Talk:Nectar (drink)

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Comment[edit]

I don't like this definition of Nectar(drink). Clearly nectar is what bees feast on from a flower, a syrupy sugary substance - so the context of nectar as a drink must refer back to this. The connection to ancient Greek gods and ambrosia is very fitting. Nectar is surely the drink of the gods. The difference between a nectar and a juice must be more than that a juice is 100% fruit juice and a nectar is not. Something to do with sugar content or viscosity of the liquid would sit better. Nectar, like a peach nectar is thick and sickly sweet. A juice seems to have a higher water content, even as squeezed from its fruit, not necessarily reconstituted with water. Some fruits would not produce a nectar. Orange, Apple, Watermelon, tomato etc are so high in water content that they can only produce a juice. Concentrating these products would produce a syrup or a concentrate, not a nectar. Other fruits would not produce a juice. Strawberry, Peach, Guava, Apricot, are low in water content and their drink forms so potent and thick they could only be called nectar.

Do we have some consensus here? 20:47, 12 May 2007‎ User:88.101.0.68 User talk:88.101.0.68

I think if you can provide citations that agree with your interpretation, go ahead and edit the page to reflect this. Nectar is defined in the same way as here in the juice page, so I don't think the changes you propose should be undertaken unless you have citations to back them up.Theseeker4 (talk) 18:04, 23 September 2008 (UTC)
nowadays nectar refers to diluted fruit-juice. so that should stay in the article. but i suppose there's nothing wrong with adding the classic greek definition — Preceding unsigned comment added by 80.127.245.11 (talk) 22:50, 1 July 2011 (UTC)
I added links to the other uses of the term. no other usage should be covered directly in this article.Mercurywoodrose (talk) 23:49, 6 October 2013 (UTC)

Fair use candidate from Commons: File:Soft Drink.svg[edit]

The file File:Soft Drink.svg, used on this page, has been deleted from Wikimedia Commons and re-uploaded at File:Soft Drink.svg. It should be reviewed to determine if it is compliant with this project's non-free content policy, or else should be deleted and removed from this page. If no action is taken, it will be deleted after 7 days. Commons fair use upload bot (talk) 21:23, 27 May 2014 (UTC)

Fair use candidate from Commons: File:Soft Drink.svg[edit]

The file File:Soft Drink.svg, used on this page, has been deleted from Wikimedia Commons and re-uploaded at File:Soft Drink.svg. It should be reviewed to determine if it is compliant with this project's non-free content policy, or else should be deleted and removed from this page. If no action is taken, it will be deleted after 7 days. Commons fair use upload bot (talk) 21:37, 27 May 2014 (UTC)