Talk:Iris (mythology)

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Mixing Greek and Roman names[edit]

" Like Hermes (also known as Mercury), Iris carries..." Mercury was the later Roman name, and does not seem to appear contemporarily to Iris (at least by that name), and is not relevent to the topic. Also, the article does not include similar references for other Greek names. I.e., Zeus is not appended "(also known as Jupiter)", etc. I am removing the parenthetic reference in this case. If someone believes it should be included, I recommend including similar references throughout, instead of a simple reversion. 69.161.95.222 (talk) 17:44, 13 March 2010 (UTC)

Confusing sentence in last section[edit]

"The manifestation of the "Iris" shares many characteristics to Lao Tzu's ("pragmatic") theories of perception in his book, the Tao Te Ching." What does this mean??Lily20 (talk) 17:03, 15 October 2009 (UTC)

I've removed the following:

* The manifestation of the "Iris" shares many characteristics to Lao Tzu's ("pragmatic") theories of perception in his book, the Tao Te Ching.

  • Irisianium is being goddess like and graceful towards others.

The first sentence may or may not make a valid but abstruse argument - I've read the Tao Te Ching and certainly it is not an obvious point. (Even if it is a valid point, is it about the goddess or about the rainbow or the flower...?) What that tells me is that this needs a source or else it doesn't help the reader anyway.

The second is referenced in a few places in the Web but they all seem to flow from here. Again ... even if true, how much use is this if there's no way to follow up on it? "goddess like" and "graceful" just admit too many potential interpretations.

In the same revision I also telescoped three video game bits into one sentence - I'm just not convinced that a video game character with a pretty special effect has very much to tell us about how the goddess is perceived in art and literature. Wnt (talk) 10:28, 15 November 2009 (UTC)

Mistake within article[edit]

In the beginning of the "In myths" section, the author states, "Iris never married and is one of the three virgin gods." However, at the end of this section, the author states, "Iris is married to Zephyrus, who is the god of the west wind. Their son is Pothos (Nonnus, Dionysiaca). Clearly these two statements contradict one another. I briefly researched, and found that by some accounts, she was a virgin goddess, and by others, she was married and had a child. Furthermore, I have not found Iris mentioned in any articles about virgin goddesses. I am not sure how to edit this, but maybe just add "In some versions . . ." to the first statement.

Mistake within article[edit]

In the beginning of the "In myths" section, the author states, "Iris never married and is one of the three virgin gods." However, at the end of this section, the author states, "Iris is married to Zephyrus, who is the god of the west wind. Their son is Pothos (Nonnus, Dionysiaca). Clearly these two statements contradict one another. I briefly researched, and found that by some accounts, she was a virgin goddess, and by others, she was married and had a child. Furthermore, I have not found Iris mentioned in any articles about virgin goddesses. I am not sure how to edit this, but maybe just add "In some versions . . ." to the first statement. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 165.82.70.53 (talk) 17:29, 4 April 2012 (UTC)

Iris[edit]

The use of the title "Iris" is under discussion, see Talk:Iris (plant) where the plant is proposed to be the primary topic. -- 70.24.248.246 (talk) 21:31, 28 December 2012 (UTC)