Talk:Jin (Korean state)

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About the choice of word ...[edit]

Isn't it more exact to use 'the Japanese illicit accupation' rather than 'Japanese rule' ...? For It is the fact that the emperor Gojong did not accepted the forced incorporation. Of courese, there is no sign of the ruler of Choseon dynasty. Jtm71 21:57, 18 July 2006 (UTC)

No although there are some faults and lies commited by Great Japanese Empire, it is true that Gwang Mu Emperor sent Minister Li Wan yong to agree the incorporation. --햄방이 (talk) 06:54, 26 April 2015 (UTC)

Jin Confederacy did not controll modern DPRK.[edit]

Jin confederacy only controlled South Korean four provinces. Those are called Gyeonggi Province and Chungcheong Province and Jeolla Province and Gyeongsang Province. Hwanghae Province was controlled by Chaoxian(Joseon - Gojoseon) who did not speak Proto-Korean language. And Gangwon Province was controlled by nomadic mountainous Ye tribes who did not spoke Proto-Korean.--햄방이 (talk) 06:59, 26 April 2015 (UTC)