Talk:Mexicans

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Typos and Grammar[edit]

  • Small typo in the Ethnicity section, Today subsection, 5th paragraph: "lat" instead of "late."
  • Also, under Languages, 3rd paragraph: reads "Mexico's National Commission for the Development of Indigenous Peoples recognizes the language of the Kickapoo who immigrated from the United States," probably should ready "Mexico's National Commission for the Development of Indigenous Peoples recognizes the language of the Kickapoo that immigrated from the United States."
  • Section Population Genetics, 4th paragraph, content states a study was conducted in 6 cities, but states are listed instead.

Wikifof (talk) 19:04, 10 May 2013 (UTC)

Genetics of Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Dominican, Colombians and Ecuadorians[edit]

The genetics that they did were not in Latin America like in the genetic section says, the genetic studies were done in the Tri-state in New York, the mexicans who live in New York doesnt represent the mexicans as a whole since the ones who live in New York are mexicans from Puebla who come from indigenous communities, therefore it would be good to write that down. I think its important to show what natives mexicans from New York get on their genetic testing, since they dont have a place in the genetic section, only mestizos testing

Here is the article http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/05/100503161421.htm

here is also another genetic testing done on mexicans from Mexico Genetic admixture in three Mexican Mestizo populations based on D1S80 and HLA-DQA1 loci. Cerda-Flores RM, Villalobos-Torres MC, Barrera-Saldana HA, Cortes-Prieto LM, Barajas LO, Rivas F, Carracedo A, Zhong Y, Barton SA, Chakraborty R. Departamento de Genetica de Poblaciones, Centro de Investigacion Biomedica del Noreste (CIBIN), Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

This study compares genetic polymorphisms at the D1S80 and HLA-DQA1 loci in three Mexican Mestizo populations from three large states (Nuevo Leon, Jalisco, and the Federal District). Allele frequency distributions are relatively homogenous in the three samples; only the Federal District population shows minor differences of the HLA-DQA1 allele frequencies compared with the other two. In terms of genetic composition, these Mestizo populations show evidence of admixture with predominantly Spanish-European (50-60%) and Amerindian (37-49%) contributions; the African contribution (1-3%) is minor. Together with the observation that in Nuevo Leon, the admixture estimates based on D1S80 and HLA-DQA1, are virtually the same as those reported earlier from blood group loci, suggests that DNA markers, such as D1S80 and HLA-DQA1 are useful for examining genetic homogeneity/heterogeneity across Mestizo populations of Mexico. The inverse relationship of the proportion of gene diversity due to population differences (Gst) to within population gene diversity (Hs) is also consistent with theoretical predictions, supporting the use of these markers for population genetics studies.

Genetic structure of the populations migrating from San Luis Potosi and Zacatecas to Nuevo Leon in Mexico. Cerda-Flores RM, Kshatriya GK, Barton SA, Leal-Garza CH, Garza-Chapa R, Schull WJ, Chakraborty R. Subjefatura de Investigacion Cientifica, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Nuevo Leon, Mexico.

The Mexicans residing in the Monterrey metropolitan area in Nuevo Leon, Mexico, were grouped by generation and birthplace [Monterrey Metropolitan Area (MMA), San Luis Potosi (SLP), and Zacatecas (ZAC)] of the four grandparents to determine the extent of genetic variation within this population and the genetic differences, if any, between the natives living in the MMA and the immigrant populations from SLP and ZAC. Nine genetic marker systems were analyzed. The genetic distance analysis indicates that SLP and ZAC are similar to the MMA, irrespective of birthplace and generation. Gene diversity analysis (GST) suggests that more than 96% of the total gene diversity (HT) can be attributed to individual variation within the population. The genetic admixture analysis suggests that the Mexicans of the MMA, SLP, and ZAC, stratified by birthplace and generation, have received a predominantly Spanish contribution (78.5%), followed by a Mexican Indian contribution (21.5%). Similarly, admixture analysis, conducted on the population of Nuevo Leon and stratified by generation, indicates a substantial contribution from the MMA (64.6%), followed by ZAC (22.1%) and SLP (13.3%). Finally, we demonstrate that there is no nonrandom association of alleles among the genetic marker systems (i.e., no evidence of gametic disequilibrium) despite the Mestizo origin of this population.

