Talk:Large Hadron Collider

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could we see a collision?[edit]

I'm trying to get my head around the relative intensity of these collisions. If I was a "ghost", and could stick my head in the collision zone and observe, would I see nothing? Very faint sparks? A blinding flash? What? Pb8bije6a7b6a3w (talk) 00:45, 25 May 2014 (UTC)

The maximal power at the interaction point was about 900 W so far, leading to a very intense stream of high-energetic particles that would probably look very bright, independent of the viewing direction as the particles just go through a human head. Related: Anatoli Bugorski --mfb (talk) 10:18, 4 November 2014 (UTC)

Nonsense in the first paragraph[edit]

The third sentence in the lead is wrong. It states "Its spreads in an area of 27 km." This is complete nonsense since "27 km" cannot be an area! Please fix. CaesarsPalaceDude (talk) 22:46, 24 December 2014 (UTC)

This appears to be fixed. Delamaran (talk) 05:28, 24 January 2015 (UTC)

No history of origin of LHC[edit]

There is no mention of pre-operational history of the LHC or origins of the project. "It is made to seem as though it dropped out of the sky in 2008." — as already been stated in page talk by anonymous. — andrybak (talk) 00:33, 23 March 2015 (UTC)

The (featured :)) German article has a section about the history, including some English references. That can be used as guideline. --mfb (talk) 14:08, 23 March 2015 (UTC)

Safety of particle collisions[edit]

The first sentence of the section reads 'The experiments at the Large Hadron Collider sparked fears that the particle collisions might produce doomsday phenomena, involving the production of stable microscopic black holes or the creation of hypothetical particles called strangelets.' But there is no explanation of why either event might be considered dangerous. 86.144.179.132 (talk) 17:46, 5 April 2015 (UTC)

Yes, there is no explanation, that is correct. Maybe "because some people are actively looking for something to fear", but that is speculation and has nothing to do with the LHC. --mfb (talk) 18:19, 5 April 2015 (UTC)

Higgs boson[edit]

In the introduction it says the LHC will "[...] particularly prove or disprove the existence of the theorized Higgs boson[3]." I thought it was proven and that even a Nobel Price was given for its discovery. Does it need an update? Cheers, BatteryIncluded (talk) 00:53, 8 April 2015 (UTC)

See the following sentence for the current status. A particle has been discovered that agrees with the predictions for the standard model in every observation so far (more than 50 papers with experimental results about it now). Some seem to wait for a magical "it is the SM Higgs!" moment which will never come as measurements just get more and more precise over time. --mfb (talk) 09:40, 8 April 2015 (UTC)