Talk:Marketing research

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I have little idea where to fit any information in[edit]

lpI would like to add something to this article regarding methods of collecting data, such as telephone and online surveys, or, as in the old days, knocking on doors. However, the article is highly organized, and I have little idea where to fit any information in. Hyacinth 04:17, 8 Aug 2004 (UTC)

You might want to read quantitative marketing research, statistical survey, questionnaire construction, and qualitative marketing research and see where it fits in best. When I wrote these articles I intended marketing research to be the root article or umbrella article to the other dozen or so marketing research articles. As an umbrella article it would be broad in scope but shallow in depth. With this in mind, Be Bold, add where you feel it best fits. mydogategodshat 17:48, 10 Aug 2004 (UTC)

Methodologies[edit]

I'd agree, as a MR professional, I'd go looking for it under either quant. or qual. methods. dylan555 16:55, 3 Feb 2005 (UTC)

It's "Market Research", not "Marketing Research"[edit]

According to Webster's:

market research - research into the size, location, and makeup of a product market

marketing research - research into the means of promoting, selling, and distributing a product or service

If I research how a company is promoting its products, I am conducting "marketing research". But if I actually research the market for a product, I am conducting "market research".

This entry should NOT be under "marketing research", but directly under "market research".Rcauvin circa middle of 2005

Agreed, when a distinction is made marketing research is a subsection of market research. This page should be renamed. - SimonP 18:26, July 10, 2005 (UTC)
I disagree that it should be renamed 'market research'. If you read the article you will see that it is about marketing research. I only mentioned 'market research' in the second paragraph to provide context. There are other articles that are much closer to 'market research' than this one. mydogategodshat 03:26, 11 July 2005 (UTC)
But market reasearch redirects here, and as the broader term it should be the title. This problem could also be solved by giving market research its own article. - SimonP 13:57, July 11, 2005 (UTC)
Market research would be better redirected to Industry or market research. mydogategodshat 05:16, 15 July 2005 (UTC)
I'm not sure it really matters. In the business world, the terms are interchanged all the time. The methodologies used can be the same! Ad testing or market sizing, typically both are done with a quantitative study by the same people. dylan555 9:55, August 4 2005
Yes they tend to get interchanged in practice, but I don't think we should do the same.ullu ka pathamydogategodshat 03:39, 5 August 2005 (UTC)
Hate to split hairs here, but practice is the place where market or marketing research lives and breathes. They are interchanged in practice because they really do mean the same thing. This is a really good overview that is usable and educational. Either term is correct and equal here Bhenchod.

I believe that most professionals in the field would come out on the side of calling this profession "marketing research." The Webster definition is uninformed. A more informed definition is that Marketing Research is research done in the field of marketing. Market Research is research done on markets which might include the stock market, the options market, the cereal market, etc. Marketing research conducted in the field of marketing might start off by doing a "market study" but only as a first step to understand the marketing process. "Marketing Research" therefore is more inclusive of what the field does, "Market Research" is more ambiguous.

At this point, I'm glad to see that there are separate entries for "marketing research" and "market research". A couple of things: (1) The Webster's definition reflects perfectly the grammatical structure. Research markets, and you're conducting market research. Research marketing, and you're conducting marketing research. (2) If we wanted to distinguish research into different types of markets, the most straightforward (and grammatically-coherent) way would be to have separate entries for "market research (marketing)", "market research (stocks)", "market research (options)", etc.Rcauvin 16:05, 11 November 2006 (UTC)
The industry itself talks about Market Research - please have a look at Market Research Society MRS at http://www.mrs.org.uk/ or International Journal of Market Research http://www.ijmr.com/ as examples. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 217.196.248.97 (talk) 09:34, 4 May 2007 (UTC).
  • This is also an AE/BE difference - "marketing research" is a rare term in British English Johnbod 03:59, 1 December 2007 (UTC)

Market research and marketing research are quite different things - and there is a separate market research article - yet the intro to this article says they are the same! Yet the article is mostly about marketing research, rather than the wider market research. This is very confusing. Ben Finn (talk) 23:13, 3 January 2009 (UTC)

Market and Marketing Research are different terms and both should have different purpose. So, what is written in Market research page: "Once that research is completed, it can be used to determine how to market your product." is wrong, since it should be one of Marketing purpose. Market research should be more for study or data collecting purpose rather than business purpose. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 124.195.55.4 (talk) 04:40, 22 June 2009 (UTC)

Agree, I'm, for example, marketing analyst, my speciality is to accompany marketing campeigns and actions, but it has nothing to do with market research. (Natalie) —Preceding unsigned comment added by 62.219.121.29 (talk) 08:31, 1 June 2009 (UTC)


As a 17-year veteran of market research and marketing research, I wouldn't call myself an "expert", but I believe I have successfully remedied this conundrum by standardizing the introductory (lede) paragraph for both the article about Marketing research and about Market research. Accordingly, I will now remove the "discuss" note from the article here. -- Thekohser 22:29, 6 September 2009 (UTC)

Attributing Founding of Market Research to AC Nielsen>[edit]

I had always though that the normal attribution was to George (?)Gallup - some story about rummaging around in dustbins to find evidence of upmarket people eating Campbells soup...?

I can't recall the reference on this at present, but I'm sure I could find it.

What led you to the AC Nielsen reference?

Also, not to re-raise the great Marketing v Market Research debate, I think it tends to be marketing research in the US and market research in most other places.

Nielsen was four years older, and founded his market research firm while Gallup was still an undergraduate student. On the other hand few ideas are originated by a single person, and I see no reason not to share credit among all those who significantly influenced the field. --Blainster 23:56, 14 January 2006 (UTC)

Most professionals believe that Charles Coolidge Parlin, the first marketing research director of the Saturday Evening Post was likely the first person to create a marketing research department and interview people about their attitudes and opinions. This was in the first decade of the 1900's. [User Harryh4026]

market re - search.[edit]

i think the market research again go through the market situation to find somthing new to avoid the current problem or to avoid any future risk or to get more ways to get more benifets from the business or task.

international marketing factor —Preceding unsigned comment added by 122.168.246.167 (talk) 13:01, 24 July 2009 (UTC)