Talk:Latin America

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Article Collaboration and Improvement Drive This article was on the Article Collaboration and Improvement Drive for the week of April 9, 2006.


Black Nicaraguans[edit]

This article is incorrect in that it states Nicaragua has 0% black people. This is not true, about 10% of Nicaragua's population is black, it has the most black people(in terms of numbers not percentages) of any Central American country.


List of cities by population is incorrect.[edit]

Please use this to update list: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Latin_American_cities_by_population

As an example, Santo Domingo, capital of the Dominican Republic is actually the 7th largest Latin American city but it is not currently present in this article.

São Paulo is the largest city in Latin America, not Mexico city! I don't know who keeps changing it, but there's no need for lies just so your city would look bigger! TitusPHB (talk) 06:22, 6 August 2017 (UTC)

@TitusPHB: Can you provide us with a reliable source that verifies the change you want to make? According to this interactive map, currently cited in the article, it would appear the Mexico City metropolitan area has a larger population than the São Paulo metropolitan area. Note that the "metropolitan area" of a city is often different from the administrative boundaries of the city. Mz7 (talk) 12:53, 6 August 2017 (UTC)


@Mz7: If you read your "reliable source" you'll see that they're talking about POPULATIONAL DENSITY! And you asked me for a reliable source to comprovante what im saying it's true, so here's "Word Population Review" to proof what I'm saying. Mexico city have a population of 8.9 Million according to it: http://worldpopulationreview.com/world-cities/mexico-city-population/ while São Paulo, a population of 12 Million: http://worldpopulationreview.com/world-cities/sao-paulo-population/

And if you still have questions, just search on Google for "Mexico City population" and "São Paulo population" and you don't even have to click any link, Google it self tells you the numbers. Now stop telling lies to yourself and changing Wikipedia's article so Mexico City looks bigger. Thx

@TitusPHB:, The sources that you are citing are for the cities proper, while the ranking that you keep changing in the article is for metro areas. And no, the interactive map that Mz7 linked does not just give statistics for population density, it shows the population of the metro areas.--Tdl1060 (talk) 00:30, 7 August 2017 (UTC)


@Tdl1060:, OH MY FREAKING GOSH, no one cares to metro area! The largest city in Latin America is São Paulo and everybody knows that cities we measure by its population. Using "metros" is just an excuse to keep changing it! Stop the BS


@Samsara:, Help me to fix this problem!

-Cities are measured by the number of people in it, not by metros!

-The population of Brazil is no longer 204M, is already 210M.

-Mexico IS NOT a member of BRICS: B - Brazil R - Russia I - India C - China S - South Africa! That's it... No M for Mexico there.

- Mexico City doesn't have a higher GDP per capita than São Paulo.

- The 2 most spoke languages in Latin America is Spanish and BRAZILIAN Portuguese.

- Brazil doesn't have the highest amount of homicides in Latin America, that's Venezuela followed by Mexico.

This "Latin America" description it's all wrong and i cant fix it! So please, do it urself then.. But don't leave as it is or otherwise u'll be sharing fake information! Thx


HERE'S A CORRECTED VERSION FOR YOU!

Latin America[a]
Latin America (orthographic projection).svg
Area 19,197,000 km2 (7,412,000 sq mi)[1]
Population 626,741,000 (2015 est.)[2][b]
Population density 31/km2 (80/sq mi)
Demonym Latin American
Countries 20[c]
Dependencies 13
Largest cities 1. São Paulo according to http://worldpopulationreview.com/world-cities/sao-paulo-population/
2. Mexico City according to http://worldpopulationreview.com/world-cities/mexico-city-population/
3. Buenos Aires
4. Rio de Janeiro
5. Bogotá
6. Lima
7. Santiago
8. Belo Horizonte
9. Guadalajara
10. Monterrey

Latin America[a] is a group of countries and dependencies in the Americas where Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese are predominant. The term originated in 19th century France as Amérique latine to consider French-speaking territories in the Americas (Haiti, French Guiana, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Saint Martin, Saint Barthélemy) along with the larger group of countries where Spanish and Brazilian Portuguese languages prevailed. It is therefore broader than the terms Ibero-America or Hispanic America—though it usually excludes French Canada, Brazilian Portuguese and modern French Louisiana.