Genetic variation in Arizona Mexican Americans: estimation and interpretation of admixture proportions. Long JC, Williams RC, McAuley JE, Medis R, Partel R, Tregellas WM, South SF, Rea AE, McCormick SB, Iwaniec U. Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque 87131.

Mexican Americans are a numerous and fast growing ethnic population in the United States. Yet little is known about their genetic structure. Since they are a hybrid, it is of interest to identify their parental populations and to estimate the relative contributions of these groups. This information is relevant to historical, biomedical, and evolutionary concerns. New genetic typings on 730 Arizona Mexican Americans for the HLA-A, HLA-B, ABO, Rh, MNSs, Duffy, Kidd, and Kell loci are presented here and they are used to estimate ancestral contributions. We considered both a dihybrid model with Amerindians and Spaniards as proposed ancestors, and a trihybrid model with Amerindians, Spaniards, and Africans as proposed ancestors. A modified weighted least squares method that allows for linkage disequilibrium was used to estimate ancestral contributions for each model. The following admixture estimates were obtained: Amerindian, 0.29 +/- 0.04; Spaniard, 0.68 +/- 0.05; and African, 0.03 +/- 0.02. The interpretation of these results with respect to Amerindian and Spanish ancestry is straightforward. African ancestry is strongly supported by the presence of a marker of African descent, Fy, despite the fact that the standard error of the estimate is as large as the estimated admixture proportion. An evaluation of the sensitivity of these results to a number of variables is presented: 1) our choices of ancestral allele frequencies, 2) the possibility of selection at HLA and the blood groups, and 3) genetic drift in Mexican Americans.


Gene frequencies and admixture estimates in a Mexico City population. Lisker R, Perez-Briceno R, Granados J, Babinsky V, de Rubens J, Armendares S, Buentello L.

Five hundred and ten students of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico were tested to determine the distribution of ABO, MN, Rr-Hr blood groups, and serum haptoglobin, albumin, and Factor Bf types. Based on the results we found that the proportion of Indian and White genes are of 56.16 and 43.84%, respectively in the dihybrid model and 2.93, 56.22, and 40.85% for Blacks, Indians, and Whites in the trihybrid one. The present study reveals a higher proportion of Indian genes in the Mexico City population than estimated in previous publications. Reasons why the present results apply to a much larger group of Mexico City mestizos than the previous ones are given. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Dawson714 (talkcontribs) 00:20, 14 October 2011 (UTC)


^^The first article or study talks about Y-DNA haplogroup lineages, the study was not done on autosomal admixture — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.173.124.31 (talk) 00:35, 14 January 2014 (UTC)

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popular genetics[edit]

why not just delete this section of popular genetics if there is so mush dispute and diagreements with it? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Urjyurf (talkcontribs) 06:22, 19 December 2011 (UTC)

We dont just delete references material because we don't like it. The section is sourced with it clearly stating that there are different reports/papers/etc.. on the topic and is why its a bit confusing and contradictory. All that said how can we fix the material. What are the problems at hand? Moxy (talk) 07:25, 25 December 2011 (UTC)


Regarding the"Today column" it says there are considerable african and asian heritage in populations. Mexico is predominantly of indeginous and spanish heritage.In mexico it is very rare fot their to be african heritage beacuase heritage is defined as valued objects and qualities such as cultural traditions. There ore only a few regions that have minor african/asian heritage. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Maxy38 (talkcontribs) 05:01, 28 December 2011 (UTC)

