Talk:Korean War

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Former good article nominee Korean War was a good articles nominee, but did not meet the good article criteria at the time. There are suggestions below for improving the article. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
Article milestones
Date Process Result
August 9, 2007 WikiProject peer review Reviewed
September 11, 2007 Good article nominee Not listed
Current status: Former good article nominee


Semi-protected edit request on 24 March 2016[edit]

This line is confusing and out of place: "On 23 September, the 65th Infantry Regiment from the 3rd Infantry Division arrived at Pusan. The enemy made many attempts to encircle that regiment, but each time they failed because of the many casualties inflicted by the 65th. Because the 65th held their positions, this enabled the U.S. Marines to withdraw from the Chosin Reservoir.{{citation needed|date=February 2016}"

Chosin Reservoir and the US Marine withdraw did not happen till December of 1950. The 65th Regiment did not support any withdraw of Marines from Pusan. This is likely a mash up of two concepts inserted by someone with a specific agenda to note this regiment. The 65th did not participate in major combat operations in the Pusan Perimeter, and was not involved in supporting the Marine withdraw until several months later.


Djmc993150 (talk) 00:20, 24 March 2016 (UTC)

Red question icon with gradient background.svg Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format.  B E C K Y S A Y L E 06:10, 25 March 2016 (UTC)
I've removed this. It is clearly out of place. It's also confusing. The Chosin Reservoir is at the opposite end of the country from Pusan.--Jack Upland (talk) 05:09, 11 July 2016 (UTC)

Content copied from source[edit]

Some of this content seems to have been directly lifted from this URL: http://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/how-korean-war-almost-went-nuclear-180955324/?no-ist — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2601:19A:8101:87D5:B4F4:70:45:9743 (talk) 03:41, 24 April 2016 (UTC)

Korea peace[edit]

The war is not easy to forget . Anyway , there is huge sacrifice for the countries involved . That is the reason negotiation for peace become so hard ....... Icedawan (talk) 04:24, 11 July 2016 (UTC)

Why is it that there is never any mention of the battles the 1st Marines engaged in on the MLR and the outposts we defended time after time, loosing so many Marines. To me it seems as though the infintry soldier and the Korean War has been forgotten.I was on Mainline of resistence,and spent weeks on outposts receiving heavy artillary,mortar,and small arms fire until the cease fire in July 1953, the 27th to be exact. We were sure thanked for service, it never gets mentioned. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2600:8800:FF01:A00:5C32:5926:C325:F52C (talk) 06:37, 25 July 2016 (UTC)

Why is it that there is never any mention of the battles the 1st Marines engaged in on the MLR and the outposts we defended time after time, loosing so many Marines. To me it seems as though the infintry soldier and the Korean War has been forgotten.I was on Mainline of resistence,and spent weeks on outposts receiving heavy artillary,mortar,and small arms fire until the cease fire in July 1953, the 27th to be exact. We were sure thanked for service, it never gets mentioned.

Sgt. William W. Freck USMC C-1-1-1 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2600:8800:FF01:A00:5C32:5926:C325:F52C (talk) 06:45, 25 July 2016 (UTC)

You are more than welcome to write a page or pages on this topic provided it is written based on WP:RS and other Wikipedia policies, otherwise it will have to wait until an interested author decides to write on this topic. regards Mztourist (talk) 08:44, 25 July 2016 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 30 July 2016[edit]

Source 10 link is broken, I recommend replacing it and checking other sources that link to the USFK Public Affairs office


121.222.16.211 (talk) 01:22, 30 July 2016 (UTC)

Done — Andy W. (talk ·ctb) 01:31, 30 July 2016 (UTC)

Korea divided[edit]

I've reversed a couple of edits and I want to explain why.

  • The People's Republic of Korea was suspected of Communist sympathies. We shouldn't say it was Communist. Lyuh Woon-hyung was not a Communist.
  • The Soviet authorities and the Communists refused to participate in the election on the grounds that it wouldn't be fair. This means it was only held in the South. In addition, South Korean politicians, such as Kim Ku, boycotted it. I think this was because they didn't want to have an election in the South only, because they thought rightly that this would make the division permanent.--Jack Upland (talk) 21:36, 1 August 2016 (UTC)
Judging by the policies outlined on the PRK article, it seemed pretty communist to me. How would you describe those policies? Why do you capitalise 'communist' but not other political descriptions? Alfie Gandon (talk) 00:20, 2 August 2016 (UTC)
"Communist" should not be capitalized MOS:DOCTCAPS. – Finnusertop (talkcontribs) 00:26, 2 August 2016 (UTC)
A republican is different from a Republican, and a democrat is different from a Democrat. I capitalised "Communist" because I was referring to the international Communist movement initiated by Marx and Lenin. The word "communism" refers to a system of common ownership. China today is not communist, but it is run by the Communist Party. Peter Kropotkin was a communist, but not a Communist. In this case, we have to distinguish between the Communists, who eventually coalesced into the Workers Party of Korea, and other leftists. Clearly, the PRK had a strong left-wing orientation, but at the same time it nominated Syngman Rhee as president. Lyuh was a socialist, not a Communist (in the sense that he was not an adherent to the Communist movement, unlike Kim Il Sung for example). Lyuh was trying to create a broad coalition of Korean political groups, including the Communists. Describing the PRK as "Communist" or "communist" would be misleading. By the way, I think all the articles on this period need work.--Jack Upland (talk) 05:32, 2 August 2016 (UTC)
Insofar as "communism" refers to a form of ownership, those whose political motivations include promoting that form of ownership are "communists", with lowercase c, per MOS:DOCTCAPS. Exceptions are limited to proper names (Communist Party of China). If you want to emphasize the distinction between Marxist, Leninist, Marxist-Leninist and other kinds of communists, you will have to find another way. Altering capitalization makes no sense from either stylistic or other considerations. While that distinction exists (see Non-Marxist communism), I don't think it's terribly important to underline in this article, which is a general exposition of Korean War, not a discussion of the genealogy of communism. Though you are right in saying that simply labeling the Provisional government "communist" does no justice either. Whatever we do, let's follow the characterizations of our best sources (and our MOS). – Finnusertop (talkcontribs) 06:15, 2 August 2016 (UTC)
I think that according to the MOS it should be capitalised, but there's no point arguing about that here. We don't have a source to say why the US authorities suppressed the PRK - here or on any other page that I can see. In fact, there is a bit of a contradiction, because it says that the PRK was suspected of Communist sympathies, but it also says that the PRK was suppressed because of riots against the trusteeship. The Communists supported the trusteeship. (By the way, the People's Republic of Korea is different from the Provisional Government.)--Jack Upland (talk) 10:38, 2 August 2016 (UTC)
How would you describe the PRK's policies? Alfie Gandon (talk) 18:12, 2 August 2016 (UTC)
I think I already answered that question, but it's not for us to put our opinions in the article.--Jack Upland (talk) 23:03, 2 August 2016 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 4 August 2016[edit]

Source 376 is broken and source 377 cites GDP purchasing power power parity rather than GDP per capita PPP as stated. South Korea ranks 48 according to CIA World Factbook in GDP per capita PPP (North Korea ranks 210). — Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.20.46.141 (talk) 06:26, 5 August 2016 (UTC)