Talk:Matriarchy

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Main introductory line and description[edit]

Edited to reflect equal introduction to the Patriarchy page because all in all the terms all encompassing-ly reflect opposite of each other and mean nothing more

(This post was by an editor at IP address 104.220.133.11 (talk). Nick Levinson (talk) 03:43, 18 February 2016 (UTC))

For future reference, while it is often convenient to think of terms such as these as parallel, often they are only superficially parallel, because the underlying sources differ enough to make them not so. In this case, the editing was pretty much okay, not because of parallelism but because of general consistency with the body, where the sourcing appears. Nick Levinson (talk) 03:43, 18 February 2016 (UTC)

Removed the parenthetical "(linguistically, it is not a parallel term)". However hypothetical or real matriarchy would or did operate, the words "matriarchy" and "patriarchy" are 100% parallel _linguistically_ just like "mother" and "father"... — Preceding unsigned comment added by 62.23.231.120 (talk) 11:52, 15 July 2017 (UTC)

Matriarchy in the animal kingdom[edit]

Matriarchy in the animal kingdom.' --Trepuptechnologies (talk) 06:17, 8 March 2017 (UTC) Bees - The social structure of a bee hive is that of a matriarchal family headed by a queen. The queen has a potential life span of three years and during this time may continually lay eggs thereby establishing and maintaining a total colony population of approximately twenty five thousand bees. Almost 95% of the queens offspring are what are referred to as worker bees, with the remaining 5% developing into drones.[1]

Elephants - Elephants form deep family bonds and live in tight matriarchal family groups of related females called a herd. The herd is led by the oldest and often largest female in the herd, called a matriarch. Herds consist of 8-100 individuals depending on terrain and family size. When a calf is born, it is raised and protected by the whole matriarchal herd. [2]

Bonobo Apes - Pioneering primate researcher Amy Parish has spent more than a decade studying bonobos. Parish’s groundbreaking work shows how bonobos live in a society surprisingly dominated by females, who use gal-pal alliances to exert power. And that puts a revolutionary twist on long-held beliefs about what's "natural" in terms of sex roles and female friendships-not just for these apes but for their close genetic cousins: us (humans). Unrelated bonobo females seemed to prefer each other's company to males. They lolled about grooming each other, shared food, kissed and hugged, and even rubbed genitals to cement special friendships- the latter behavior getting most of the ink when bonobos first came to public attention. As a group, bonobo guys seemed out of the loop, a marked contrast to male-dominated chimpanzee politics. In fact, bonobo females are fighters as well as lovers, although males in the wild can more easily escape serious injury by fleeing into the jungle. The females will even fight each other to protect their sons-ultimate mama's boys whose rank through life depends on their mothers. Many bonobo daughters leave their family group at adolescence, joining other colonies by currying favor with senior, older females.

While some critics still dismiss the bonobo matriarchy as a fluke or feminist delusion, Parish and others counter with theory and evidence that show how female bonding works to control individual males despite the males' slightly larger size. Unlike abused loner chimp females, it's likely that the bonobo gal gang prevents males from killing the babies of rival males (as other apes do) and allows females to choose their own mates and grab the best food. In the wild, females also hunt and distribute meat, once considered exclusively a male preserve. Excerpts from:[3]

Orcas (Killer Whales) - Killer whale pods are based on the lineage of the mother (mothers, daughters, and sons form groups); the whales live and travel with their mothers even after they are full-grown, forming strongly matriarchal whale societies. In addition to the mothers, various pod members (mainly adolescent females) perform most of the care for the calves. [4]

Lions - Lions are also the only cats that live in large, social groups called “prides.” A pride can have 3 to 30 lions and is made up of lionesses (mothers, sisters, and cousins), and their cubs, along with a few unrelated adult males. The pride has a close bond and is not likely to accept a stranger. The unrelated males stay a few months or a few years, but the older lionesses stay together for life. In dry areas with less food, prides are smaller, with two lionesses in charge. In habitats with more food and water, prides can have four to six adult lionesses. The lionesses work together to hunt and help rear the cubs. This allows them to get the most from their hard work, keeping them healthier and safer. Being smaller and lighter than males, lionesses are more agile and faster. During hunting, smaller females chase the prey toward the center of the hunting group. The larger and heavier lionesses ambush or capture the prey. Lionesses are versatile and can switch hunting jobs depending on which females are hunting that day and what kind of prey it is. [5]

I favor adding a section on animals, if sourced (it will be at least somewhat controversial). I haven't closely reviewed the above, which appears to need more work anyway, such as on formatting, but the concept is good. I would title it Matriarchy Among Nonhuman Animals and I would position it just before the section In Popular Culture. It's a good idea to cover this. Nick Levinson (talk) 00:54, 9 March 2017 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ "Bees".
  2. ^ "Elephant".
  3. ^ "Bonobo Apes".
  4. ^ "Orcas".
  5. ^ "Lions".

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edit of mid October 2017 edit and new presumption that can be checked[edit]

In the October 15 or 16, 2017, edit (citing both dates to allow time zone differences), two consecutive paragraphs were added, each ending with a citation. The citations say "Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1990, The Hebrew Goddess, 3rd ed., Raphael Patai, pp. 38-39" and "op. cit., pp. 96-111" (both without quotation marks). Both paragraphs have similar subjects and both refer in their main texts to Patai, and Patai is also cited in the first citation. The first citation appears to cite a book. While Amazon has a sample from the book, it's from the Kindle version and not a print version, so searching by page numbers is impossible. But Google Books has the paginated version. The second citation is to pages that correspond to the pages that form chapter IV. While I have no expertise on the chapter's subject, it appears to me that the chapter's first paragraph suggests that the second Wikipedia paragraph is based on that chapter. Therefore, I think the second citation is based on the first citation and not on something elsewhere in the article or anything subsequently deleted. (URLs were accessed Mar. 15–16, 2018.) Since the second citation uses "op. cit." and Wikipedia discourages using it, I am editing the second citation to more explicitly tie it to the first citation by adding the Patai work to the Bibliography and editing both citations to rely on the Bibliography. Nick Levinson (talk) 00:24, 18 March 2018 (UTC)

Emmanuel Todd, The Origins of Family Systems (2011)[edit]

Is a comprehensive treatise of demographic history largely devoted to the histories and geographical distribution of matrilineal and matrilocal societies, complete with the latest maps and all. Surprised to see no mention of this here. See also "A Convergence of Civilisations" by same author which has a whole chapter on South East Asian matriarchy (which includes a lot more than the Minangkabau...) and its relation with Buddhism and Islam. Would be good if editors used those sources :) --183.89.38.233 (talk) 17:27, 11 June 2019 (UTC)

What points would you want to see in the article?
- SquisherDa (talk) 18:03, 11 June 2019 (UTC)
Consider adding to the Matrilineality and Matrilocal residence articles, as well as to this article, whatever is in any reliable source and that is relevant. Note that this article does not cover what is in the other articles, as we prefer to minimize overlaps and rely on cross-linking instead. Feel free to edit all of these articles and others. Nick Levinson (talk) 20:17, 15 June 2019 (UTC)