Talk:Lightning

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Former good article nominee Lightning was a good articles nominee, but did not meet the good article criteria at the time. There are suggestions below for improving the article. Once these issues have been addressed, the article can be renominated. Editors may also seek a reassessment of the decision if they believe there was a mistake.
Article milestones
Date Process Result
October 31, 2005 Peer review Reviewed
October 16, 2006 Good article nominee Not listed
Current status: Former good article nominee
WikiProject Physics (Rated B-class, Mid-importance)
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Nitrogen[edit]

This article does not have a part about lightning and the nitrogen cycle. Where can I find such information? Or just add some information in the article.

Qwertyxp2000 (talk) 05:25, 10 October 2014 (UTC)

Just google "lighting and hydrogen" and you will find stuff like this. Richerman (talk) 06:02, 10 October 2014 (UTC)
Qwertyxp2000 should do his own research. — Preceding unsigned comment added by White909090lightning (talkcontribs) 12:41, 5 April 2015 (UTC)

Not accurate[edit]

The article talks about the religion of the Bantu tribes. There are hundreds of Bantu languages and ideas need not be the same for all. — Preceding unsigned comment added by White909090lightning (talkcontribs) 12:53, 5 April 2015 (UTC)

Colors used to denote polarity in undermentioned illustration are not conventional.[edit]

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/dc/Leaderlightnig.gif/220px-Leaderlightnig.gif

The negative leader from the cloud is presently red, conversely the positive leader from the ground is blue. Automotive transport convention and almost universally RED signifies POSITIVE, and BLACK or BLUE signifies NEGATIVE. The negative color choice seems to be fairly flexible but the red for positive is almost set in stone (in my experience.)

I have not checked yet if there is an article on wire color coding. A short note for anyone who may start one. In 3 phase electricity one convention is to use RED, WHITE, and BLUE for live (above ground) phases and BLACK for the NEUTRAL. Considering the USA standard for 2 phase supply 115VAC - NEUTRAL - 115VAC (where the 2 115VAC lines have 230VAC potential between them) use RED for 115VAC, WHITE for NEUTRAL, and BLACK for the other 115VAC line, and considering the use RED and BLACK in DC systems, persons working on unknown systems should be aware of these possible pitfalls. Ecstatist (talk) 00:53, 10 September 2015 (UTC)

Bolt from the Blue[edit]

Currently the page both describes a 'bolt from the blue' as a name for clear-air lightning [which I believe to be correct], in the main text, and as a name for anvil-to-ground lightning in the anvil-to-ground photo-caption [which does not make sense to me]. I'm not going to make the edit unless there's actually two trends to the usage, but I think it's likely to be a joke or error of some kind. 65.95.145.103 (talk) 15:39, 23 October 2015 (UTC)

  • Actually, it is both. "A bolt from the blue", a metaphor for something coming out of nowhere, originally comes from a lightning strike from a blue sky. However, in the science community, it is also used to describe anvil-to-ground lightning. The reason for this is that anvil-to-ground lightning is a lightning bolt which develops "over" the thunderstorm cloud (in the blue), and travels generally straight down through the cloud and then strikes the ground, creating an anvil through the cloud. "Cloud to Ground" lightning isn't Anvil lightning. That strike comes from the cloud itself, not above it. You may be confusing the two. If you'd like to make an edit, you can word it so that it educates the reader that the term is "also used to describe".... I am not part of the science community, so you better check my facts, however, I remember studying this subject in college, and that's exactly how I remember it.-Pocketthis (talk) 16:43, 23 October 2015 (UTC)
  • No action was taken, so I made an edit to improve, and clarify the anvil strike caption.-thanks-Pocketthis (talk) 19:12, 23 October 2015 (UTC)

Strobe effect of GIFs may cause reactions in epileptics?[edit]

The cartoon gif, and maybe other gifs, may cause some photosensative epileptics to be affected. Yosjwuwkjd (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 23:39, 25 July 2016 (UTC)

Can the images be rearranged and separated? MOS:ANIMATION prescribes a hard limit on this: "animations must not produce more than three flashes in any one-second period. Content that flashes more than that limit is known to cause seizures.[1]" —C.Fred (talk) 23:44, 25 July 2016 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ "Guideline 2.3 Seizures: Do not design content in a way that is known to cause seizures.". Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0. W3C. 11 December 2008. Retrieved 28 May 2015. 
I've requested assistance at Wikipedia talk:Manual of Style/Accessibility. —C.Fred (talk) 23:51, 25 July 2016 (UTC)