Talk:Malaria

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Good article Malaria has been listed as one of the Natural sciences good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it.


map updating needed[edit]

Map is from 2009. Sri Lanka is malaria free zone since 2016 — Preceding unsigned comment added by 175.157.193.240 (talk) 07:37, 1 October 2016 (UTC)

Insecticide in the lead[edit]

This was added "spraying insecticides (which was found to have its own health hazards)". Not all insecticides are associated with health hazards though some are. This is a complicated issue that cannot be presented as simply as this and should IMO be dealt with in the body of the text. Doc James (talk · contribs · email) 11:37, 5 May 2015 (UTC)

War

The section only considers the effects of malaria on soldiers. It does not consider the effects of conflict on the malaria e.g. on the incidence of the disease.

Conflicts often impinge drastically on economies, societies and environments. They will therefore often have deleterious effects on health programmes and other factors which have restraining effects on diseases.

The effects of malaria in wartime on 'innocent" civilians is potentially far greater than the impacts on military endeavours and military personnel. As such the subject ought to be given serious consideration in this section. It most certainly should not be ignored completely. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Kombo the mzungu (talkcontribs) 12:04, 14 December 2015 (UTC)

War

The section only considers the effects of malaria on soldiers. It does not consider the effects of conflict on the malaria e.g. on the incidence of the disease.

Conflicts often impinge drastically on economies, societies and environments. They will therefore often have deleterious effects on health programmes and other factors which have restraining effects on diseases.

The effects of malaria in wartime on 'innocent" civilians is potentially far greater than the impacts on military endeavours and military personnel. As such the subject ought to be given serious consideration in this section. It most certainly should not be ignored completely. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Kombo the mzungu (talkcontribs) 12:08, 14 December 2015 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 29 February 2016[edit]

Link on footnote #72 is broken. It should be http://www.cochrane.org/CD005434/INFECTN_electronic-mosquito-repellents-for-preventing-mosquito-bites-and-malaria-infection Patternmann (talk) 12:38, 29 February 2016 (UTC)

Done - thank you for catching that. — soupvector (talk) 12:57, 29 February 2016 (UTC)

Economic effects[edit]

In the lead it states that "Malaria is commonly associated with poverty and has a major negative effect on economic development. In Africa, it is estimated to result in losses of US$12 billion a year due to increased healthcare costs, lost ability to work, and negative effects on tourism.

I think this is misleading. I doubt the reports account in for the fact that it also keeps population growth in check. It's tragic, but I thus assume malaria also has some positive economic/environmental benefits. The best way off course to ãvoid needing these positive effects would be to both eradicate the disease, but also implement better (well, any) population growth control mechanisms, to avoid the population in the tropics and subtropics to increase exponentially and destroy the few forests/biodiversity we have left on this planet in the process. Another method would be unrestricted migration towards western countries (where there's less biodiversity/forests), but that might be controversial for many.

For the malaria eradication: there are 2 links in this article referencing the genetic modification of mosquitoes (species therof able to carry malaria). These are http://science.sciencemag.org/content/298/5591/13 and http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v417/n6887/full/417452a.html I'm wondering though whether these papers detail the GM method in which a gene drive (CRISPR method) is used. See http://www.nature.com/news/gene-drive-mosquitoes-engineered-to-fight-malaria-1.18858 and http://www.nature.com/nbt/journal/v34/n1/full/nbt.3439.html

KVDP (talk) 09:35, 22 May 2016 (UTC)

Your proposition about economic "benefits" of early death due to malaria sounds more like conjecture than science, but if you have reliable sources please provide them. — soupvector (talk) 13:02, 22 May 2016 (UTC)
For the GM modification of mosquitoes; it seems that besides GM approaches on making the mosquitoes unable to transmit the disease at all, there also seems to be research going on on how to make them prefer to sting animals over humans. See
http://journals.plos.org/plosgenetics/article?id=10.1371/journal.pgen.1006303 and http://researchnews.plos.org/2016/09/15/malaria-transmitting-mosquitoes-with-genetic-anomalies-may-prefer-cattle-to-humans/ and https://www.ucdavis.edu/news/mosquito-preference-human-versus-animal-biting-has-genetic-basis/

KVDP (talk) 11:18, 22 April 2017 (UTC)

Number of species of Plasmodium that infect humans is outdated.[edit]

This page lists five species of Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria in humans, but P. ovale has been split into two species, P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri. See http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24478466. --Krabbykabby (talk) 18:10, 19 September 2016 (UTC)

That 2014 review is clearly about two subspecies of P. ovale - a split has been known since at least 2010. As a study focused on those subspecies still noted (in 2015), "Humans can be infected with five malaria parasite species: Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. malariae, P. knowlesi, and P. ovale." (See https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295880/ ) Thus, experts continue to refer to five species. Can you point to a high-quality source that states there are six species? — soupvector (talk) 22:33, 19 September 2016 (UTC)
The review I cited above, this commentary https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2856714/, and this additional review https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27480365 all refer to them as distinct species based on the fact that they cannot recombine and that phylogenetically, they are farther away from each other than other pairs of Plasmodium species. At the very least, the article should be updated to include them and note that there is debate over whether they are subspecies or two truly different species.Krabbykabby (talk) 19:40, 6 October 2016 (UTC)

Under subheading War[edit]

"Malaria was the most important health hazard encountered by U.S. troops in the South Pacific during World War II, where about 500,000 men were infected.[170] According to Joseph Patrick Byrne, "Sixty thousand American soldiers died of malaria during the African and South Pacific campaigns." Sad comment.

Dear Editor: Please consider changing the above sentence as it sounds extremely sad, it really comes across as extremely sad as there is nothing important about a disease, rather the said remedy is further the more important consideration, further there is nothing important about a sad illness such as malaria. Thank you very much. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 198.54.1.102 (talkcontribs) 12:16, 31 January 2017 (UTC)

I changed the word "important" to "significant". I might be misunderstanding what you want. Could you please write the sentence that you wish to see? Blue Rasberry (talk) 15:23, 31 January 2017 (UTC)

UK guidelines for treatment[edit]

Updated doi:10.1016/j.jinf.2016.02.001 JFW | T@lk 14:39, 28 February 2017 (UTC)