the text where it says "inner truth". fact 2 is argumentative and depends on pointing to specific points in EM to ground its conclusion that the text is fascist (since this pointed to aspects are fascist) This means that the above criteria applies here too.

If the two are not dependent factually: with fact 1 being the ground to fact 2, then they would maintain their factual veracity when separated.

As an argument, A problem arises only when the fascist character is predicted on the inner truth phrase

As a Fact, A problem arises only when the fascist fact appeals to the inner truth fact as its factual ground.

Supposing one were to make a demand on the fascist claim to offer specific examples in EM? my point was that the inner truth sentence or phrase would not be one of them since it would contradict its claim ( as secondary source quotations and not my own interpretation from Hans, lewalter and Julian have shown above). The point to be made is not a denial of the existence of the fascist perception but the amalgamation of the two claims that are from varying sources and contradictory in their meaning and intention as though they are related in context, intention, and semantics.

Btw the sentence does explain some of the notorious aspects of the book and reasonably well at that. By your own admission, the sentence is factual. all it does is say the work is regarded as fascist in character; and that the work refers to the "inner truth and greatness" of National Socialism. It does not explain anything or how this two facts might be related (if they are at all) and in what sense.Διοτιμα (talk) 08:22, 2 March 2018 (UTC)

That is an example of what I mean by expressing yourself poorly. The talk page is really not a place for lengthy arguments of that kind, and most people are not likely to bother to even try to follow such a comment. It would be unrealistic to look for a detailed response. Of course if you have any specific proposal to make to improve the article (say the addition of material to further clarify the meaning of Heidegger's reference to National Socialism) then other editors will listen. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 08:45, 2 March 2018 (UTC)

Regardless of how poorly expressed or prolixed the comments are ; they are in good sooth. Its intention is to bring to attention that the two quotations from varying sources cannot be amalgamated either in a factual or argumentative manner since they are at variance with each other. How can you understand any specific proposal is you cant understand what the specific problem is. The same fascist claim is presented in the reception part of the article in a non problematic fashion. It is only in its introductory amalgamative form that it is problematic; since the two sources that are used are at variance. If, as you have claimed, that they are not dependent in a factual or argumentative manner (then how are they dependent) then separate themΔιοτιμα (talk) 09:55, 2 March 2018 (UTC)

Your latest edits make some clearly unacceptable changes. You have now made part of the article read, " This opens up the discussion of socio-political entanglements of Dasein and his eccentric notion of the "inner truth and greatness" of National Socialism. These discussions have led the work to be widely regarded as fascist in character". Those changes may have been made in good faith. They also violate basic Wikipedia policies such as WP:NPOV and WP:NOR. You may believe that adding the term "eccentric" before "National Socialism" gives a helpful explanation of Heidegger's views, but it does not. It is not likely in the least that readers will know what it is intended to mean, and it is also blatant editorializing of a kind that has no place in a Wikipedia article. I also have to point out that the sentence "These discussions have led the work to be widely regarded as fascist in character" does not belong in the "Overview" section, which is a summary of the book's contents. It is a statement about how the book has been understood by commentators, and it belongs in the lead. Per WP:LEAD, the lead should "identify the topic, establish context, explain why the topic is notable, and summarize the most important points, including any prominent controversies". That obviously includes the fact that the book has been regarded as fascist. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 21:45, 4 March 2018 (UTC)

Inner Greatness[edit]

Certainly the book is most infamous for this quote. But I doubt the quote is seen as offering the work's most valuable or significant insight. This gets to the "fascist in character" bit. The lead seems to dismiss the work with this comment. It's doubtful that a three-word summary of Heidegger would shed much light on the work. ```` — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2602:304:CFA3:D560:288B:5E6:D98D:F8C8 (talk) 00:48, 27 March 2018 (UTC)

Here's another poorly done bit: "As an introduction to metaphysics, Introduction to Metaphysics is a guide into metaphysics and the totality of its fundamental questions."

Why does the first clause of the above sentence exist? Moreover, I'd say the book is entirely idiosyncratic and concerns Heidegger's views, rather than generally guiding the reader "into metaphysics" as a broadly established field of inquiry.

So. that bit seems like a "fail." 76.250.61.86 (talk) 18:43, 31 March 2018 (UTC)

Being and Time[edit]

I reverted this edit by Διοτιμα, but after consulting Being and Time I have reconsidered and restored many of the changes made. Note, however, that it was misleading to add that Heidegger commended Introduction to Metaphysics as an "elucidation to the question of being" - the text is not a direct quotation from Being and Time. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 22:17, 24 February 2018 (UTC)

I am afraid I have had to revert this edit by Διοτιμα also. Simply put, filling the article full of quotations from Heidegger is not a way to write a good article and does not help its readers. Rather, the article needs to summarize material and make proper use of secondary sources. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 20:09, 25 February 2018 (UTC)

I have made an ANI post about the disruptive editing by Διοτιμα, including the removal of all mention of Heidegger's praise for Nazism from the lead of the article. This is outright censorship and distortion and is intolerable. Per WP:LEAD, the lead must "summarize the most important points, including any prominent controversies" - in this case, that obviously includes controversies related to Heidegger's pro-Nazi comments. FreeKnowledgeCreator (talk) 10:13, 28 February 2018 (UTC)