Talk:Military cadence

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Does the Navy really use cadence?[edit]

Just curious here, but while going through bootcamp in 2001, I don't remember any cadence really being used. Most recruit divisions were marched along with the AROC singing various melodic versions of "1,2,3,4." I know it might sound strange to non-Navy folk, but those who are/were in recently might know what I'm talking about. Would these be considered cadence, as their was no call/repeat taking place? --Pinkyviolence (talk) 11:46, 27 January 2009 (UTC)

Editorial placed directly in the article[edit]

The following editorial was placed directly in the article by 75.76.114.15. I have removed it and copied it here:

The reference to an M240 machine gun raises serious questions about the accuracy of this cadence. The M240 was introduced long after the Vietnam war. An accurate cadence would have used an M60 machine gun. Because of this obvious discrepancy, it is more likely that this was not a real cadence, but was 'invented' by an anti-war activist trying to illustrate, long after the fact, how horrible soldiers in Vietnam really were.

(This editorial has no basis because the article does not state that the cadence was used during the Vietnam war. The cadence may also have changed based on the historical period during which it is recited. The article does include references substantiating that it has been used by U.S. military forces).Astuteoak (talk) 03:31, 11 October 2008 (UTC)

Uhh... the article says, "The following verses are from "Napalm Sticks to Kids." One of the most well known cadences of Vietnam, its use by the U.S. military has created controversy about the theme." It then proceeds to quote an obviously anachronistic verse (the M60 was Vietnam, the M240 is today). The footnote for that section comes from, "The Lonely Soldier: The Private War of Women Serving In Iraq", which doesn't sound like it has anything to do with expertise on well known cadences of Vietnam, but http://sniff.numachi.com/pages/tiNAPALM.html has feasible lyrics. I challenge you to find a reference that actually uses that verse. This passage sounds completely unprofessional, much like saying, "The following verses are from 'LOLCatz', one of the well known cadences of the Civil War." —Preceding unsigned comment added by 155.215.21.2 (talk) 16:38, 24 September 2010 (UTC)

Examples[edit]

There are now eight calls included in the article. Please think twice about including any more. It would be nice to have an example that is clearly from outside the US, for example. --Tysto 20:59, 4 February 2006 (UTC) Honestly, the only country that matters is the U.S. Secondly, the U.S. has the strongest military by far.

I made a section minor detailing the friendly competition between the different divisions of the United States Military. I intend to work on this page in the coming days. Let me know your thoughts on this minor section as of July 7 2006.

--Theadversary 02:20, 26 October 2006 (UTC) For goodness sakes folks...I fixed the C-130 cadence. It is "jump right out and count to four" not "jump right out on the count of four". Every airborne troop in the world knows you count to four AFTER you jump out, not before. If you tried to stand in the door and count to four you'd get a boot in your behind from the jumpmaster. Only non-airborne personnel called that cadence like that and if they did so around me, they got corrected on the spot.

Create Individual Cadence Articles?[edit]

I hope to create individual cadence articles. I have just created Napalm sticks to kids. I am going to add a list of cadences to the article and create "dead" links to encourage people working on individual cadence articles. How does this sound? serendipitousstl (email) 20:54, 7 January 2007 (UTC)

I'd recommend only making individual cadence articles for those cadences which are particularly noteworthy, due to being controversial, historically important, prominently appearing in a film, etc. Otherwise we'd end up with a bunch of stub pages that don't really add anything...I think a good metric would be: "Are there any sources that refer to this cadence that aren't just compilations of cadences?" I think Napalm sticks to kids clearly passes that metric, but there are a bunch of other good and/or interesting cadences which are not "notable" enough to warrant their own articles. Luke (talk) 05:33, 23 September 2010 (UTC)

Rename[edit]

  • cadence is the more common term in the us, not jody [unsigned user]
  • Google suggests that military cadence is vastly more common than jody call or cadence call. --Tysto 09:55, 6 January 2006 (UTC)
    • No objection from me. I suspect that cadence generally is the most common term, but cadence is a disambiguation page. "Jody call" means this precisely, which is why the page was created here. Smerdis of Tlön 12:57, 6 January 2006 (UTC)
      • I boldly went ahead and moved the page to military cadence; that makes it unambiguous what the page is about, what the context is, and is not US-specific. Smerdis of Tlön 15:11, 6 January 2006 (UTC)
        • Good; cadence is more familiar to this American; I suspect jody call is quite recent slang. Septentrionalis 00:26, 8 January 2006 (UTC)
          • I agree - military cadence is more proper H2O 23:03, 2 February 2006 (UTC)

Cadenza (military)[edit]

We also have this article. I suggest that it be merged here. This article also suggests, though, that military cadenzas are "forbidden in many countries." I know even less about this, and wonder what might be intended here. Smerdis of Tlön 06:17, 8 January 2006 (UTC)

Extended references on Cadences?[edit]

Is there any reference of candences used in the Middle Ages or even during the Roman era? Also would like to know how the military cadences are in other countries. I've noticed in the film "The New World", the colonists during a march into battle, were shouting "Saint George!" as their cadence...

