Talk:Iowa-class battleship

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Former featured article Iowa-class battleship is a former featured article. Please see the links under Article milestones below for its original nomination page (for older articles, check the nomination archive) and why it was removed.
Good article Iowa-class battleship has been listed as one of the History good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it.
Featured topic star Iowa-class battleship is the main article in the Iowa class battleships series, a featured topic. This is identified as among the best series of articles produced by the Wikipedia community. If you can update or improve it, please do so.
Main Page trophy This article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on December 31, 2005.
Frequently asked questions (FAQ)

Question about the refit in the eighties[edit]

Hello! There is a sentence in Iowa_class_battleship#1980s_refit saying that the ships were refitted to burn navy distillate fuel. If there was a need for a refit to make them use this fuel, what did they use before? I cannot imaging that any conventionally powered steamship consuming fuel oil burns something else than heavy fuel oil / Bunker C (with the exception of IJN warships at the close of WW II using something like [light] crude oil). A clarification would be nice. Regards, Grand-Duc (talk) 20:28, 23 August 2011 (UTC)

I have been told by men in the U.S. Navy that for decades, all of the conventional ships of the Navy have burned a fuel that is identical in all regards to JP - 4 or JP - 5 jet fuel. This includes all such ships that are propelled by steam turbines. Of course, this was extremely convenient in the conventionally-powered aircraft carriers, such as the USS Kitty Hawk, Constellation, America, and John F. Kennedy, in which the ships, their jet planes, and their helicopters (propelled by gas turbines) all burned the same kind of fuel. All conventional ships that have helicopters burn jet fuel in all engines. All ships powered by gas turbines (such as the Spruance class, the Ticonderoga class, the Arleigh Burke class, and the Oliver Hazard Perry class) burn jet fuel, and these all carry helicopters that burn jet fuel, too. All ships of amphibious warfare that carry helicopters and/or AV - 8B Harriers just need that one kind of fuel, no matter if they use steam turbines or gas turbines for propulsion. All of the replenishment ships burn the same kind of fuel that they carry as cargo.
For a long time, the Navy hasn't had any "Black gangs" that burned black fuel oil in the ship's boilers.
You can look up the details on all of this elsewhere if you choose to do so.98.81.2.31 (talk) 03:05, 2 June 2012 (UTC)
All of the Navy's nuclear-powered aircraft carriers need to be re-supplied by tankers that carry just one kind of fuel. Their jet aircraft burn JP - 4 or JP - 5 (You can look up the details.) All of their helicopters (such as Seahawks) are powered by gas turbines that burn the same stuff. Their E-3Cs and C-2s have turboprop engines that burn the same stuff. Those big carriers also have tanks of fuel for their escorting cruisers, destroyers, and frigates when those run low on fuel (before the tankers can arrive). It doesn't matter too much, but all of these warships in the present Navy are powered by gas turbines that run quite happily on JP - 4 or JP - 5. Nowadays, the only warships in the navy that are conventionally-powered and also use steam turbines are amphibious warfare ships, such as the Wasp-class and the USS Pelileu. All of this has been true ever since the USS Kitty Hawk and the USS John F. Kennedy have been retired from service -- and those burned JP - 4 or JP - 5 anyway. Until such time as the USS Zumwalt enters service, ALL of the destroyers of the Navy are from the Arleigh Burke class. All of the cruisers are Ticonderoga class, and all of the frigates are Oliver Hazard Perry class. All but one of the aircraft carriers is of the Nimitz class -- with the USS Enterprise being the only exception. There are only two classes of attack submarines - the one whose main job is to hunt enemy submarines.98.81.2.31 (talk) 03:24, 2 June 2012 (UTC)
No to everything above. With the shift away from heavy fuel oil / Bunker C - vastly reduced soot and maintenance requirements for the boiler. The shift was to Distillate fuel marine (DFM). This is pretty close to diesel fuel in composition - DFM can be used in a diesel engine. Using JP-4 or JP-5 in a diesel engine is acceptable for a limited usage - burn hotter, helps clean out any issues. In the Middle East when a batch of HL-4 or JP-5 would fail the specification test - it was frequently sold as DFM, accepting the slightly lower sale price. When using heavy fuel oil / Bunker C fuel must be preheated, and light-off of the plant was done with a different fuel (such as DFM or JP-4. I thing the steam powered ships from the 1960s were built lacking the preheaters needed for black oil. I expect all of the US Gas Turbine ships (FFG-7, CG47, DDG) have a separate system for JP-5 for helicopters. I remember in the Eadly 1980s have a port call at Rota Spain- and as taking on fuel noticed the residue of heavy fuel oil / Bunker C from the prior refuelling and having to ensure we were about to recieve DFM Wfoj3 (talk) 00:12, 31 August 2015 (UTC)

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Featured Article review[edit]

The following was removed from the article for lack of reliable sourcing, but can be restored if a reliable source can be found for the information:

  • Steam was normally transmitted to four engine rooms numbered 1 to 4. Each engine room was aft of its associated fire room. In normal steaming four boilers were operated; this was sufficient to power the ships at speeds up to 27 knots (50 km/h; 31 mph).[citation needed] For higher speeds, all eight boilers were lit.
  • Electricity drove many systems aboard ship, including rotating the turrets and elevating the guns. Each of the four engine rooms had a pair of Ship's Service Turbine Generators (SSTGs)[1] manufactured by Westinghouse. Each SSTG generated 1.25 MW for a total of 10 MW of electricity. The SSTGs were powered by steam from the same boilers that fed the engines. To allow battle-damaged electrical circuits to be repaired or bypassed, the lower decks of the ship had a Casualty Power System whose large three-wire cables and wall outlets (called "biscuits") could be used to re-route power.[2][citation needed]

External links modified[edit]

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  1. ^ For a diagram and statistics of SSTGs, see: Hochscheidt, Mike. "Ship's Service Turbine Generator". Retrieved 16 December 2010.  [dead link]
  2. ^ Defense Technical Information Center. "Casualty power (DOC)". United States Department of Defense. Retrieved 16 December 2010.  [dead link]