Talk:Kosovo/Sources

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Sources on Kosovo's status[edit]

Encyclopedias[edit]

Encyclopedia Britannica

Kosovo, region within the republic of Serbia, Serbia and Montenegro (formerly Yugoslavia, 1929–2003), occupying the southwestern portion of the republic... [1]

Britannica Student

The province of Kosovo is part of Serbia and Montenegro (formerly Yugoslavia), a country in the Balkan region of Southeastern Europe.

Britannica Junior

The province of Kosovo lies within the republic of Serbia, in eastern Europe.

The Oxford Dictionary of English

Kosovo, an autonomous province of Serbia ...

The Oxford Dictionary of Phrase and Fable

An autonomous province of Serbia bordering on Albania ...

Concise Dictionary of World Place-Names

A geographic, and predominantly Albanian-populated, region under Serbian sovereignty—but, in effect, a European-run colony or protectorate under UN administration since mid-1999 ...

World Encyclopedia

Autonomous province in s Serbia ...

The Macmillan Encyclopedia

An autonomous province of S Serbia, in the Union of Serbia and Montenegro.

The Crystal Reference Encyclopedia

Province of S Serbia...

The Columbia Encyclopedia

Albanian Kosova, Serbo-Croatian Kosovo i Metohija and Kosmet ... S Serbia and Montenegro, in Serbia.

The Hutchinson Encyclopedia

Autonomous region 1945-1990 of southern Serbia ...

Encarta

Kosovo, province in southwestern Serbia ... [2]

Governments and international organisations[edit]

Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Kosovo remains nominally a province of Serbia, but has been a UN protectorate since June 1999 under UN Security Council Resolution 1244. [3]

Council of Europe

Kosovo is part of the territory of Serbia and Montenegro, a member state of the Council of Europe. As a result of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1244 (1999), however, for over five years Kosovo has been administered by the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) and its security guaranteed by KFOR. [4]

French Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Profile of Serbia is being rewritten following Montenegro's independence, but includes a map of Serbia with Kosovo shown as a part of Serbia: Le Kosovo est sous administration provisoire de la M.I.N.U.K (Mission des Nations Unies au Kosovo) [5]

United Kingdom Foreign Office

Kosovo is legally a province of Serbia and Montenegro (SaM) but has been under interim UN administration pending a settlement of its status in accordance with UN Security Council Resolution 1244 since 1999. [6]

United Kingdom Ministry of Defence (Permanent Joint Headquarters)

Kosovo is legally a province of Serbia and Montenegro (SaM) but has been under interim UN administration pending a settlement of its status in accordance with UN Security Council Resolution 1244 since 1999. [7]

United States Central Intelligence Agency

The final status of the Serbian province of Kosovo remains unresolved and several thousand peacekeepers from the UN Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) have administered the region since 1999, with Kosovar Albanians overwhelmingly supporting and Serbian officials opposing Kosovo independence. [8]

United States Department of State

While legally still part of Serbia, Kosovo remains an international protectorate of the United Nations as outlined in UN Security Council Resolution 1244 (passed June 10, 1999). Under UNSCR 1244, UNMIK assumes the supreme legal authority in Kosovo, while working to create "substantial autonomy and self-governance" in Kosovo and, eventually, facilitate a political process to determine Kosovo's future status. [9]

United Nations[edit]

United Nations High Commission for Refugees

... the Kosovo province of the State Union of Serbia and Montenegro ... [10]

United Nations Mission in Kosovo

Kosovo, an Albanian-majority Serbian province, has been run by the UN since Western forces drove out Yugoslav troops in 1999 amid ethnic fighting. [11]

United Nations Mission in Kosovo map

An UNMIK map of Kosovo and part of Serbia. [12]

UN Security Council, 5373rd Meeting, 14/02/2006

When the Security Council met this morning to consider the situation in Kosovo (Serbia and Montenegro), it had before it a report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK), dated 25 January and covering the Mission's activities, as well as developments in Kosovo, Serbia and Montenegro, from 23 May to 31 December 2005. [13]

Report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo, 23 May 2005

It covers the activities of UNMIK and developments in Kosovo, Serbia and Montenegro ... [14]

MILUTINOVIC ET AL. (IT-05-87) Case Information Sheet, 9 August 2006

Kosovo is located in the southern part of the Republic of Serbia, and was part of the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (SFRY). [15]

UN News Centre, 15 August 2006

New head of UN Kosovo mission optimistic about a status settlement ... The UN has run Kosovo, an Albanian-majority Serbian province, since international forces drove out Yugoslav troops in 1999 amid ethnic fighting. Independence and autonomy are among options that have been mentioned for its final status. [16]

Media sources[edit]

BBC

Kosovo, a landlocked province within Serbia, has been the backdrop to a centuries-old and often-strained relationship between its Serb and ethnic Albanian inhabitants. The province is administered by the UN, having endured a conflict in the late 1990s which was fuelled by ethnic division and repression. Sovereignty rests with Belgrade. Reconciliation between the majority ethnic Albanians, most of whom seek independence, and the Serb minority remains elusive. [17]

CNN

Kosovo is a province of Serbia, but it has been an international protectorate since 1999. [18]

Fox News

Serbia's southern, ethnic Albanian-dominated province of Kosovo ... [19]


National Geographic: National Geographic Atlas of the World, Eighth Edition, 2004.

The Serbian province of Kosovo (known as Kosova to Albanians) continues to be administered by the United Nations as an international protectorate ... [20]