Talk:List of fictional feral children

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Untitled[edit]

Shasta shifts the Fishboy pic out to the left on larger monitors, like so:

             shasta
             shasta
             shasta
 fishboy     shasta
 fishboy     shasta
 fishboy
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I suppose if they were all resized, that might take care of it, or realigned somehow. Koyaanis Qatsi 01:03 3 Jul 2003 (UTC)

I've noticed a few problems with images and text wrapping on Wikipedia, especially when there's more than one image on a page. The Shasta cover is a bit disproportionate to the other images anyway, so I'll probably replace it with a smaller one, probably by this weekend, and we'll see if that fixes it. Lee M 02:10 10 Jul 2003 (UTC)
PS I didn't spot your message for a week? Oh, dear. Well, I may be slow but I get there in the end. (There's probably a filthy joke in there somewhere....)

I'm currently researching some other feral children novels that I've heard about, and once I have sufficient information I should be able to do a significant expansion of the article. - Lee M 01:43, 4 Sep 2003 (UTC)


MARCH 2005: This article has grown a bit haphazardly and could probably do with some judicious reorganising, if anyone feels up to the job. Lee M 14:03, 4 Mar 2005 (UTC)

Hogwarts and Romulus and Remus[edit]

Remus, is killed by his brother Romulus in the mythology of the founding of Rome. There is no mention of Hogwarts or of any other Harry Potter fiction. Facts now corrected in the article, but really, how did it get in there in the first place? Please perform facts checks people.

Mowgli[edit]

I cut the following from the article, with reference to Rudyard Kipling's Mowgli:

He might be seen as a metaphor for the British Raj - a member of a "superior" race whose destiny is to rule the "inferior" races; a jungle version of the white man's burden.

As this is unreferenced, it appears to be original research, but it's also not borne out by the text. Mowgli is of native stock and not white. At one point in the stories he is adopted by local villagers, where an attempt is made to impose a traditional child's role on him. As an adult he is an employee of the British Raj in a job that would naturally be handed out to natives. The "final" Mowgli story, In the Rukh, where his final situation is employed, married, and with children, was actually the first to be written, so was the end envisioned for the character all through The Jungle Books. TCC (talk) (contribs) 23:11, 15 March 2006 (UTC)

This is a bit of a belated reply, but I didn't mean to imply that Mowgli was actually white. However, it seems to me from Kipling's comparison between Mowgli and some of the other Indians in "In the Rukh" that Kipling considered Mowgli to be "white on the inside". Lee M 15:17, 9 February 2007 (UTC)

The Thing[edit]

I would add The Thing from Gormenghast, but my copy is in a different country ATM. Hairy Dude 22:26, 31 May 2006 (UTC)

The Ones who Walk Away from Omelas[edit]

I don't believe the neglected child from Omelas really counts as feral in the sense it's generally used in this article. Of course, Le Guin's child was a fairly blatant political metaphor for all of the starving and abused human beings in this world who are kept poor so that others can remain rich. Lee M 15:17, 9 February 2007 (UTC)

Pyrenee, and Some Possible Additions[edit]

I think saying that Pyrenee may not be published in America because it has a nude child is violating Wikipedia standards. It's a criticism of culture in the Americas that has nothing to do with Feral Children in Mythology. This year in America Alan Moore's Lost Girls was published which depicts sexually explicit versions of popular late 19th and early 20th century childrens books. Wendy Darlings story features characters as young as 12 involved in sexual experimentation. On another note; I feel that the character San from the animated film Princess Mononoke should definetly be listed. Possibly The Wild Boys from the William S. Burroughs Novel of the same name; although because it is about a society boys who have developed their own culture I don't know if that will qualify as feral.

If it said that american position was immoral, sad, unfortunate or fotunate, moral, virtuous, it would have been a violation of WP:NPOV. Ironically, your choice of example (pornographic book? sexual experimentation? WTF?) only served to restate the american stance on nudity. --Cubbi 17:29, 18 September 2007 (UTC)

Not Mentioned Yet[edit]

A feral boy, Donnie, from the American cartoon, The Wild Thornberrys. --Joe Webster 14:01, 21 October 2007 (UTC)

And : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_Nature_%28film%29

Where's the mythology part?[edit]

Three lines at the beginning just to mention Enkidu and Romulus and Remus? Seems very little to me to be mentioned in the title. Nazroon (talk) 21:44, 19 November 2007 (UTC)

Hayy Ibn Yaqzan[edit]

A model example of a feral human in medieval literature. Just added it. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.22.217.228 (talk) 20:45, 16 December 2007 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Fishboy-sm.png[edit]

Nuvola apps important.svg

Image:Fishboy-sm.png is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images lacking such an explanation can be deleted one week after being tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.


Save_Us_229 00:28, 4 January 2008 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Pyrenee-sm.jpg[edit]

Nuvola apps important.svg

Image:Pyrenee-sm.jpg is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images lacking such an explanation can be deleted one week after being tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.


Save_Us_229 00:43, 4 January 2008 (UTC)

Romulus and Remus weren't feral children, nor were they "raised" by a she-wolf. A wolf nursed the babies and kept them safe for a short time before a shepherd found them. They're no more feral children than Moses. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.228.75.168 (talk) 15:07, 23 February 2016 (UTC)