Talk:Mesosphere

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Important Books[edit]

The following are important books on the mesosphere:

  • wilfried schröder, developmental phases of noctilucent cloud research, berlin, akademie verlag, 1976-
  • michael gadsden and wilfried schröder, noctilucent clouds, heidelberg, springer 1989
  • wilfried schröder, noctilucent clouds, bremen, science edition, 1998

217.86.155.149 07:49, Apr 29 2002 (UTC)

Coldest Temperature[edit]

I noticed that the "coldest temperature" is listed as 200 K, but in fact the temperature in the summer mesopause gets much colder, down to about 100 K. The temperature at the summer mesopause is thought to be a sensitive indicator of global change, and greater thermal energy in the lower atmosphere. -90 c — Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.118.28.146 (talk) 01:14, 7 April 2013 (UTC)

Temperature Range[edit]

Does anyone know what the temperature RANGE of the mesosphere is in Celsius?

The temperature in the mesosphere is -100C

English system[edit]

Is 80-90 km about 50 miles? Which is closer to 50? Tailsfan2 (talk) 00:33, 14 February 2008 (UTC)

50 miles = 80.467 kilometers. (1 mile = 1.609344 kilometers) Therefore, 80 kilometers better represents 50 miles. DAK4Blizzard (talk) 02:19, 4 June 2009 (UTC)

Stopping Meteors[edit]

How does the mesosphere stop meteors? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.244.20.149 (talk) 23:14, 8 May 2008 (UTC)

The friction forces rise with the density of air. So the meteorites melt due frictional heating and desintegrate into smaller parts and atoms and molecules. These small particles are much slower, than a massive particle, and more or less float. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 134.102.186.40 (talk) 11:28, 11 February 2013 (UTC)

Particles in Mesosphere[edit]

Can anyone tell me what particles are in abundance at this layer of the earths atmosphere? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Dankelly83 (talkcontribs) 16:10, 22 January 2009 (UTC)

Where in the Atmosphere Does the Sky Turn Black?[edit]

Does anyone know at what altitude the sky turns from blue to black? Then again, the altitude probably varies with latitude (because the altitude of the layers of the atmosphere vary with latitude), so perhaps a better question is in what layer of the atmosphere does the sky turn from blue to black? DAK4Blizzard (talk) 23:54, 23 May 2009 (UTC)

In 2004, a pilot set an altitude record for a private spaceship. He reached a maximum altitude of 212,000 feet (64.62 km), which is in the mesosphere. The sky turned from blue to black for him somewhere during his flight (the article fails to specify where). He took off from the Mojave Desert, so he was presumably in a mid-latitude area of the atmosphere.[1] From experience of flying up to 40,000 feet in mid-latitudes, I know the sky is obviously still blue in the lower part of the stratosphere. Therefore, it seems that the sky turns from blue to black somewhere between the lower stratosphere (40,000 feet) and middle mesosphere (212,000 feet). So now the question is, where in that range does the sky turn from blue to black? DAK4Blizzard (talk) 00:10, 24 May 2009 (UTC)
I'll answer my own question from a year ago. The sky turns black at around 60,000 feet (~11.5 miles or ~18.5 km) altitude, which is in the lower to middle stratosphere. This makes sense, because there really isn't much air (which causes the sky to appear blue) above where commercial planes fly at ~35,000 feet. (See the video, Ride on a U2 spy plane and this website.) DAK4Blizzard (talk) 22:32, 20 May 2010 (UTC)
Confirmed. It's about 60k feet. I searched all over the net for an answer to this question and was faced with a lot of unhelpful know-it-alls who failed to answer the question. At 60,000 feet 99% of the atmosphere is below you...and the sky is black. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 209.193.21.1 (talk) 05:31, 8 July 2012 (UTC)

1. Black is not a color. 2. The blue color of the sky comes from the frequency dependence f^4 in the dominant scattering process (Rayleigh-scattering). When the air gets thinner, there is less scattered solar radiation, therefore the the sky becomes darker. This of course also depends on the day/night conditions as well as the angle the light is scattered into your field of view. Your question is maybe, at which altitude Rayleigh scattering gets that low, that you would consider it as black, which is dependant of the individual properties of your eyes, e.g. the treshold you set for no signal. There is no sharp transition from blue to black. The sky can actually have many other different color, like red and green lights from oxygen transitions in the aurora, polar light, etc.. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 134.102.186.40 (talk) 11:20, 11 February 2013 (UTC)

"the coldest naturally occurring place on Earth"[edit]

I'm no scientist, but isn't this statement erroneous, given that the mesosphere isn't "on Earth"? --Dweller (talk) 15:48, 8 February 2013 (UTC)

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