The pop. has alout less than PARTIAL african ances/heritage, only 3% do (http://www.everyculture.com/Middle-America-Caribbean/African-Mexicans.html — Preceding unsigned comment added by Urjyurf (talkcontribs) 23:22, 13 January 2012 (UTC)
Could we get you to read up on the subject - Then edit the page using it as a ref perhaps?. Please read over Tony Nick Frudakis (2008). Molecular photofitting: predicting ancestry and phenotype using DNA. Elsevier. p. 347-350. . See also Moxy (talk) 09:04, 15 January 2012 (UTC)

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Population Genetics revisited[edit]

Hello people, many people here have confusions over the status of the racial admixture in Mexicans (on average). It seems that most of us are not informed as to what these percentages of racial admixture indicate. For example, in the study that found Mexicans to be ~64 European, that study was referring to the DNA Y chromosome which is only inherited from the father. It did not take into account the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) which is inherited only from the mother. Therefore, the study concluded that 64% of 50% of Mexicans' genes were European. In other words, we could say that 64% of 50% is 0.64 * 0.50 is 0.32, or 32%. The study established that Mexicans have at least 32% European admixture when both paternal and maternal genes are averaged. I believe most studies of Mexican mtDNA found it to be mostly Amerindian (>80%) therefore the study that is closest to reality is the study on the article that states that Mexicans are (on average) 55% Amerindian and 45% European (and African). I hope this clears it up and I might put into a citation for the mtDNA studies.--169.231.48.161 (talk) 06:48, 14 February 2014 (UTC)

I wouldn't venture to say that one study is closest to reality than other, consedering that inside the study you are talking about it's mentioned that the samples used "do not fully represent the genetic variability of European and Amerindian ancestral origin present in these Mestizos" [1]. And you can't attempt to calculate Autosomal genetic results doing a summatory of the results found on Y-dna and mtDNA studies, it doesn't works that way, these two things are very different. You can learn more about this reading the Genealogical DNA test article here on wikipedia. Kn1467 (talk) 01:36, 16 February 2014 (UTC)

Mexican American population VS Mexican immigrants[edit]

What exactly is this article supposed to cover? Is it the people of Mexico as a "nationality" or as an "ethic group"? From what I can gather, it's the former. Why then, does the article include the total number of people of Mexican descent living in the United States? A large portion of whom don't consider themselves Mexican, rather Mexican American. Heck, right at the beginning it says that it is the populace of Mexico and those that "identify with the Mexican cultural and/or national identity." There is also the problem that the numbers given for other countries (with the exception of Canada, which should also be changed) are over the immigrant population. Both problems can be solved by including the immigrant population of about 13 million instead of the 34 million+ Mexican Americans. If necessary, a hatnote or some other option to differentiate should be included to direct people to the entire Mexican American population. Xochiztli (talk) 12:44, 2 November 2014 (UTC)

Nezahualcoyotl, a Mexican?[edit]

On the section displaying pictures of Mexicans there is a picture of Nezahualcoyotl, who was a leader of the Texcoco city state. It would seem incorrect to classify him as a Mexican given that during his time the Mexican nationality was not even defined, the Mexican nation did not even exist. Mexico is a melting pot of the European & Indigenous cultures that resulted from the conquest and it was not until the late XIX century that a true Mexican sense of identity was created. The analogy would be displaying the picture of Julius Caesar in the `Italian People´ page. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 104.35.180.235 (talk) 03:31, 27 November 2014 (UTC)

Chespirito[edit]

It's sad that there is no image at commons for Chespirito who is by far a legendary Mexican cultural icon. Is there a way to add a picture of him. There's a statue of El Chavo on commons and some other language Wikipedia are using it as an image for Chespirito. Maybe, with your consent, we can use it. Or maybe, if appropriate, I can upload a non-free file to the Wiki of Chespirito. Just a suggestion. I really feel that there needs to be something of Chespirito. --TDKR Chicago 101 (talk) 22:17, 4 January 2015 (UTC)

Move discussion in progress[edit]

There is a move discussion in progress on Talk:Belizean people which affects this page. Please participate on that page and not in this talk page section. Thank you. —RMCD bot 13:00, 2 April 2015 (UTC)