Talk:Kujargé language

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Untitled[edit]

This article has been misnamed. The Kajakse language [ISO 639-3, ckq] is NOT the same language as the Kujarge language [ISO 639-3, vkj]. This article currently seems to combine information from both languages in a jumble. It's late tonight, so I'll straighten it out in the morning. There is another page (correctly) labelled Kajakse language for the Chadic language ISO 639-3 ckq. I will remove any information relevant to that language from this article and place it there. The remaining information will be left here and the ISO number, etc. changed to reflect the unclassified language "Kujarge". It's clear that Bender treats these as separate languages, as well as Ethnologue and Blench's unpublished (but web-available) Chadic Gazeteer. (Taivo (talk) 19:51, 16 March 2008 (UTC))

Well, I just noted that the main source for both articles was ultimately the same (Bender 1983), both were considered Chadic. Anyways, I've restored the original version, so the info. from the two articles has been again seperated. Thanks for correcting me.--Aldux (talk) 22:16, 16 March 2008 (UTC)

Isolate versus Unclassified[edit]

Yes, Kwami, this is better "unclassified" than "isolate". My main concern was that it wasn't labeled "Afro-Asiatic". --Taivo (talk) 15:12, 30 September 2010 (UTC)


I came across these papers while researching Meroitic...I hope they can help with the Kujarge/ Kujarke article. According to these papers, as of 2012, Kujarke/ Kujarge has been tentatively classified as East Chadic by Lovestrand et al. 2012 [1] and Malaskova and Blazek et al. 2012 [2]

Lovestrand says:

“Though geographically isolated from other Chadic languages, Kujarge has been described as a Chadic language since its earliest :documentation (Doornbosand Bender 1983:59, 76). The people are described as “Chadic speakers” who may have very well been taken as :slaves from the western boundary of the Daju sultanate, viz., the Guéra region. An unpublished list of two hundred Kujarge words from :the field notes of Paul Doornbos has recently been circulated among linguists. While there are some words on thelist that point to :links with other Afroasiatic families, Kujarge shares more lexical similarities with East Chadic than any other group (Blench 2008, :Blažek 2010). It is suggested that these cross-family similarities may be retention of archaic forms and more evidence of the links :between Afroasiatic families.
The limited data available renders any attempt at classification of Kujarge tentative at best. Nonetheless, the lexical comparison in :this study supports what other linguists have proposed: Kujarge is most likely a member of the Chadic languages of the Guéra. The :percentage of similar words between Kujarge and B1 languages averages at about 25 percent. The percentage of similarity with B3 :languages averages at about 14 percent. This supports the suspected connection between Kujarge and B1 (Dangla-Mubi group), suggested by :Paul Newman (Blažek 2011). Based on this data, it is proposed that a new subgroup be created for Kujarge in the B1 group: B1.3. This :subgroup allows the classification to reflect that Kujarge is an East Chadic language most closely associated with the B1 group, but :not particularly closely related to either of the B1 subgroups. The full list of likely Kujarge-East Chadic B cognates is given in :Appendix 2.”

There is a useful image in the Lovestrand et al. 2012 paper on page 22. Malaskova and Blazek et al. 2012 ascribes a minority of words in their wordlist to the Nilo-Saharan Fur language or it's immediate relatives.

They say:

“…With respect to a minorit[y] share of Nilo-Saharan parallels in comparison with the dominant share of East Chadic parallels which apparently do not reflect any recent loans, it is possible to conclude the solution (i) is most promising. Kujarke probably represents an independent group of East Chadic branch, perhaps with a closer relation, genetic or areal, to the Dangla-Mubi super-group (the same conclusion was formulated by Lovestrand 2012). Remarkable, although sporadic, links to Omotic, Cushitic or Berber, confirm an archaic character of the Chadic stratum of the Kujarke lexicon. In regard of the position of the easternmost Chadic language it is not so surprising (cf. Blench 2008). From the neighboring non-Chadic languages the strongest influence may be ascribed to Fur or better to some of its relatives, because the Fur-like words in Kujarke are rather different from their Fur counterparts.” A.Tamar Chabadi (talk) 09:43, 2 April 2013 (UTC)
Thank you for those links. It seems that Kujarge is probably to be classified as Chadic, possibly East Chadic B.1.3. --Taivo (talk) 21:03, 4 June 2013 (UTC)