Talk:Low-k dielectric

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I don't agree with the discussion about "kappa" vs. "kay" . The "k" used in the english language is the same letter as "k" present in the greek alphabet, and the words "kay" and "kappa" are just different names for the same letter. It is not like "A" and alpha that, looking graphically similar, are two distinct letters, one from the latin alphabet and the other from the greek. Another case is Y, the other greek letter used in the english alphabet. All the remaining letters are latin letters or derivatives (V, W). --Joaosampaio 10:21, 2 June 2007 (UTC)

$$$$$$ “Replacing the silicon dioxide with a low-κ dielectric of the same thickness reduces parasitic capacitance, enabling faster switching speeds and lower heat dissipation.”

The below statement is more accurate and perhaps should replace the above statement in the opening description for Low K dielectric.

“Replacing the silicon dioxide with a low-κ dielectric of the same thickness reduces parasitic capacitance, enabling faster switching speeds, lower dynamic power consumption and lower heating in integrated circuits, all of which are good for circuit performance (and reliability). Low K dielectric also reduces cross talk noise which again is good since it reduces the (chance of) spurious switching of critical circuits resulting in failure in (digital) circuits. Low K dielectric also reduces electro migration concerns in sub-micron integrated circuits.” 76.103.137.30 (talk) 07:40, 21 November 2009 (UTC) Raj