Talk:Microbicides for sexually transmitted diseases

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question[edit]

I have a couple questions... How is Microbicide put into the body? injection? This is in the article as lubes, films, vaginal rings etc Ericglare (talk) 11:14, 15 March 2014 (UTC) How does it work? This too is already there.Ericglare (talk) 11:14, 15 March 2014 (UTC) Is it just for sexual diseases like HIV?—Preceding unsigned comment added by an unknown user on 2005

Microbicides work in different ways, depending on the product. Some directly kill bacteria, others nuetralize the diseases by tearing off their coatings, and others simply make the vagina inhospitable to any disease. The way they could be applied could be the same ways spermicides currently are ie. suppositories, creams, gels, films, foams, and through various applicator type schemes. They also could be used to replace traditional spermicides in diaphragms and cervical caps. SiberioS 02:59, 16 August 2005 (UTC)

The article needs a survey regularly of what is hypothetical and what has some evidence, eg "Thus, carrageenan and other microbicides of its class act as decoy receptors for viral binding." Yes they were designed as decoys but this class so far hasn't worked like that, so do they actually enhance mucosal membrane transfer, ie are a carrier, rather than a decoy away from epithelial binding and infection. Skepticism needs to be maintained.Ericglare (talk) 11:14, 15 March 2014 (UTC)

This is one article that needs to update from the rather old (for UK, Australia and much of Europe) STD to STI where T is preferably transmissible rather than transmitted. Microbicides will be important for both microbes where transmission is obligatory (eg gonorrhea) as well as those situations like bacterial vaginosis which are an issue with and without transmission being the cause [1]. The latter are better describes as 'transmissible' rather than transmitted. Similarly, the strategy is firstly about preventing infection (STI) rather than disease (STD). Chlamydia is a good example where the majority of people, men much more so, will not progress to disease and will naturally clear the infection. This info is in virtually every safer web site as well as many high school curriculums.Ericglare (talk) 11:14, 15 March 2014 (UTC)

Men will benefit too[edit]

Two sentences in the first paragraph discussing the benefit of microbicides for sexually disempowered women seems sufficient. Too much additional focus on the various ways that men sexually oppress women might be redundant and might distract readers from the important concept that effective topical microbicides would be of great benefit to men as well. Cheating husbands don't deserve to be infected with HIV, herpes or genital warts any more than their wives do. Also note that HIV is roughly 50:50 men:women worldwide [1], so text implying that women are at greater overall "risk" is misleading. Also glaringly absent is the concept that gay men would benefit from effective topical microbicides. It seems imbalanced to have six sentences about the benefits for disempowered women and zero sentences about benefits for men.

Yes the prevalence of HIV infection worldwide is roughly 50:50 but it is completely misleading to then assume that risk is 50:50 for men and women. There are many factors but the risk for vaginal sex is roughly double for women and for anal sex it is 12-20 times higher than for men and this doesn't take into account choice. This makes commonsense if you consider volume and time of exposure to infected body fluid of partner and the area of delicate membrane exposed and the degree that the membrane gets roughed up by sex≤http://www.aidsmap.com/HIV-transmission/page/1327376/≥. So it would seem that men take more risks and also prevent their female partners from avoiding risk. A typical risky scenario common to many poor countries is men going away to work and bringing HIV and other STI home to their partners. In addition most current strategies for the use of microbicides rely on application to the female not the male. Consequently almost all trials of microbicide acceptability studies and of potential candidates have targeted women and anally receptive men who have sex with men rather than their insertive partners. I do agree that there needs to be a paragraph on who will use microbicides and how the dynamic might work or not to reduce risk of STI transmission.Ericglare (talk) 12:44, 15 March 2014 (UTC)

On a related note, I'm trying to think of a way to include a mention of the dreadful "dry sex" issue in sub-Saharan Africa (see [2]. It could pose an enormous barrier to implementation of topical microbicide programs. Might require breaking the article into sections. Retroid 15:04, 16 August 2006 (UTC)

Yes, please, by all means. (I was previously unaware of the "dry sex" phenomenon.) But why not link to the existing article? Iskunk 00:22, 18 August 2006 (UTC)

Article focuses too much on STD prevention?[edit]

I understand that microbicides present great hope for the elimination/reduction of STDs when condom use is not acceptable/possible. However, to read this article, one would get the impression that the primary function of microbicides is of a sexual nature. The article only alludes to the fact that microbicides have any role in general medicine (surgery preparation, etc). I feel that the discussion of the sexual issues is important, but should not constitute almost the entirety of this article. I am not suggesting that the issues stated be removed but rather that an effort be made to expand on the other information related to microbicides, such as a list of known agents (povidone-iodine, etc.) or the history of their use in the medical field, and perhaps relocate the STD-microbicide discussion to one subheading or to aseparate, linked article.

Outside of the discussion related specifically to possible STD inhibition properties, this article provides very little general information on microbicides; it focuses on just one area of a broad subject.

128.194.63.22 21:59, 24 January 2007 (UTC)bdabbs

Maybe this was before an article name change? See MicrobicideOmegatron 02:41, 12 March 2008 (UTC)

Sources requested, please[edit]

Does anyone know of a primary medical textbook or source which outlines the field of microbicides for sexually transmitted diseases? Otherwise, what key overviews exist of this topic? Blue Rasberry (talk) 17:03, 17 November 2011 (UTC)

drug infobox[edit]

the drug infobox seems to be specific to "Tenofovir", including the image. Tenofovir is only one class of microbicide, correct? Is there a less-specific infobox and image that can be used for this? Doniasis (talk) 11:37, 12 December 2011 (UTC)

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Changes to Mechanisms of Action - Nanosonic Dendrimers[edit]

Given this entry discusses a lot about nanosonic dendrimers, antimicronbial agent VivaGel may be relevant. More details with references below:

VivaGel is an antimicrobial agent manufactured by Australian pharmceutical company Starpharma. The active ingredient is a nanoscale dendrimeric molecule (which binds to viruses and prevents them from affecting an organisms's cells. The US National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have awarded grants totaling $25.7 million for VivaGel's development and testing. VivaGel is currently approved for marketing in the European Union for the topical treatment and rapid belief of Bacterial Vaginosis and is currently applied to condoms as an antiviral lubricant[2]. VivaGel condoms have Australian and European regulatory approval[3].

It is also hoped that microbicides will block the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, such as those caused by certain human papillomaviruses (HPV) and herpes simplex viruses (HSV). Studies have shown that the VivaGel has been proven in laboratory studies only, to inactivate HIV, HSV and HPV[4]. It is still unknown what the results mean for women who would use the product in real-life settings; for example, the effect of seual intercourse (or semen) on the gel (which often affects the protective properties of a drug) is known. The CAPRISA 004 trial demonstrated that topical tenofovir gel provided 51% protection against HSV-2[5].

WE Buchan (talk) 01:29, 26 September 2016 (UTC)

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  1. ^ http://www.mshc.org.au/Portals/_default/uploads/fact_sheets/Bacterial_Vaginosis_(BV)_a4.pdf
  2. ^ "Starpharma wins EU approval for VivaGel". Sydney Morning Herald. 24 September 2015. Retrieved 26 September 2016. 
  3. ^ Wheate, Nial. "Antiviral condoms will help protect Australian Olympians from STIs – here's how". The Conversation. Retrieved 26 September 2016. 
  4. ^ Borreli, Lizette (21 July 2014). "This HIV-Killing Condom May Save Your Life". www.medicaldaily.com. Retrieved 26 September 2016. 
  5. ^ "Research: CAPRISA 004". clinicaltrials.gov. Retrieved October 2010.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)