Latin America consists of nineteen sovereign states and several territories and dependencies which cover an area that stretches from the northern border of Mexico to the southern tip of South America, including the Caribbean. It has an area of approximately 19,197,000 km2 (7,412,000 sq mi),[1] almost 13% of the Earth's land surface area. As of 2015, its population was estimated at more than 626 million[2][b] and in 2014, Latin America had a combined nominal GDP of 5,573,397 million USD[3] and a GDP PPP of 7,531,585 million USD.[3][4]

The term "Latin America" was first used in a 1856 conference with the title "Initiative of the America. Idea for a Federal Congress of Republics" (Iniciativa de la América. Idea de un Congreso Federal de las Repúblicas),[5] by the Chilean politician Francisco Bilbao. In such conference, he called for the creation of a confederation of Latin American republics to better search for their common defense and prosperity, without political or economic barriers between them. In the same work, he also detailed the principles under which such a confederation should work.

References

  1. ^ a b "World Development Indicators: Rural environment and land use". World Development Indicators, The World Bank. World Bank. Retrieved September 12, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Cite error: The named reference UN_pop was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  3. ^ a b "GDP Current and PPP estimates for 2014". Imf.org. 2014. Retrieved 2014-08-14. 
  4. ^ "GDP Current and PPP estimates for 2014". Imf.org. 2014. Retrieved 2014-08-14. 
  5. ^ Bilbao, Francisco. "Francisco Bilbao, Iniciativa de la América. Idea de un Congreso Federal de las Repúblicas, París 22 junio 1856". Retrieved 16 July 2017. 

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I see several mistakes there! You LITERALLY just added information instead of fixing or updating informations that you already have! There's a list of things you gotta change before updating it:

-Cities are measured by the number of people in it, not by metros! So São Paulo is the largest city in Latin America, not Mexico City, which takes the 2nd place.

-The population of Brazil is no longer 204M, is already 210M.

-Mexico IS NOT a member of BRICS: B - Brazil R - Russia I - India C - China S - South Africa! That's it... No M for Mexico there.

- Mexico City doesn't have a higher GDP per capita than São Paulo.

- The 2 most spoke languages in Latin America is Spanish and BRAZILIAN Portuguese.

- Brazil doesn't have the highest amount of homicides in Latin America, that's Venezuela followed by Mexico.

Mexico is not a BRICS member[edit]

Why are you guys putting Mexico as a BRICS member?? B- Brazil | R- Russia | I- India | C- China | S- South Africa

This article only mentions BRICS once, in passing, and it states that Mexico will be among "the largest economies in the world", not a member of BRICS. Mz7 (talk) 12:45, 6 August 2017 (UTC)

Metropolitan area vs. administrative boundaries[edit]

So, we have one contributor here who is adamant about switching the measure of population from number of people in the metropolitan area of a city to the number of people within the administrative boundaries of a city. In attempting to formulate a response to this user, I was left wondering, why do we use the metropolitan areas of the cities in this article? It seems population within administrative boundaries is the more popular population gauge, and my intuition is that more readers would be looking for that. It would also allow the article to align with List of Latin American cities by population. Mz7 (talk) 16:26, 8 August 2017 (UTC)

Black population in Nicaragua[edit]

The CIA World Factbook states that Wikipedia has a population of 6,025,951 as of July 2017. Of this population, 9% are black. This translates to about 542335 black people in Nicaragua.

Tanakachingonzo (talk) 15:51, 8 September 2017 (UTC)[1]


Racial Inequality in Latin America Not Discussed[edit]

Overall I believe this article to be very comprehensive, both speaking about Latin America in general terms (where appropriate) and distinguishing between different countries as well. Everything is relevant and the information is presented in a neutral informative way. There is an extensive list of reputable, accessible sources.

Where I feel it is lacking is discussion on racial inequality. While there is a small section on inequality it serves only to inform readers about wealth inequality (and serves as a small introduction to the main page: Wealth Inequality in Latin America.) My suggestions to improve this page so that there is a more comprehensive understanding of the social and economic dynamic in Latin American countries is to include more information on Racial Inequality and its effects in Latin America. I feel as though this is an important factor in the way that Latin American society functions and is a viewpoint severely underrepresented by this article.

Information on this page specifically would not need to be too extensive, as there needs to be a separate page on Racial Inequality in Latin America as well (it should be noted that the main page for information is separate similar to the way in which it denotes the main page for wealth inequality in separate). Additionally, perhaps the order of the sections could be rearranged so that demography is right before the inequality section?

GHumphrey97 (talk) 18:53, 14 September 2017 (UTC)
Cite error: There are <ref group=lower-alpha> tags or {{efn}} templates on this page, but the references will not show without a {{reflist|group=lower-alpha}} template or {{notelist}} template (see the help page).