Talk:Timeline of Irish inventions and discoveries

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Untitled[edit]

this is not very good info

the title says northern irish inventions but the two i checked aren't from the north, they were Navan and clare. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Preally (talkcontribs) 23:13, 25 February 2008 (UTC)

Potato????[edit]

What the heck was "potato" doing on here? How can you invent a potato? If I'm not mistaken potatos were originally from Chile and Peru and merely introduced to Ireland before spreading to the rest of Europe. Seriously who put that on there? Thats just silly and if its meant as some kind of joke then I don't find it very funny. I'm removing it / editing it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Kentynet (talkcontribs) 13:24, 25 February 2010 (UTC)

This article needs a major clean up[edit]

Upon looking at some of these discoveries and claims it seems someones having a laugh or clutching at straws? I have removed the following because;

Grannogs - Most Irish Crannogs date from the middle ages and the oldest from Ballinderry (1200-600BC).[1] however the oldest dated crannog isnt Irish it comes from Loch Olabhat on North Uist Scotland and may be the earliest crannóg, dated to 3200-2800 BC in the Neolithic period. As of yet the crannog due to material evidence isnt Irish.

Lunar Charts - Its only speculation such charts are actually lunar charts. The first scientificually accurate lunar charts were made by Galleleo

Uilleann pipes - These pipes are spread over a wide area and descend from the erlier pastoral pipes and Union pipes. The term Uillean isnt even from the 19th century. the Taylor brothers didnt invent the instrument in the 19th century they only modified an already existing instrument that became known as an Irish pipe later on. The pastoral and union pipes of the 18-19th centuries had innovators and desingers across the British Isles. Fionaven (talk) 20:30, 28 June 2010 (UTC)

Gaelic handball[edit]

I have removed gaelic handball from the article as the sport is recorded in 1427 which is 200 years before the first Irish references in this published book [2] ZauRee (talk) 08:48, 14 July 2011 (UTC)

Pneumatic tyre patent[edit]

I don't know if this qualifies but the patent application was made from Dublin by (Scotsman) John Boyd Dunlop based at Oriel House, Westland Row.PatrickGuinness (talk) 19:30, 16 September 2014 (UTC)

Timeline[edit]

This article is presented as a Wikipedia:Timeline. If there are no objections, propose moving it to Timeline of Irish inventions and discoveries similar to Timeline of United States inventions and discoveries. Whizz40 (talk) 05:48, 12 July 2015 (UTC)

Move completed. Whizz40 (talk) 08:07, 11 October 2015 (UTC)

Joseph black[edit]

Joseph Black had an Irish father and grew up in Ireland, so would it accurate to add his discoveries to this page?

Nick876436 (talk) 01:41, 8 October 2016 (UTC)

  1. ^ national handbook of underwater archaeology By Carol Ruppé, Jan Barstadch
  2. ^ Sports and games of the 18th and 19th centuries Greenwood Publishing Group, 2003 p84