Talk:Light art

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Visual arts (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Visual arts, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of visual arts on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the quality scale.
 

Redirection[edit]

I have redirected this to Light Sculpture. It could be done the other way. Research Method (talk) 00:47, 30 October 2008 (UTC)

I think they need to be merged there is not enough info on light sculpture —Preceding unsigned comment added by 146.227.1.14 (talk) 14:16, 11 January 2011 (UTC)

Yes, merge. Johnbod (talk) 04:18, 14 February 2011 (UTC)

Plato[edit]

Required? Feels an irrelevant name-drop.Da5nsy (talk) 11:43, 2 September 2013 (UTC)

Suggestion regarding famous light artists[edit]

Folks:

Could I suggest that the criteria for selecting famous or notable light artists come from some association? I know in the glass art world, there is a very well regarded group called the Glass Art Society.

Does anyone know if there is such an organization for light artists?

Orphaned references in Light art[edit]

I check pages listed in Category:Pages with incorrect ref formatting to try to fix reference errors. One of the things I do is look for content for orphaned references in wikilinked articles. I have found content for some of Light art's orphans, the problem is that I found more than one version. I can't determine which (if any) is correct for this article, so I am asking for a sentient editor to look it over and copy the correct ref content into this article.

Reference named "Stern":

  • From Neon lighting: Stern, Rudi (1988). The New Let There Be Neon. H. N. Abrams. pp. 16–33. ISBN 978-0-8109-1299-1. 
  • From Michael Hayden (artist): Stern, Rudi (1990). Contemporary Neon. Retail Reporting Corp. ISBN 978-0-934590-37-2. California artist Michael Hayden was selected to design a lighting sculpture synchronized with music and orchestrated with architecture. Hayden's solution, Sky's the Limit, uses 466 neon tubes and extends 744 feet. 

I apologize if any of the above are effectively identical; I am just a simple computer program, so I can't determine whether minor differences are significant or not. AnomieBOT 13:57, 19 June 2015 (UTC)

Major cleanup and reorganization needed[edit]

This article has been degenerating into a disorganized mess, including duplications of other existing articles and lists. I started by trying to organize the sections into some sort of historical sequence, but a lot more cleanup is still needed. Some sections such as the one on "Neon art" seem to be added in complete ignorance of the existence of other articles covering the same subject. The duplicate content needs to be deleted or moved to the main article, and replaced by a brief summary. I have added some Wikilinks to the main articles, but there may be more that need to be added.

Other sections of this article are really lists that need to be consolidated with other list articles or categories, or created as such. Extensive lists do not belong here in a non-list article. Do not copy or move chunks of other existing Wikipedia articles to here, unless you describe and discuss your proposed changes both here and at the article you are proposing to move content from.

See the articles on Kinetic art, Op art, and Neon art for examples of comparable Wikipedia articles that are in somewhat better shape. While they all need further work, they at least have some coherence and structure. Reify-tech (talk) 20:15, 7 July 2015 (UTC)

Some fixes[edit]

I noticed a few grammatical and punctuation errors, so I went ahead and fixed those in the Overview and Antecedents. Also, I inserted a word within the second paragraph of the Overview because it contained a sentence fragment; light bulb is spelled with two words, not one; and, 3-D is meant to have a dash in between, but I suspect most people forget that. Rentorawr (talk) 02:11, 21 October 2015 (UTC)

Grammar and Cohesion[edit]

There are a few categories that make absolutely zero sense, particularly light festivals. It is so confusing to read that a lot of the meaning is lost. I'm not sure how best to edit it so that it makes sense and still fits in the context of the entire article. Sickhypnotic (talk) 14:25, 8 August 2016 (UTC)

Yes I get that feeling too. It needs a restructure and some research to nut it out, including a search of mainstream new media for articles in the last 10 years about exhibitions and artists. It also needs a search through more academic texts to ascertain how established it is and its position in the rest of visual arts needs to clarified. This is not uncommon for articles on contemporary genres across all arts. - Shiftchange (talk) 06:57, 9 August 2016 (UTC)
I found some really good information regarding specific light artists, just gotta organize it all. Then I can work on expanding that section. Also, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art must be really into promoting light art as a medium, because they have a lot of information on it, as well as installations and light festivals throughout San Francisco. Sickhypnotic (talk) 12:28, 10 August 2016 (UTC)
I was able to find very little on "light art" at sfmoma.org using its own search engine and only one page using Google (with the search <site:www.sfmoma.org "light art">), and none of it used the term "light art", which sounds like Denglish, "easy, not serious art", a bad, literal translation of the German "lichtkunst". In fact, i wasn't able to find the term in any reliable source written by a native speaker, and i searched pretty long using worldcat.org, onelook.com, and Google searches of books, US and UK university sites, dictionaries, and glossaries.
There are other problems in this article that are almost as serious and weird, such as this edit by an obviously well informed anonymous editor which however includes an "illiterate" indication of the source ("light matters a closer look at the ideas behind their work" author Glen Shum), and the fact that no one has corrected or checked or removed it in 2,5 years. It may even be an honest test of how Wikipedia works: Despite being hidden in a serious and impressive edit, it doesn't pretend to be impressive and is even blatantly incorrect and looks like a joke. And no mention of a Glen Shum writing on art exists online according to Google and no book by anyone with that name exists according to worldcat.org and direct library searches. --Espoo (talk) 08:15, 3 December 2017 (UTC)
OK, I was able to find one reliable source for "light art" written by a native speaker, but it's interesting that the term is usually avoided in texts by native speakers, which instead usually use "light installation/sculpture" etc. or add an adjective "kinetic light art" to prevent the obvious possible misunderstanding. --Espoo (talk) 09:51, 3 December 2017 (UTC)