WikiProject Military history/Assessment/Tag & Assess 2008[edit]

Article reassessed and graded as start class. --dashiellx (talk) 19:00, 23 May 2008 (UTC)

Possibly worth mentioning[edit]

The parody in The Simpsons episode Sweet Seymour Skinner's Baadasssss Song - [1]

"I don't know but I've been told / the Parthenon is mighty old".

that alludes to an obscene version in Full Metal Jacket. Gordonofcartoon (talk) 12:36, 23 June 2008 (UTC)

Old School[edit]

Has anyone out there heard a cadence called "Old School"? I heard it at BCT and not scince. It was a really cool cadence but I can't remember it. jamie.lynn.powell@us.army.mil —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.88.247.42 (talk) 16:19, 19 August 2008 (UTC)

Removed section

I removed a section that cited sources from geocities and progressive newspapers in order to make a politically motivated attempt to discredit the military. Please see wikipedia's section on credible sources before adding to articles. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 146.151.18.236 (talk) 18:09, 23 September 2008 (UTC)

"Controversial themes section"[edit]

Someone keeps adding this section and citing sources from a progressive newspaper. It has not been verified by an military sources and is in fact not a real cadence used by any branch.

See wikipedia's section on credible sources before posting this again. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 146.151.18.236 (talk) 23:22, 15 October 2008 (UTC)

Wikipedia articles are written by civilian editors - they do not need to be written by military personnel. The content in this section does have credible citations including the video documentary "Ground Truth", and another citation is a military veteran. They look OK. Please check the citations. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 4.152.213.205 (talk) 00:58, 16 October 2008 (UTC)

They don't have to be edited by military sources but objectionable material and non-verifiable sources claiming absurb things shall be removed. The content that was removed claimed that a common cadence involved soldiers mowing down kids with machine guns and cited geocites and a progressive newspaper. Geocities is not a trustworthy site and can be written by anybody while a progressive newspaper is cleary NPOV. See wikipedia guidelines before editing/reverting articles. It should remain as. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Tonykovar (talkcontribs) 02:18, 16 October 2008 (UTC)

Please check the citations 6 and 8: http://www.charleseanderson.com/dejavu.html AMcDermot (talk) 03:08, 16 October 2008 (UTC)

There's an unexplained NPOV tag just added -- could the person who put it there explain what seems to be POV? DavidOaks (talk) 22:29, 29 June 2009 (UTC)

article importance/ another use of the word cadence[edit]

There a large electronic design software house that uses the same name. In fact they come up first on a google search! http://www.cadence.com/us/pages/default.aspx I dont know how to split this page, so I wont edit it but the company IMHO is big enough to justify an entry, certainly any chip designer had heard of cadence, but not heard of the songs. A large percentage of all silicon chips are/were designed using their software. 86.32.15.20 (talk) 13:31, 16 March 2009 (UTC)

The Cadence For Firefighters is Incorrectly Labeled, I Think[edit]

I heard that cadence all the time when I was in the Marine Corps, which doesn't mean it didn't come from some Fire Department, but it's unlikely because:

(1) "PT" is a term used almost exclusively by the Marines; and

(2) "side-straddle hops" is used only by Marines to refer to what everyone else calls "jumping jacks."

So I'm editing it as a Fire Department / Marine Corps Cadence. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Vexdan (talkcontribs) 20:52, 1 April 2010 (UTC)

Great if you can get a ref. But as I said in my edit summary, I know personally that this one is used by the azrmy, and "P.T." is used by our local Army ROTC -- don't know about the "hops" terminology, though...DavidOaks (talk) 21:56, 1 April 2010 (UTC)
The U.S. "Azrmy" uses those terms almost without exception. See FM 21-20 (now FM 3-22.20). —Preceding unsigned comment added by 155.215.21.2 (talk) 16:43, 24 September 2010 (UTC)

Non American military cadence[edit]

Is anyone aware of any examples of songs as military cadence outside the USA? Although musical instruments for military cadence is widespread, the use of a work song for this purpose seems to be purely American.JohnC (talk) 19:57, 22 June 2010 (UTC)

Too long[edit]

The examples of actual cadences are welcome, encyclopedic, and would likely be useful to readers. But, they should be discussed in summary style here and linked to a "List of xxx cadences" article or articles. Those articles would have to be created, but it's not hard. There could be one for US Army running cadences, US Marine quick-time cadences, x country military cadences, etc.
That will allow many more cadences to be actually listed, without making this article longer than it is. --Airborne84 (talk) 23:23, 28 June 2011 (UTC)

Jungle Book (Disney)[edit]

It's really the Disney version of Kipling's Jungle Book that brought me to this article. How? Well, since Col. Hathi too shouts this "Sound off!" to his elephant soldiers. The chant starts like this:
Hup 2 3 4
Keep it up 2 3 4
Hup 2 3 4
Keep it up 2 3 4
Company... sound off!
Ho, the aim of our patrol
...
Dunno if this already goes as a parody, but it's really close to that original "Sound off! 1, 2 - Sound off! - 3, 4" line. -andy 217.50.49.10 (talk) 15:34, 16 July 2011 (UTC)

Battleground Cadence[edit]

The cadence in the movie's last scene was lead by the platoon sergeant, not a the drill sergeant. The scene is set on the front lines in Belgium. The closest drill sergeants would have been in Fort Dix, New Jersey. ```` — Preceding unsigned comment added by Robt Fall (talkcontribs) 00:05, 20 July 2012 (UTC)

Re: Section controversial, Airborne Ranger[edit]

Here is a different version we sang at C Co, 4th Bn, 1st BCT Bde. USATC Infantry & Ft Ord CA during BCT 1971. No references, this is OR... Two old ladies layin in bed.....one rolled over to the other and said.....I wanna be an airborn ranger.....I wanna live a life of danger.....I wanna go to Viet Nam.....I wanna kill some Charlie Cong etc Tjlynnjr (talk) 05:46, 23 January 2015 (UTC) .

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