Talk:Limewater

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lime water in tortillas[edit]

No sources to state that lime water is used to make tortillas. IolakanaT 19:45, 1 October 2006 (UTC)

I put back the statement and sourced it. Note the journal article looks at it from the point of view (as do most I found) of how well calcium is absorbed into the body. Also available is the article at http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/abstract/135/11/2578 for more analysis on it. Kevin_b_er 02:28, 2 October 2006 (UTC)

German wikipedia[edit]

Maybe someone could add a link from Kalkwasser in the Misc. section to the German Wikipedia page on Kalkwasser? I'm not sure how to link to pages in other language wikipedias... Amicianthony (talk) 18:02, 30 April 2009 (UTC)

Wrong spelling[edit]

This mistake is way too obvious to miss. They are not spelt separately. It's 'limewater', not 'lime water'. I have checked with many dictionaries and Oxford Dictionary of Science. It's spelt as 'limewater', not 'lime water'. 'Limewater' refers to calcium hydroxide solution, 'lime water' refers to water made from lime. Please correct this mistake. Thanks. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 124.13.7.43 (talk) 07:18, 3 September 2011 (UTC)

  • Agreed. The included references use "limewater". --SmokeyJoe (talk) 11:38, 13 June 2012 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page or in a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: moved. No actual opposes in over two weeks and the nominator and IP in the above sections have solid arguments. Jenks24 (talk) 14:44, 28 June 2012 (UTC)



Lime waterLimewater

The commonname is limewater. The references use "limewater". Lime water is not used for calcium hydroxide solutions, but is read as water containing lime (the fruit) juice. The move requested above, on this talk page. Someone created the redirect at Limewater to Lime water, preventing me from doing the move. Relisted. Jenks24 (talk) 01:27, 21 June 2012 (UTC) --SmokeyJoe (talk) 11:43, 13 June 2012 (UTC)

  • Comment: The spaced lime water is used in some major English-language dictionaries, such as Canadian Oxford, Concise Oxford, and Oxford Dictionary of English. SSR (talk) 07:09, 19 June 2012 (UTC)
The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page or in a move review. No further edits should be made to this section.


Seeing how this appears to have been resolved without opposition, I'm removing that ugly dispute tag from the page itself. Niceoboe (talk) 05:35, 30 September 2012 (UTC)

Section Medicine cut (to here)[edit]

I cut the following section from the article because it appears to be unsourced, a good yarn, and not of serious educational value. --SmokeyJoe (talk) 12:05, 13 June 2012 (UTC)

When the old vaudeville-style medicine shows promoting various patent medicines were in full swing, limewater was often used as a part of the act. The salesperson would have an audience member blow through a straw into a glass of limewater. Since the exhaled gas is carbon dioxide, the water would turn cloudy; the huckster then announced that this reaction proved that the audience member suffered from some ailment. If too much carbon dioxide comes into contact with the cloudy limewater, it will cause the calcium carbonate precipitate to redissolve to form soluble calcium bicarbonate.

CaCO3(s) + CO2(g) + H2O(l) → Ca(HCO3)2(aq)

The huckster had a patent medicine bottle filled with vinegar or some similar acid. He then would pour some of the acid into the glass of cloudy limewater. The acid reacted with the calcium carbonate, and the water would instantly clear. This demonstrated the potent effect of the nostrum he was selling to eliminate the "disease" demonstrated by the audience member.

Comment: I would just like to put in a plug for those of us who study popular culture and/or the history of medicine that we find precisely this kind of anecdote interesting and useful--if only it can be cited and verified. This application of science outside the laboratory could indeed be of "serious educational value" for us. However, I do not know where this story comes from. Tchussle (talk) 14:23, 28 August 2012 (UTC)

The usual frustrations of Wiki ...[edit]

This article is referenced by the article Tortilla - and I am sure by others too - via Nixtamalization. Arriving here the article begins by stating that "Limewater is the common name ..." but then immediately dives into chemistry. The reader must go to the article Calcium hydroxide to discover what this historically common product was, in common terms. However the trail then ends with the statement there that: "Calcium hydroxide is produced commercially by treating lime with water". Now, bearing in mind that the original object of research was the traditional manufacture of tortillas, both the length of the research trail required to find this basic information and the paucity of its conclusion is frustrating. What are the available source(s) for lime, those that would have been used for instance in rural Mexico in the 19th century? How is and was this lime then "treated" to result in limewater? I find I am left with a heap of chemistry jargon and little else, and this despite all the work that has gone into writing the four artciles concerned. LookingGlass (talk) 11:51, 19 October 2014 (UTC)

Carbon Dioxide sink[edit]

Are there applications for Limewater to remove carbon dioxide in the context of global warming? Or has any experimentation along these lines taken place? If so, should it be mentioned here? 141.6.11.24 (talk) 09:52, 14 March 2016 (UTC)

Tanning[edit]

Hi. I would recommend more reference to the use in tanning. I have found old native american stone tools including tools for cutting fleshing and tanning skins and have found chunks of high grade limestone apparently used for the purpose. This lime and many of the other stones had to be imported to this area. Fencelizard (talk) 16:10, 26 March 2017 (UTC)