Talk:Jizamurai

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Is the redlinked ikki in this article and Ikko-ikki the same thing? -- 63.226.38.196 02:53, 6 July 2006 (UTC)

Very similar, but not quite the same. Ikki can mean mob or crowd, and refers to the groups who took part in particular peasant uprisings of the 16th and 17th centuries... Not all of these uprisings were led by members of the Ikko sect... LordAmeth 11:29, 23 July 2006 (UTC)
日本語と英語で失礼します。一揆とは、ほぼ同じ階層に属する者たちの連帯・同盟関係を指し、中世後期(14世紀頃)から本格的かつ急速に日本社会の各層に広まっていきました。このうち、15 - 16世紀に現れた一向宗信者たちの連帯が一向一揆です。16世紀以降の百姓一揆もその本質は百姓階層の連帯だったのであり、ある局面では抵抗組織の形態をとることもあったに過ぎません。
Ikki means unification of same class people. Ikki has spread to the each level of Japanese society in later Middle age (about 14th century). Ikko-ikki was one of many ikkis. Ikko-ikki was organized by followers of Ikko-shu (one kind of Buddhism). The essence of the peasant ikki after the 16th century was to have united the peasant class, and the form of the resistance organization was taken in a certain phase occasionally.
--Shimoxx 17:06, 17 August 2006 (UTC)

別の話題になりますけれども、本項目Ji-samuraiで「地侍は、国人とも呼ばれる(also known as kokujin)」とありますが、これは誤りです。両者の境界は必ずしも明瞭ではありませんが、日本史学では国人地侍は別個の歴史概念とされています。本項目には地侍だけについて記述し、新たにkokujinの項目を立てるべきと思います。自分は日本語ならいざ知らず英語ではとても執筆できませんので、ここに問題を提示しておきます。--Shimoxx 17:06, 17 August 2006 (UTC)

"Ji-samurai, also known as kokujin" is wrong. Kokujin and ji-samurai are distinct historical concepts. There should be an article Kokujin, besides Ji-samurai. --Shimoxx 17:06, 17 August 2006 (UTC)

Also, the standard way to render this term into English is "jizamurai." I have never heard this pronounced "Ji-samurai". —Preceding unsigned comment added by Nick Kapur (talkcontribs) 06:25, 16 December 2008 (UTC)

  • I moved the page to 'jizamurai' because it is an obvious misspelling, as Nick Kapur suggests. さえぼー (talk) 11:28, 18 October 2015 (UTC)
Following the above discussion, I deleted the section about 'kokujin', because kokujin and jizamurai mean different people. My edit, however, is reverted twice. さえぼー (talk) 06:46, 31 October 2015 (UTC)
  • References removed, and the explanation about kokujin is added, not following the discussion in this talk page. I reverted the edits about kokujin. --saebou (talk) 13:47, 22 May 2017 (UTC)