Talk:La Crosse encephalitis

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Is it an arbovirus or a bunyavirus? The article seems to say both. RJFJR (talk) 13:44, 22 June 2013 (UTC)

Both. "Arbovirus" (ARthropod BOrne VIRUS) is an epidemiologic class, and is a rather informal designation of viruses carried by insects, ticks, or (theoretically) other arthropods. "Bunyavirus" is the actual taxonomic class of the virus, based on its structure and biochemistry. Many arboviruses are taxonomically unrelated to others. 208.196.65.106 (talk) 19:20, 16 December 2014 (UTC)

See if the additional text on classification is clear. JuanTamad (talk) 00:48, 6 December 2016 (UTC)

Using CDC as reference[edit]

I'm working on a school project and I am wondering if referencing the CDC would be acceptable? We would like to input more information about "prevention" against La Crosse encephalitis virus (LACV). Here is what we would like to add, "Prevention measures against LACV include reducing exposure to mosquito bites. Use repellent such as DEET and picaridin, while spending time outside, especially at during the daytime - from dawn until dusk. Aedes triseriatus mosquitoes that transmit (LACV) are most active during the day. Wear long sleeves, pants and socks while outdoors. Ensure all screens are in good condition to prevent mosquitoes from entering your home. Aedes triseriatus prefer treeholes to lay eggs in. Also, remove stagnant water such as old tires, birdbaths, flower pots, and barrels". [1]

There is also a few statistics that I believe could be useful. According to the CDC, between 2004 and 2013 there were 787 total cases of La Crosse encephalitis and 11 deaths in the U.S. [2]

Looking at the distribution of cases across the United States by state, between 2004 and 2013 the most cases of La Crosse encephalitis was in North Carolina. North Carolina had 184 total cases, followed by Ohio with 178 total cases. [3]


Thank you. --Tchris1 (talk) 00:27, 6 December 2016 (UTC)

  1. ^ "La Crosse Encephalitis: Prevention". Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 6 December 2016. 
  2. ^ CDC. "La Crosse virus disease cases and deaths reported to CDC by year and clinical presentation, 2004-2013" (PDF). Retrieved 6 December 2016. 
  3. ^ CDC. "La Crosse virus disease cases reported to CDC by state, 2004–2013" (PDF). CDC. Retrieved 8 December 2016.