Talk:Low-frequency effects

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Contradiction[edit]

The article contradicts itself:

"This track is normally sent to a speaker that is specially designed for low-pitched sounds called the subwoofer"

and then later:

"The LFE channel content is not the same as the content of a subwoofer-out jack."

The latter sentence is true.

This article sounds like an advertisement. Convince me that this is real, and not just some buzzword that Dolby made up to sell more 5.1 systems. Freedrull (talk) 02:58, 2 February 2010 (UTC)

No, both sentences are true. The sub-woofer feed can include bass from all the channels, so can be different from the LFE channel. Also, the only time the LFE channel would not be sent to the sub-woofer is when there is no sub-woofer. As for LFE being a buzzword, the channel exists on movie soundtracks, DVDs, etc. HairyWombat 19:46, 8 January 2011 (UTC)

LFE vs subwoofer[edit]

I think it would be useful to add a section explaining the difference between LFE signal and subwoofer feed. Also I'm not sure if the part of the article mentioning Low-pitched musical arts is correct. If I'm right, LFE signal contains only sound effects, such as explosions or earthquake, not music. Low musical notes should be in other channels (and added to subwoofer feed by the decoder if the speakers can't handle them), not in LFE. But I'm not 100% sure, so I leave the edit to a more informed person. 85.207.18.222 (talk) 23:44, 4 February 2017 (UTC)

Move to "... effects"[edit]

The correct name of the LFE channel is low-frequency effects channel. Dolby invented it, and that is what they call it; see, for example, the following Dolby documents:

I will therefore move this article to a new name, and correct the content. HairyWombat 22:06, 8 January 2011 (UTC)

Home Theater Systems[edit]

I changed the statement "...the enhanced sound option was stereo high-fidelity sound..." to include mention of Dolby Surround (introduced in 1982) and Dolby Pro Logic (introduced in 1987), both available prior to the 2000's-era home theater systems being discussed here. --Jimdavis4u (talk) 18:26, 19 September 2012 (UTC)