Talk:Julius Caesar

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Former featured article Julius Caesar is a former featured article. Please see the links under Article milestones below for its original nomination page (for older articles, check the nomination archive) and why it was removed.
Main Page trophy This article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on February 24, 2004.
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Family Tree[edit]

The family diagram does not contain Caesarion.


External links modified[edit]

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External links modified[edit]

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Gigantic IVLIVS CAESAR in the infobox[edit]

What purpose does this serve? It's not done in any other Roman bio articles that I've seen, and it doesn't add anything. -165.234.252.11 (talk) 19:54, 2 January 2018 (UTC)

Agreed, removed. Ivar the Boneful (talk) 19:05, 10 January 2018 (UTC)

where and how insert this text:Christianization of the pagan cult of Julius Caesar[edit]

Caesarius of Terracina is the saint chosen for his name to replace and Christianize the pagan figure of Julius Caesar; Then there is the Julian, associated with Saint Caesarius, in Italy, whose church at the Imperial palace on the Palatine in Rome, recorded from the seventh century, shows that the name was interpreted in terms of the imperial title that originated with Julius Caesar[1].

Caesarius of Terracina also achieved prominence because a church, the imperial chapel, was named after him by Valentinian III, an example of a saint with a suitable name being chosen as a patron. Caesarius was the obvious patron for the chapel of the Caesars[2].

  1. ^ The Mankind quarterly, volume 39, Cliveden Press, 1998
  2. ^ Michael Perham, The communion of saints, Published for the Alcuin Club by S.P.C.K., 1980