Talk:Krypton

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All the elements appear to have had their electron configurations swapped.[edit]

I noticed while trying to check my work for a chemistry assignment that all the elements seemed to show the wrong information in a google search which led me to check Wikipedia's entries on the matter. I am in a bit of a time crunch between classes, so I am just going to leave a note here for now pointing this out. I figure it is either because of a bot, some master table, or possible vandalism. Examples include Iodine showing Krypton's configuration while Krypton shows Argon's. I haven't explored further, but the clues leave me in little doubt that this is through all the elements. Nick F. S. 207.233.102.21 (talk) 16:57, 10 September 2014 (UTC)

Belay my last. It appears that this is known as "Shorthand Notation". Maybe it would be appropriate to list both the long form and the shorthand indicating it as such for those who are just being introduced to chemistry. This caused a lot of confusion for myself but this is largely because my own college has made chemistry a hybrid course that requires the students to largely teach themselves from a college developed book that doesn't actually cover a lot of things. It seems to take for granted that you know certain things already and just goes from there. I'll come back later with a better developed idea, but I think some way of indicating on the elements that the electron configuration is written in shorthand would be useful. Nick F. S. 207.233.102.21 (talk) 17:10, 10 September 2014 (UTC)
Agree, it's not very helpful if you don't know what the shorthand means already. Perhaps a note or even some text is required, referring the reader to noble gas#noble gas notation. How about using the {{abbr}} template, so that if you hover over [Ne] you will see mouseover text saying "1s2 2s2 2p6", which is what "[Ne]" is short for? Double sharp (talk) 03:04, 11 September 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 25 September 2014: let's try that again![edit]

The section on the use of Krypton in the definition of the meter jumps back and forth in the chronology, making it confusing. It also gives an inaccurate rounded reciprocal of the formal definition, and and it's simply wrong in its claim about a 1927 redefinition of the metre; in 1927 the CGPS adopted the IAU's cadmium-based spectroscopic definition of the angstrom. This was a separate unit from the metre (although chosen to be very close to 10−10 m), as technology at the time limited the accuracy with which wavelengths and macroscopic objects could be compared. The current text is:

In 1960, an international agreement defined the meter in terms of wavelength of light emitted by the krypton-86 isotope (wavelength of 605.78 nanometers). This agreement replaced the longstanding standard meter located in Paris, which was a metal bar made of a platinum-iridium alloy (the bar was originally estimated to be one ten-millionth of a quadrant of the Earth's polar circumference), and was itself replaced by a definition based on the speed of light—a fundamental physical constant. However, in 1927, the International Conference on Weights and Measures had redefined the meter in terms of a red cadmium spectral line (1 m = 1,553,164.13 wavelengths).[1] In October 1983, the same bureau defined the meter as the distance that light travels in a vacuum during 1/299,792,458 s.[2][3][4]

I'd like to replace that paragraph with:

In 1960, the International Conference on Weights and Measures defined the meter as 1,650,763.73 wavelengths of light emitted by the krypton-86 isotope.[5][6] This agreement replaced the 1889 international prototype meter located in Paris, which was a metal bar made of a platinum-iridium alloy (one of a series of standard meter bars, originally constructed to be one ten-millionth of a quadrant of the Earth's polar circumference). This also obsoleted the 1927 definition of the ångström based on the red cadmium spectral line,[7] replacing it with 1 Å = 10−10 m. The krypton-86 definition lasted until the October 1983 conference, which redefined the meter as the distance that light travels in a vacuum during 1/299,792,458 s.[8][9][10]

The 1927 conference also technically redefined the metre by clarifying the measurement conditions for the international prototype metre, but that seems like too much detail. One open issue is whether to refer to the 1927 or 1907 definition of the angstrom; it was defined by the IAU in 1907, and adopted by the CGPM in 1927, so either date is reasonable. 71.41.210.146 (talk) 00:58, 25 September 2014 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ Burdun, G. D. (1958). "On the new determination of the meter" (PDF). Measurement Techniques. 1 (3): 259–264. doi:10.1007/BF00974680. 
  2. ^ Shri Krishna Kimothi (2002). The uncertainty of measurements: physical and chemical metrology: impact and analysis. American Society for Qualit. p. 122. ISBN 0-87389-535-5. 
  3. ^ Gibbs, Philip (1997). "How is the speed of light measured?". Department of Mathematics, University of California. Retrieved 2007-03-19. 
  4. ^ Unit of length (meter), NIST
  5. ^ "The BIPM and the evolution of the definition of the metre". Bureau International des Poids et Mesures. 2014-07-26. Retrieved 2014-09-24. 
  6. ^ Penzes, William B. (2009-01-08). "Time Line for the Definition of the Meter". National Institute of Stadnards and Technology. Retrieved 2014-09-24. 
  7. ^ Burdun, G. D. (1958). "On the new determination of the meter" (PDF). Measurement Techniques. 1 (3): 259–264. doi:10.1007/BF00974680. (subscription required (help)). 
  8. ^ Shri Krishna Kimothi (2002). The uncertainty of measurements: physical and chemical metrology: impact and analysis. American Society for Quality. p. 122. ISBN 0-87389-535-5. 
  9. ^ Gibbs, Philip (1997). "How is the speed of light measured?". Department of Mathematics, University of California. Retrieved 2007-03-19. 
  10. ^ Unit of length (meter), NIST
Yes check.svg Done. Note that this isn't an endorsement of this particular version, I've simply implemented it because there has been no objections here. Stickee (talk) 00:23, 26 September 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 4 March 2016[edit]

Suggestion: New entry in the Chemistry section [at the very end]

"Recently, Zaleski-Ejgierd et al. predicted that a whole new class of krypton compounds - krypton oxides - should stabilize thermodynamically at elevated pressures. In particular, krypton monoxide (KrO) should form spontanously from mixture of pure elements at approximatelly 285 GPa (2.85 million atmospheres). In it krypton atoms are expected to form strong covalent bonds with the oxygen atoms [1].

[1] P. Zaleski-​Ejgierd and P. M. Łata, “Kryp­ton oxides under pres­sure”, Sci­en­tific Reports 6, 18938 (2016) [1]

Teopze (talk) 11:59, 4 March 2016 (UTC)

Red information icon with gradient background.svg Not done: please establish a consensus for this alteration before using the {{edit semi-protected}} template.  B E C K Y S A Y L E 05:47, 15 March 2016 (UTC)
Nevertheless, I think this is a worthy addition, so I will add it. Double sharp (talk) 06:50, 5 August 2016 (UTC)
 Done Double sharp (talk) 06:53, 5 August 2016 (UTC)

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