Talk:Mashgiach

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"Mashgiach" has two uses that I am aware of: (1) a person who supervises the kashrut of a commercial esablishment, and (2) a person who supervises the students of a yeshiva. Neither of these would get redirected to "Rosh Yeshiva". The mashgiach of a yeshiva might be the same person as the Rosh Yeshiva, but that is rarely the case. I therefore plan to delete this redirection page, and modify the places which link to it. I'm not sure how long I should wait for comments and reactions, and I will now research Wikipedia's policies and suggestions in that area. --Keeves 02:07, 27 Apr 2005 (UTC)

I updated the page to reflect the definion as you subscribed it. The distinction between "Mashgiach" and "Rosh Yeshiva" is wiki-worthy information. - Pioneer-12 06:31, 27 Apr 2005 (UTC)
  • A Mashgiach (for the supervision of the Kashrut i.e. "fitnes" according to Jewish law) of foods, is NOT a Mashgiach ruchani. A Mashgiach ruchani ("spiritual supervisor/guide") works in an Orthodox yeshiva in an educational capacity. A Rosh yeshiva is 99% of the time NOT the Masgiach ruchani. The Rosh yeshiva is the head of the yeshiva and is usually its chief expert and teacher of Talmud. The job of the Mashgiach ruchani is to teach mussar, i.e. Jewish ethics. IZAK 04:34, 2 December 2005 (UTC)

Is it really proper to add this article to the "Legal occupations" category? Look at what else is there. It is really more about the civil court system than any religious law. If this really deserves to be there, then Rabbi, Posek, and Imam should certainly be there. But my vote is to remove it. --Keeves 12:40, 17 May 2006 (UTC)

Keeves ... Since the time of your post, I've added more Christian, Jewish and Muslim religious law references to the category Legal occupations. Take a look. Yes, Posek is there. (However, Rabbi and Imam, while they give religious law guidance to their flock, are too generalist in my view, i.e., not as specialized in their juristic functions as some of the various juristic-specific Christian, Jewish and Muslim namespaces that I did decide to add to the category.) One reasons why I thought it was a good idea to add religious law namespaces to that category is that because, in some countries, religious law functions as the law of the country or forms a large part of the law of the country. --Aquarius Rising 01:28, 18 May 2006 (UTC)

Wow. I wrote the original article for "Mashgiach" last year. I haven't checked it in a while. Someone (or multiple someones) has done wonderful editing and reformatting. Yasher koach! Chezsruli 05:01, 25 February 2007 (UTC)