Talk:Marquisate of Samaranch

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The page on Spanish nobility states that "While noble titles historically have followed the rule of male-preference primogeniture, a Spanish law came into effect on October 30, 2006, after approval by both houses of the Cortes, establishing the inheritance of hereditary noble titles by the firstborn regardless of gender. The law is retroactive to July 27, 2005.[1]"

This suggests to me that the Marquessate of Sameranch, due to having been created before 2005, is untouched by this change and descends in the male line only. Cyan22 (talk) 10:47, 10 April 2013 (UTC)

That isn't how the new law is being applied. "Retroactive" here means that if the titleholder died or resigned the title between the date of passage of the law on 30 October 2006 and 27 July 2005, the law still applies to transmission of that title to the next heir. Since 99% of Spanish titles were created before 2005, the law would be meaningless if it only applied to new titles. Several lawsuits have been filed by female relatives of titleholders to claim a title that was assumed by a male family member post-July 2005. Those who have held Spanish titles of nobility or grandezas prior to 27 July 2005, even if they have a sister or other female relative closer in kinship to the previous titleholder, are allowed to keep them. But from that date forward, gender is irrelevant in determining the heir to a title -- only degree of kinship to the previous titleholder and seniority of birth apply. FactStraight (talk) 21:28, 10 April 2013 (UTC)